grain conditioning temperature News

  • New hand-held grain moisture tester available from John Deere

    To help producers more accurately monitor the condition of their grain during harvest and in storage, John Deere introduces the GT-30300 Grain Moisture Tester. This new hand-held device provides direct readout of moisture and test weight for 20 different grains in seconds, without pre-weighing the samples, at the touch of a button. According to Barry Deiters, product manager with John Deere ...


    By John Deere

  • High temperatures `make wheat old before its time`

    Global warming can cause premature ageing in wheat, according to computer modelling studies of the crop's response to growing conditions in northern India. The effects of warming on wheat growth and grain size are far worse than previous crop models indicated, David Lobell, assistant professor in ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • SA growers advised to monitor crops as stem rust emerges

    South Australian grain producers are encouraged to closely monitor wheat crops following the emergence of both stem and leaf rust on the West Coast and in the Lower North. Stem rust has been found in an area of about 16 kilometres in diameter near Kalanbi, north-west of Ceduna. Crops of Yitpi have been mostly affected. SARDI senior plant pathologist Dr Hugh Wallwork said that a single infected ...

  • Heat and Drought Ravage U.S. Crop Prospects—Global Stocks Suffer

    September estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) show 2012 U.S. corn yields at 123 bushels per acre, down by a fourth from the 2009 high of 165 bushels per acre. Yields are the lowest since 1995 and well below the average of the last 30 years. The summer heat and drought also hit U.S. soybean yields, which are down 20 ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • An Indian Summer – A Great Apple Harvest and Cone Bottom Tanks For Cider Production

    Although we’ve heard it all before, this year, we might just be in for that ‘Indian Summer’ we get promised almost every year. A hot summer was predicted and did indeed happen and, according to the Daily Mail, temperatures will be higher than average for the next three months. Forecasters are predicting an Indian summer throughout September and October. Dry and brighter ...


    By ENDURAMAXX

  • Ohio State Expert: Rootless Corn Can Recover

    Rootless or “floppy” corn may look questionable, but under the right conditions, it can recover. Corn crops that are leaning or lodged may be impacted by rootless corn syndrome, said Peter Thomison, an Ohio State University Extension agronomist. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of the university’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Climate’s threat to wheat is rising by degrees

    Climate change threatens dramatic price fluctuations in the price of wheat and potential civil unrest because yields of one of the world’s most important staple foods are badly affected by temperature rise. An international consortium of scientists have been testing wheat crops in laboratory and field trials in many areas of the world in changing climate conditions and discovered that ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Winter Wheat Harvest Woes

    Wheat harvest season is well underway for many U.S. wheat growers. Some of the first soft-red wheat harvested by U.S. farmers in 2015 is the worst in at least 17 years, according to Bloomberg and other sources. This year’s heavy rainfalls  – up to three times ...


    By EnviroLogix Inc.

  • Enjoy it while you can - food prices are going to rise

    Global prices of food could climb by as much as 40 per cent in the coming decade, as the global population continues to surge, a new United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) report released today says. The Agriculture Outlook 2010-19 anticipates that wheat ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Late-Planted Corn Can Still Reap Strong Yields

    Growers worried about delayed planting for corn, take heart – late-planted corn sometimes has reaped better yields than early planted corn, says an agronomist in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. It’s true that the optimal time to get corn planted in southern Ohio is between April 10 and May 10 and in northern Ohio between ...


    By Ohio State University

  • EMSL Analytical announces expanded mycotoxin analyses

    Superior detection limits offered by advanced LC-MS technologies.EMSL Analytical is pleased to announce expanded mycotoxin analyses. Mycotoxins are toxins produced by fungi under various environmental conditions. These toxins have been shown to have a detrimental effect on humans and other animals. Moisture, temperature, substrate type, and interactions with other microbes can all affect ...


  • Ohio State Expert: Cold Snap Could Injure Wheat Depending on Its Growth Stage

    Thanks to last month’s warmer-than-normal temperatures that sped up the growth of wheat crops across Ohio, this week’s cold snap could result in injury for some of those plants. Just how damaging the colder weather will be depends on how advanced the wheat is in its growth stage, said Laura Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with Ohio State University Extension. ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Weather Fluctuations Impact Soybeans Less Than Other Field Crops

    From freezing temperatures and snow flurries to sunny, 80-degree days in a span of a week — if this type of strange weather continues, growers across Ohio want to know, will this have a negative impact on soybean crops? Not really, according to a field crops expert in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.   Laura Lindsey, a soybean ...


    By Ohio State University

  • SA growers advised to monitor crops as stripe rust emerges

    South Australian grain producers are encouraged to closely monitor wheat crops following the first reports of stripe rust for the season. ‘Hot spots’ of stripe rust have been found in several paddocks of Wyalkatchem wheat near Balaklava and Dublin and in crops of Kukri and Marombi wheat near Roseworthy. SARDI senior plant pathologist Dr Hugh Wallwork said the rust had probably blown in from ...

  • Slow Food and FAO launch “Quinoa in the Kitchen”

    The Slow Food movement and FAO officially launched the book, “Quinoa in the Kitchen,” today to continue to promote awareness about the super-food’s potential as the International Year of Quinoa draws to a close. The book gives an overview of quinoa’s roots in the history and culture of the central Andean high plateau, geographically extending across the borders of Peru and ...

  • 12 Innovations to combat drought, improve food security, and stabilize food prices

    Soaring temperatures and low precipitation could not occur at a worse time for many farmers in the United States. Intensifying drought conditions are affecting corn and soybean crops throughout the Midwest, raising grain prices as well as concerns about future food prices. The U.S. Drought Monitor reports that 88 percent of this year’s corn crop and 77 percent of the soybean crop are now ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • The burning issue of combine harvester fires

    Preventative and precautionary measures are essential in reducing the potential for combine harvester fires, according to a Grains Research and Development Corporation-funded investigation into the issue. A spate of harvester fires last season on South Australia’s Yorke Peninsula triggered industry concerns and led to the GRDC seeking an independent investigation and report on harvester ...

  • Cereal Crops Feeling the Heat

    LIVERMORE, California (ENS) - Warming temperatures since 1981 have caused annual losses of about US$5 billion for six major cereal crops, new research has found. This is the first study to estimate how much global food production already has been affected by climate change. From 1981 to 2002, fields of wheat, corn and barley throughout the world have produced a combined 40 million ...

  • GM crops can thrive as climate warms

    Genetically engineering photosynthesis in plants could take advantage of rising global temperatures and increased levels of carbon dioxide, US scientists say. They believe this could achieve much higher yields on the same amount of land and help to stave off the prospect of widespread hunger as human populations increase. Researchers at ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Traditional rice helps beat soil salination

    Rohana Rosairo has hung a sprig of paddy rice over his front door, a good omen for prosperity from the first harvest he reaped a few weeks ago from a long unused field. Rosairo's field, across a dirt track from his home, was just a mass of weeds until April when he cleared the plot and planted seed paddy. 'My father used to grow rice here, but he stopped a long time ago,' he said. High salinity ...


    By IRIN

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