insect pest control laboratories News

  • Neonicotinoids: may reduce crop yields by poisoning insects that eat slug pests

    Beetles that are helpful to farmers can be poisoned if they feed on slugs that have eaten crops treated with neonicotinoids, a new study reports. The slugs themselves are not harmed by neonicotinoids. In American field trials, researchers found that plots planted with neonicotinoid-treated soybeans contained more slugs, fewer beetle predators and had 5% lower yields. The insecticide may be ...

  • Four in one – new discovery on pest fruit flies

    Four of the world's most destructive agricultural pests are actually one and the same fruit fly, according to the results of a global research effort released today. The discovery should lead to the easing of certain international trade restrictions and also aid efforts to combat the ability of these harmful insects to reproduce, experts said. The so-called Oriental, Philippine, Invasive and ...

  • Overseas Lab Seeks U.S. Weed Control `Recruits`

    The search is on for insects, mites, microbes or nematodes that could be used in a biologically based approach to controlling silverleaf nightshade, an invasive weed from the Americas that has spread to southern Europe, Africa, India, Australia and elsewhere. According to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologist Walker Jones, the perennial weed, Solanum elaeagnifolium, is being targeted ...

  • Organic pesticides may not always be the best choice

    Organic pesticides may not always be the most environmentally-friendly choice of pest control, according to recent research. Two new synthetic pesticides for controlling aphids were found to be less harmful to other species and more efficient than the two new organic pesticides tested in the study. It is often thought that newer organic and natural pesticides are uniformly safer and therefore ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Senegal nears first victory in war on tsetse fly

    A campaign against the tsetse fly, a pest that transmits a disease that devastates livestock, in the Niayes area near the capital Dakar has radically reduced the fly population and is paving the way for complete eradication. "Since the project started, there is already less disease. It has not only reduced the tsetse but also ticks, which cause lots of other diseases in the area. We have noticed ...

  • Ohio State Greenhouse Management Workshop for Greenhouse Growers, Operators and Pesticide Applicators

    New, better ways to control pests will be the focus of Ohio State University’s 2015 Greenhouse Management Workshop in January. Registration is now open, with a discount rate until Jan. 9. The workshop, which is for greenhouse growers, operators and pesticide applicators, takes place Jan. 22-23 in the Ohio Agricultural Research and ...


    By Ohio State University

  • AgBiome Awarded Grant from Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

    AgBiome, LLC, a leader in the development of microbial solutions for agriculture, has been awarded a multi-year grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to discover biological insect control for deployment to smallholder farmers in African nations. The project, entitledRSM Systems Biology for Sweetpotato: Engineering the African Root/Soil/Microbiome for Enhanced Crop Productivity, ...


    By AgBiome, Inc.

  • Marrone Bio Innovations Acquires Manufacturing Plant in Michigan

            DAVIS, Calif., Aug. 3, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc. (MBI) announced today that it has acquired an 11,400-square-foot manufacturing facility on 11 acres in Bangor, Michigan. The Marrone Michigan Manufacturing facility will provide MBI with the necessary capacity to advance its growing pipeline of natural pest management ...

  • Nitrogen fertiliser `could prevent locust swarms`

    A surprising finding promises a cheap and environmentally friendly way of controlling locust swarms, a major plague that devastates crops around the world. Land erosion caused by heavy livestock grazing promotes ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Transgenic Corn Found to Damage Stream Ecosystems

    BLOOMINGTON, Indiana, October 11, 2007 (ENS) - A widely planted variety of genetically engineered corn has the potential to harm aquatic ecosystems, finds a new study by an Indiana University professor of environmental science and his colleagues. Pollen and other plant parts containing toxins from genetically engineered Bt corn are washing into streams near cornfields and harming a ...

  • Warning from European Academies of Science about implications of neonicotinoid use

    A joint report to the European Commission from the Academies of Science in the EU Member States concludes that there is rapidly increasing scientific evidence that neonicotinoids have a significant negative impact on the natural environment. Some of the organisms affected fulfil important functions in agricultural areas, for example, the wild pollinators and the predatory insects which can play ...

  • Microscopic molecules can fight citrus greening bug with less insecticides

    Researchers with the University of Florida and several other institutions have found a way in laboratory tests to use 200 times less insecticide and yet still kill as many insects that carry the devastating citrus greening bacterium. It is a step forward in ridding groves of the insect that is threatening to destroy Florida’s $10.7 billion citrus industry. Lukasz Stelinski, an ...

  • Ministries Need to Collaborate to Ensure Continued Productivity of Farmland and Forests in ECA

    As economies in the ECA region grow, farm and forest productivity will need to keep pace with rising consumer and industrial demand for food and wood.  But doing so by pushing natural resources beyond their limits can be disastrous. Governments in the region have taken steps to address this issue, but they – ministries of environment in partnership with others such as agriculture, forestry ...


    By The World Bank

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