grazing animal News

  • Grazing management effects on stream pollutants

    Surface water quality is important for the proper function of aquatic ecosystems, as well as human needs and recreation. Pasturelands have been found to be major sources of sediment, phosphorus and pathogens in Midwest surface water resources. While poor grazing management may lead to contaminated surface water, little is known about the specific amount of pollution in pasture streams that can be ...

  • Phase out summer grazing, say researchers

    The Sierra Nevada Mountain range serves as an important source of drinking water for the State of California. However, summer cattle grazing on federal lands affects the overall water quality yield from this essential watershed. The authors of an article in the Journal of Water and Health argue that high-altitude summer grazing must be phased out. The greatest economic value of the Sierra Nevada ...


  • Better grazing practices hold key to Kenyan droughts

    The current drought in northern Kenya has deep roots in the current practices of pastoralists that need to be addressed, says conservationist David Western. Failed rains have tipped the balance from poverty to starvation for 12 million in the Horn of Africa. But they don't explain the depth of the tragedy, any more than the growing threat of ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • `Holistic grazing` wins sustainable practice award

    A project hoping to reverse desertification through "holistic management" of livestock has been awarded US$100,000 prize in a global competition on sustainable practices. By carefully planning the grazing of the cattle on fields, Operation Hope has reclaimed some 6,500 acres of grasslands at the Africa Center for Holistic Management, Zimbabwe — where the project is based — while ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • The Gas Endeavour at the European Federation of Animal Science meeting

    We took our Gas Endeavour to Belfast, UK, for the EAAP 2016 on August 29 – September 3, when over 1400 participants representing both academia and the industry gathered from 59 countries. There were 700 presentations and 450 posters on various ...


    By Bioprocess Control AB

  • Corn Residue Great Option for Livestock Supplemental Feed

    Corn residue left over from harvesting can make an excellent source of supplemental feed for livestock, according to a forage expert from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. This is especially true for producers who are facing lower hay crop inventories thanks to the excessive rains that impacted the region during the beginning of the ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Open day on livestock research at CSIRO Armidale

    To be held from 10am on Friday, 10 December 2010, the event is an opportunity for livestock producers and interested members of the general public to learn about CSIRO’s research on: Productivity and product quality in the Australian sheep and cattle industries Advanced reproductive technologies Parasite control Animal physiology, behaviour and welfare ...

  • Cattle contribute to greenhouse gas production in soil

    As harmless as cattle may seem, they are regarded as a threat to the climate. Through their digestion they produce the green house gas methane, which they expel continuously. Scientists from the Institute of Soil Ecology of the GSF – National Research Centre for Environment and Health in Neuherberg, Germany and Czech colleagues at the Budwies Academy of Sciences have shown that cattle can boost ...

  • Two new limpograss cultivars released for select Florida cattlemen

    The University of Florida, in partnership with Florida Foundation Seed Producers Inc., has released two new limpograss cultivars so ranchers can increase the forage variety they feed their cattle. Florida beef cattle producers use limpograss, a warm-season, perennial grass for its high digestibility, cool-season growth and tolerance to poorly drained soils. The new lines, limpograsses 4F and 10, ...

  • Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from livestock: what are the costs?

    The livestock sector is estimated to contribute 14.5% of all global anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study estimated the costs of reducing emissions from ruminant livestock using five different practices. The findings will help policymakers to understand the cost effectiveness of different interventions in the sector, and the contribution that different policies could make to ...

  • Fighting climate change with grasslands

    Grasslands have vast untapped potential to mitigate climate change by absorbing and storing CO2, according to a new report by FAO. Pastures and rangelands represent a carbon sink that could be greater than forests if properly managed. Covering some 30 percent of the earth’s ice-free land surface and accounting for 70 percent of its agricultural land, the world’s 3.4 billion ha of grasslands can ...

  • Intensive grassland farming could have deep effects: sequestering significantly less soil carbon

    Huge amounts of soil carbon have been discovered up to 1 metre below grassland in a recent UK study. Yet most carbon inventories do not assess soil deeper than 30 cm. Furthermore, this research suggests that intensive management of grassland, involving high rates of fertiliser use and livestock grazing, may deplete carbon at these depths. Globally, soil contains more carbon than all the ...

  • Choice of tree species and site can increase plant diversity in plantation forest

    Careful choice of tree species and sites could transform plantations into refuges for woodland plant diversity, new research from Ireland suggests. Plantations of native species on or near historic woodland and those with adequate light levels below the tree canopy were found to support more plant species. Europe’s forests cover 45% of the land area, and provide important habitat ...

  • Research sheds new light on methane emissions from the northern beef herd

    New CSIRO research indicates that the amount of methane emitted from cattle fed on tropical grasses in northern Australia is up to 30 per cent less than figures currently used to calculate the northern cattle industry’s contribution to Australia’s greenhouse gas accounts. Speaking at today’s Lansdown Field Day near Townsville, Queensland, CSIRO research leader Dr Ed ...

  • Sizing up livestock farming’s carbon footprint

    A new and interactive tool released by FAO allows farmers, policy makers and scientists to calculate meat, milk and eggs production as well as greenhouse-gas emissions from livestock to make the sector more productive and more climate-friendly.   GLEAM-i, the Global Livestock Environmental Assessment Modelinteractive, provides answers to a ...

  • Paddock cleaner is `dung deal` for Wessex

    Grazed paddocks need regular cleaning and if they are large a great deal of time and effort is expended picking up droppings. It all adds up throughout the year when time could be better spent on more productive tasks. There is an ideal solution in the Wessex Dung Beetle, a self-powered paddock cleaner which is versatile and quick and easy to hook onto a 50mm tow hitch on a quad, UTV, tractor or ...


    By Wessex International

  • Livestock Recommendations - Farming Regulation Task Force

    At the Oxford Farming Conference the Secretary of State announced:  From 2016, the introduction of a generic 10 mile rule for CPH allocation across farmed species, alongside a new solution for dealing with land being used for temporary grazing within 10 miles of the home holding;  From 2017, the abolition of all CTS Links and Sole Occupancy Authority (SOAs) licences; ...

  • Can biochar help suppress greenhouse gases?

    Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas and a precursor to compounds that contribute to the destruction of the ozone. Intensively managed, grazed pastures are responsible for an increase in nitrous oxide emissions from grazing animals’ excrement. Biochar is potentially a mitigation option for reducing the world’s elevated carbon dioxide emissions, since the embodied carbon can be ...

  • A new tool to assess nitrogen and phosphorus flow in agriculture

    MITERRA-EUROPE is a new tool that models the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus, among other key pollutants, used in agriculture across all 27 Member States at regional, country and EU-27 levels. It can be used to calculate the effects of different strategies to minimise excess pollution.  Many regions in the EU-27 use more nitrogen and phosphorus in agriculture than is required. The main sources ...

  • Cow-calf Producers: Pay Attention to Livestock Nutrition Needs, Especially After Calving

    As livestock producers move from winter feed to spring grazing, they should pay extra attention to spring-calving beef cows to make sure their nutritional needs are met, says a beef cattle expert with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. That could mean leading the animals away from early green grass this spring, said John Grimes, beef ...


    By Ohio State University

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