in-field plant pathogen News

  • Soil gives away soybean pathogen’s presence

    New research reveals that soil pH is a useful guide for farmers and agronomists to detect and manage soybean cyst nematode, a devastating soybean pathogen. The investigation uncovered a relationship between high soil pH, which is already outside the ideal growing conditions for soybean, and high populations of cyst nematodes. Scientists from Iowa State University and University of ...

  • ARS plant collections help safeguard crops

    In the months ahead, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists plan to collect walnuts from Kyrgyzstan, grasses from Russia, and carrots and sunflowers from fields across the Southeastern United States in efforts that will enhance one of the nation's most effective tools for protecting the food supply. Researchers will make the trips to collect plants with useful ...

  • Florendovirus: new genus of virus in plant genomes

    While the extent and importance of endogenous viral elements have been thoroughly researched in animals, there is a dearth of knowledge when it comes to plants. Within the framework of a broader international effort, researchers at INRA Versailles-Grignon and Cirad have described a new genus of the Caulimoviridae family of viruses, called Florendovirus, whose members have colonised the genomes of ...

  • Testing new biological plant protection products for effectiveness and practical feasibility

    A naturally occurring fungus codenamed ‘H39’ might be the long-sought biological defence against the dreaded apple scab. “This fungus has not only been tested for its ability to fight the pathogen. The new Select BioControl method was also used to immediately assess the practical feasibility of deploying it as a commercial product,” says Dr Jürgen Köhl of ...

  • Some but not all plants can defend themselves against disease on saline soil

    Some plants with resistance against a specific disease are also able to defend themselves effectively when they are stressed due to, for example, drought or saline soil. At the same time, the resistance of other plants no longer functions in these very same conditions. Although this had been assumed for some time, Wageningen scientist Christos Kissoudis is the first person to show why. As a ...

  • USDA Makes $5 Million in Farm Bill Support for National Clean Plant Network Available

    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack announced today the allocation of $5 million to support 19 projects under the National Clean Plant Network (NCPN) funded under the Agriculture Act of 2014 (the 2014 Farm Bill). NCPN-funded facilities provide high-quality propagative plant material that is free of plant pathogens and pests that can otherwise cause economic losses to the ...

  • Southern soils mitigate manure microbes

    That swine manure sprayed on to fields adds valuable nutrients to the soil is well known. But what is not known is whether all that manure is bringing harmful bacteria with it. A new study looks at the levels of nutrients and bacteria in soils of fields that have been sprayed with manure for fifteen years or more. The research team, composed of scientists from the USDA-ARS Crop Science Research ...

  • Resistance genes from wild relatives of crops offer opportunities for more sustainable agriculture worldwidew

    Growing crops with stacks of two or more resistance genes from closely related species, introduced into the crop via for instance genetic engineering, combined with the simultaneous introduction of resistance management, can ensure the long-term resistance of these plants to economically significant and aggressive diseases. The combination offers opportunities to make agriculture more sustainable ...

  • Managing Late Blight of Potatoes and Tomatoes

    Late blight is one of the most serious diseases of potatoes and tomatoes worldwide, resulting in significant yield and quality losses annually. In Alberta, late blight occurs infrequently, but can have devastating impacts in the years when it reaches epidemic levels.  “This disease is caused by a fungal pathogen called Phytophthora infestans,” says Robert Spencer, ...

  • Marrone Bio Innovations` Regalia® Biofungicide Label Significantly Expanded

      DAVIS, Calif., Jan. 18, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Marrone Bio Innovations today announced that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved a significant label expansion for Regalia®, a biofungicide that boosts plants' natural defenses to fight fungal and bacterial diseases. The label expansion includes new soil applications, ...

  • Global stem rust tracker unveiled in China

    A global monitoring system was unveiled today to track the spread of devastating wheat pathogens known as stem rusts, at the 2012 Borlaug Global Rust Initiative (BGRI) Technical Workshop in China. The functional surveillance and monitoring network, the Global Cereal Rust Monitoring System ('Rust Tracker'), now covers 27 countries and a large ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • RRI, STRASA and PAU hold workshop on major rice pests and diseases in Southeast Asia

    STRASA (Stress Tolerant Rice for Africa and South Asia), the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), and Punjab Agricultural University (PAU), Ludhiana, India held a two-day review and planning workshop on major rice pests and diseases in Southeast Asia at Punjab Agricultural University on 15-16 September. Twenty cooperators (13 from India , 3 from IRRI, 3 from Bangladesh. and 1 from Nepal) ...

  • Durably resistant potatoes with wild potato genes offer 80% reduction in chemical control

    A research project into the development of potatoes with sustainable resistance against phytophthora via genetic modification with genes from wild potato varieties and good resistance management (DuRPh) has concluded with a scientific publication on the research results. The Wageningen UR scientists indicated that their approach was successful in developing potato plants which require 80% less ...

  • Marrone Bio Innovations Files Patent for a Unique Bacillus Species

    Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc. (MBI) a leading global provider of natural pest management products for the agricultural and water treatment markets, announces the submission of a patent application encompassing a new Bacillus sp. strain F727, to the United States Patent and Trademark Office. This strain was first discovered from soil collected in California by ...

  • Renewed cooperation between CIHEAM and FAO

    The International Centre for Advanced Mediterranean Agronomic Studies (CIHEAM) based in Paris and FAO will strengthen their cooperation under an agreement signed at FAO's Rome headquarters this week. The Agreement of Cooperation was signed by Bertrand Hervieu, Secretary General of CIHEAM and Hervé Lejeune, FAO Assistant Director-General and Directeur de Cabinet. In it, both organizations agreed ...

  • South Pacific coconut gene bank under threat

    The international collection of the South Pacific's coconut palm species, held at a field gene bank in Papua New Guinea (PNG), is under threat from a disease outbreak close to the gene bank. The warning came at a meeting on the Pacific coconut research and development (R&D) strategy in Samoa last week (1 October–2 November), convened by the Australian Centre for International ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Syngenta launches new biological seed treatment

    Syngenta today announced the launch of the EPIVIO brand family, a range of new biostimulants which address abiotic stresses through seed treatment. Over the last five years Syngenta has developed abiotic stress management testing capabilities to simulate drought, heat, cold and nutrient stresses. Seed treatment products resulting from this R&D platform are now commercialized under the ...


    By Syngenta

  • Compost made by worms from livestock manure yields benefits when applied to maize

    Vermicomposting livestock manure with maize can increase agricultural benefit by 304%, shows a new study. The combination of increased crop yield and the additional earthworms produced as a result of the process led to a substantial increase in output compared to a traditional composting system. As intensive agriculture and livestock production both increase, unique problems emerge. Heavy use of ...

  • Benefits of collaborative research highlighted in ASA, CSSA, SSSA webinar

    In these fiscally constrained times, federally-funded researchers face more pressure than ever before to show the greater societal benefits of their research. To that end, many researchers are now working in multidisciplinary teams that combine agricultural, environmental, economic, and social science research in order to better understand the economic and social benefits associated with basic ...

  • Changes in species interaction provide clues to climate change extinctions

    How does climate change cause extinction? An extensive analysis of the available evidence has explored this question and concluded that climate change’s effects on the interactions between species is likely to be the main reason for local extinctions. For example, climate change may lead to the loss of prey for predators. Currently, there is much evidence to show that species ...

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