group livestock scale News

  • EPA sued for scrapping livestock data collection

    Environmental and animal welfare groups sued the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencyon Wednesday, alleging the federal agency unlawfully scrapped a rule that would have authorized it to collect information from large-scale livestock confinement farms. The Center for Food Safety, Environmental Integrity Project, Food & Water Watch, The Humane ...


    By Associated Press

  • Cactus could feed East African livestock, say scientists

    A succulent, wild-growing cactus that has been widely dismissed as a noxious weed could sustain African livestock during drought, according to scientists at the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI). A paper by John Kang"ara and Josiah Gitari, animal nutritionists at KARI, concludes that Opuntia species — the prickly pear or paddle cacti — have extreme tolerance to drought and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Edible insects inch one step closer

    Farming insects on a large scale is no more of a biological or chemical hazard than other livestock farming, says a report by a European food safety body. The report, which looks at the potential of insects as food or animal feed, says the microbiological, chemical and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • 12 Innovations to combat drought, improve food security, and stabilize food prices

    Soaring temperatures and low precipitation could not occur at a worse time for many farmers in the United States. Intensifying drought conditions are affecting corn and soybean crops throughout the Midwest, raising grain prices as well as concerns about future food prices. The U.S. Drought Monitor reports that 88 percent of this year’s corn crop and 77 percent of the soybean crop are now ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • El Niño lowers early production outlook in Southern Africa

    Crop and livestock production prospects in Southern Africa have been weakened by the El Niño weather phenomenon that has lowered rains and increased temperatures. A reduced agricultural output would follow on last year's disappointing season, which has already contributed to higher food prices and "could acutely impact the food security situation in 2016," according to a special alert ...

  • Environmental impact research urged for fish farming

    More research and sharing of best practice could minimise the environmental impacts of aquaculture, and maximise its potential to alleviate food insecurity, according to a report by the WorldFish Center and the non-profit organisation Conservation International. Almost half of all seafood consumed ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Bion - Kreider Project Grand Opening Follow Up

    Bion Environmental Technologies, Inc. (OTC: BNET) and Kreider Farms recently held the grand opening of Bion's livestock waste treatment project that utilizes its patented micro-aerobic digestion technology to reduce environmental impacts to the Chesapeake Bay. The event was held at the Kreider Farms dairy facility in Manheim, Lancaster ...

  • Chevrolet supports grassland preservation program

    Chevrolet has become the first corporate participant in a public-private initiative that pays farmers not to convert natural prairie to large-scale agriculture, which would release gases that are warming the planet, officials said Monday. The automaker, a division of General Motors, said it has bought more than 39,000 metric tons of carbon credits ...


    By Associated Press

  • Q&A: Ethanol, oil and what it means to be green

    Q: What is the ethanol mandate? A: In 2007, Congress passed a law requiring oil companies to blend corn ethanol into the gasoline supply. That requirement started at 9 billion gallons and has risen each year since. This year, it's about 13 billion gallons. Barack Obama, who was running for president against a crowded field of Democrats in the Iowa caucuses, was a champion for this law. And with ...


    By Associated Press

  • Crop breeding gets boost from sweet potatoes

    In Uganda, the sweet potato is a major staple crop. Behind China and Nigeria, Uganda produces the most sweet potatoes in the world. Nationwide, families grow the crop to feed themselves, their livestock and to use as a source of income. Small scale agricultural operations use a large number of sweet potato varieties in their planting. These varieties are steadily being lost due to weevils, sweet ...

  • Targeting gaps in the food supply chain: going beyond agricultural production to achieve food security

    Agricultural production is only the first step in moving the world’s food from farm to fork, according to Nourishing the Planet, a project of the Worldwatch Institute. The other links in the food chain—harvesting, packaging, storing, transporting, marketing, and selling—ensure that food actually reaches consumers. Inefficiencies in these activities, rather than just low yields ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Global business climate for agricultural machinery has weakened, says Agrievolution Alliance survey

    Agrievolution Alliance says manufacturers of tractors and agricultural machines are less satisfied with their current business situation than they have been in the past four years, based on responses to its latest biannual survey of machine manufacturers and importers. Agrievolution Alliance, a global network of the leading agricultural machinery associations representing more than 6,000 ...

  • Africa could feed itself, says development expert

    Africa could feed itself within a generation through the application of science-based techniques to agricultural production, according to the editor of a report on how to do this, which will be discussed by East African heads of state today. The continent has a window of opportunity in which to take decisions to increase food production that would enable it to feed itself, said the report, put ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • In the world: nanotech on the farm - MIT chemical engineer Paula Hammond lends her nanotechnology expertise to farmers in Africa.

    Cassava is a tropical root vegetable and staple crop for millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa. However, it’s tricky to handle: Once the root is removed from the ground, it spoils within one to three days, so farmers must get it to processing centers as soon as possible after harvesting it. If they don’t, the crop goes to waste. A simple way to prolong cassava’s shelf life could help farmers ...

  • UN Conference on Small Island Developing States opens in Samoa

    A renewed political commitment to tackle the many unique, sustainable development challenges facing the world's small island states, is expected to be the most important outcome of a United Nations conference that opened in Samoa today. The Third International Conference on Small Developing States (SIDS) from 1-4 September in Apia, Samoa also seeks to build partnerships aimed at addressing issues ...

  • Data gaps hamper disaster risk reduction

    Reducing risks and losses from natural disasters calls for collaboration between social and natural scientists, who in turn must work with policy makers, communities and development groups, an international expert has said. For example, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Despite drop from 2009 peak, agricultural land grabs still remain above pre-2005 levels

    An estimated 70.2 million hectares of agricultural land worldwide have been sold or leased to private and public investors since 2000, according to new research conducted by the Worldwatch Institute (www.worldwatch.org) for its Vital Signs Online service. The bulk of these acquisitions, which are called “land grabs” by some observers, took place between 2008 ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • World agribusiness R&D controlled by `cosy cartel`

    The increasing consolidation of global agribusiness is leaving the world's food production in the hands of a corporate "cartel", warns a new market report from ETC Group, a civil society organization based in Canada. According to the report, six multinational corporations — BASF, Bayer, Dow, DuPont, Monsanto and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Cranfield launches European project to promote the use of trees in farming

    The first meeting of ‘AGFORWARD’, an exciting EU funded research programme on agroforestry, was held at Cranfield University this week.  The 4-year 6 million Euro project will be working with farmers and land owners in 15 countries across Europe to identify how agroforestry practices – farming with trees – can create  profitable, productive, and environmentally ...


    By Cranfield University

  • FAO and ILO urge countries to better protect children working in fisheries and aquaculture

    Governments need to take measures to protect children from harmful work in small-scale fisheries and aquaculture, say the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the International Labour Organization (ILO). According to a guidance document published jointly by the two UN agencies, almost every country ...

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