honeybee News

  • USDA spending $3M to feed honeybees in Midwest

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Tuesday it will spend millions of dollars to help farmers and ranchers improve pastures in five Midwestern states to provide food for the nation's struggling honeybees. Commercial honeybees pollinate an estimated $15 billion worth of produce each year. Many beekeepers bring hives to the ...


    By Associated Press

  • Wild insects could take over the pollinating role of honeybees

    Scientists have identified several wild insects that could undertake the crop pollination function of honeybees. By comparing a range of pollinating insects they found three wild species that appear to be as efficient as the honeybee in pollination but may need management to increase their numbers. The honeybee (Apis mellifera) is in rapid decline worldwide. While it is important to understand ...

  • Can new biopesticide protect crops without harming honeybees?

    A potential new biopesticide, made of spider venom and snowdrop proteins, kills agricultural pests but shows minimal toxicity to honeybees, new research suggests. Learning and memory of honeybees exposed to the biopesticide were not affected, even at doses higher than they would normally encounter in the environment. Insect pollination is vital for food production; however, there are concerns ...

  • Wild bees boost apple harvest

    Orchards pollinated by a wide range of wild bee species grow more apples than those pollinated by fewer species, finds a new US study. Its authors suggest that farmers could consider investing in wild bee conservation to improve crop yield. Many farmers around the world hire or manage hives of honeybees to help pollinate crops including fruit and nuts. However, demand for pollinator-dependent ...

  • Loss of wild pollinators would hit crops, finds study

    The loss of wild pollinators from agricultural landscapes could threaten global crop yields, a study has found. Led by Lucas Garibaldi, an assistant professor at the National University of Río Negro inArgentina, a team of researchers compared fields containing many wild pollinators — mostly insects — ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Bees actively prefer nectar contaminated with neonicotinoid pesticides

    Honeybees and bumblebees prefer feeding on nectar laced with certain neonicotinoid pesticides to uncontaminated food, new research has shown. Far from the predictions of some, that bees would avoid food contaminated with neonicotinoid pesticides if given the choice, a new study has shown that bees did not avoid any of the three most common neonicotinoids: imidacloprid, thiamethoxam or ...

  • Drone to drone

    When I was trying to establish the size of the Greenham Common Drone Congregation Area (DCA – those special sites where honeybee drones gather in the hope of mating with a queen), I met a couple flying a radio-controlled drone. In conversation, they told me that they had noticed some insects flying around their drone. I was obviously intrigued – all the more so when ...


    By Vita Europe Limited

  • Vita 2016 Photo Competition Winners

    The overall winner of Vita’s 2016 international photo competition is Lester Quayle with his image of industrious housekeeping honey bees. May Smith is the under-16 winner for her striking photograph of a pollen-carrying honey bee just landed on a brood frame. Entries will appear in the limited edition 2016 Vita Calendar distributed to Vita’s global network and ...


    By Vita Europe Limited

  • Neonicotinoid pesticides are a huge risk – so ban is welcome, says EEA

    The European Commission has decided to ban three neonicotinoid insecticides. These chemicals can harm honeybees, according to a large body of scientific evidence, so the European Environment Agency (EEA) commends the precautionary decision to ban them. The three banned insecticides are clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiametoxam. A ...

  • Warning from European Academies of Science about implications of neonicotinoid use

    A joint report to the European Commission from the Academies of Science in the EU Member States concludes that there is rapidly increasing scientific evidence that neonicotinoids have a significant negative impact on the natural environment. Some of the organisms affected fulfil important functions in agricultural areas, for example, the wild pollinators and the predatory insects which can play ...

  • EPA plans temporary pesticide restrictions while bees feed

    If honeybees are busy pollinating large, blooming croplands, farmers wanting to spray toxic pesticides will soon have to buzz off, the Environmental Protection Agency is proposing. A federal rule to be proposed Thursday would create temporary pesticide-free zones when certain plants are in bloom around bees that are trucked from farm to farm ...


    By Associated Press

  • Bee Music Live at Kew Hive

    Last night saw the first live music performances inside the astonishing Hive at Kew Gardens, London. BE – the musical collective behind the honeybee-inspited soundscape that fills Wolfgang Buttress’ Hive – performed ...


    By Vita Europe Limited

  • USDA and EPA Release New Report on Honey Bee Health

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today released a comprehensive scientific report on honey bee health. The report states that there are multiple factors playing a role in honey bee colony declines, including parasites and disease, genetics, poor nutrition and pesticide exposure. "There is an important link between the health of American ...

  • Moab Site is ‘Beezy’ with a New Kind of Worker

    Things are abuzz at EM’s Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site in Utah. This spring, two Italian honeybee hives were started on the site’s northeast portion. Moab Remedial Action Contractor Radiological Control Manager Ron Daily, a hobby beekeeper, noticed a lack of natural pollinators at the Moab site other than wind. He ...


    By US Department of Energy

  • Greenpeace welcomes another step in taking action on bee-killing pesticide

    A European Commission proposal to restrict the use of a pesticide that has been shown to kill bees received the support of a strong majority of EU country representatives today. 23 EU member states voted in favour of a partial ban on the chemical, with only 2 against and 3 abstaining [1]. Greenpeace believes that the proposed ban will not be enough to allow for bee recovery and that only a full ...


    By Greenpeace International

  • Pesticides may harm wild bees but natural areas can mitigate effects

    The use of pesticides in orchards may be threatening populations of wild bees, which are important pollinators that increase crop productivity, a new study concludes. However, the damage was mitigated in areas where the orchards were surrounded by natural landscapes, such as deciduous forests. Pollinators, such as bees, provide an important and often underappreciated ecosystem service to ...

  • Growing Better Bee Habitats

    General Mills investing in pollinator habitats, research SOURCE: General Mills DESCRIPTION: General Mills’ ...


    By 3BL Media

  • Where have all the flowers gone?

    Global food production may be approaching another major crisis. Crops around the world are pollinated by honeybees, but bee populations are dying off rapidly due to excessive use of pesticides and other environmental factors. The threat of food production losses is becoming painfully apparent, and the economic, social and environmental costs could be staggering. This growing threat to the global ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Bee pollination improves crop quality as well as quantity

    Bee pollination improves the shape, weight and shelf-life of strawberries, contributing a staggering €1.05 billion to the European strawberry market per year, new research suggests. By blocking bees from a set of plants, the researchers demonstrated the substantial effects of bee pollination on the quality of the fruit. It is well established that insect pollination increases the quantity of ...

  • Research Strengthens Link Between Pesticides and Colony Collapse Disorder, Supports Petitioners` Case for EPA Action

     Three studies released in the past two weeks, including one today by Harvard University, add to the growing body of evidence that implicate pesticides, specifically neonicotinoids, as one of the most critical factors contributing to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), bolstering the need for regulatory action. The research is timely as beekeepers and environmentalists recently filed a legal ...


    By Beyond Pesticides

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