irrigation rule News

  • Irrigation key for Africa’s food security – Diouf

    Water management is 'a key element' in food security, FAO Director-General Jacques Diouf told a ministerial conference on Water for Agriculture and Energy in Africa: the Challenges of Climate Change which opened this week. The conference is organized by FAO, as the Chair of UN Water, together with the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Government and in collaboration with stakeholders including the African ...

  • Produce Safety Rule to Change the Way Fresh Fruit, Vegetables Are Grown and Handled

    Ever since the Food Safety Modernization Act was signed into law in January 2011 and the act’s Produce Safety Rule was proposed two years later, fruit and vegetable growers have waited for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to finalize the regulations they will be expected to follow on the farm. Now that the FDA has done so — the final Produce Safety rule was printed in the Federal ...


    By Ohio State University

  • U.S.-Africa Energy Ministerial Co-Chairs’ Summary from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz and Ethiopian Minister of Water, Irrigation and Energy Alemayehu Tegenu

    The U.S.-Africa Energy Ministerial (USAEM) was held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on 3-4 June 2014 at the African Union Conference Center. The two-day meeting was characterized by constructive and collaborative discussion among the delegations, the private sector, and other stakeholders. The meeting ended with agreement to develop a clear roadmap to catalyze sustainable energy development across ...


    By US Department of Energy

  • California judge says she`ll likely uphold farmer water cuts

    California's demand for lower agricultural water use during the drought will likely survive a legal challenge, a judge indicated Thursday. Sacramento Superior Court Judge Shelleyanne Chang said during a hearing that she believes the state's revised approach to warning farmers of insufficient supplies is legal. She previously ruled that other notices were improper. At issue are thousands of ...


    By Associated Press

  • ‘South Asia’s canal projects spread malaria’, says report

    Independent India should learn lessons from the deadly malaria epidemics that swept many parts of the country in the last century, attributable to indiscriminate canal building and related projects by the then rulers, a new study suggests. The study by Elizabeth Whitcombe, visiting senior research scholar at the earth system science ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Klamath Tribes and feds exercise water rights

    Tens of thousands of acres in Oregon's drought-stricken Klamath Basin will have to go without irrigation water this summer after the Klamath Tribes and the federal government exercised newly confirmed powers that put the tribes in the driver's seat over water use - a move ranchers fear will be economically disastrous. Klamath Tribes Chairman Don Gentry and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner ...


    By Associated Press

  • More California winemakers using less water to grow grapes

    The grape vines that grower Frank Leeds tends in Napa Valley stand among the unheralded heroes of California's drought, producing decade after decade of respected Cabernets and other wines without a drop of added water. In a state where farms and dairies take the biggest gulp of the water supply, Leeds and the owners of his Frog's Leap Winery are among a minority - but a growing minority - of ...


    By Associated Press

  • Water concerns in farming back in the news

    Tighter water abstraction rules once again threaten to have an affect on UK food production growers have been warned, according to Farmers Weekly. Time-limited water abstraction licenses, which are due to expire this year, are being assessed by the Environment Agency to ensure that they comply with the EU Water Framework Directive. License conditions may change if they are deemed to be a risk to ...


    By ENDURAMAXX

  • Water demand for crops may rise in northern Germany under warmer climate

    By 2070, there may be insufficient water for irrigation to ensure yields and profitability for some crops currently grown in northern Germany - if the IPCC´s worst case climate change scenario becomes a reality - new research warns. To reduce future demand for water under a changing climate, the study suggests that farmers grow different crops and change their management practices. In ...

  • Murray-Darling Water Crisis Leaves Farmers, Environment Dry

    CANBERRA, Australia (ENS) - Record low water inflows to the Murray-Darling Basin this year mean that water will not be available for irrigation, the environment or any purpose other than critical drinking water supplies, Prime Minister John Howard and the premiers of three Australian states said today. The prime minister called the drought 'unprecedented' and said that 'based on ...

  • U.S. EPA recognizes 2015 WaterSense Partners of the Year in California and Nevada

    Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recognized the Sonoma-Marin Saving Water Partnership, the Municipal Water District of Orange County, KB Home, Energy Inspectors Corporation, and 13 other winners as WaterSense Partners of the Year for creating, rebating, communicating and educating consumers about WaterSense labeled products, homes and programs. EPA Region 9 is working with all ...

  • EPA Recognizes The Home Depot as a WaterSense® 2015 Partner of the Year for Making a Difference Every Day

    The Home Depot, headquartered in Atlanta, Ga., was among those recognized today by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a 2015 WaterSense Partner of the Year. The Partner of the Year awards program the commitment of WaterSense partners for creating, rebating, communicating and educating consumers about WaterSense-labeled products, homes and programs. A total of 17 winners and more ...

  • EPA recognizes WaterSense 2015 Partners of the Year

    Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized the 2015 WaterSense award winners for creating, rebating, communicating and educating consumers about WaterSense-labeled products, homes and programs. These 17 winners and more than 1,700 other WaterSense partners have helped Americans save 1.1 trillion gallons of water and $21.7 billion in water and energy bills since 2006. ...

  • Lack of science means jatropha biofuel `could fail poor`

    Mass planting of jatropha as a biofuel crop could benefit poor areas as well as combating global warming, but only if a number of scientific and production issues are properly addressed, a review has warned. Growing jatropha for biofuel on degraded land unsuitable for food and cash crops could help improve the earnings of small farmers and counter poverty, reports the Food and Agriculture ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • NRDC: Court Upholds Key Protections for California Bay-Delta Health

    The U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals today ruled to uphold a federal plan of protection for California’s vital Delta ecosystem. The court sided with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Earthjustice, The Bay Institute and the federal government in its determination that protections for the threatened delta smelt – a bellwether species that indicates the health of the vital ...

  • International experts limit Melamine levels in food

    An international food safety body has set new rules on preparing bagged salads and said the chemical melamine that tainted Chinese milk is acceptable only in tiny amounts in infant formula and food. The maximum amount of melamine allowed in powdered infant formula is 1 mg/kg and the amount of the chemical allowed in other foods and animal feed is 2.5 mg/kg, according to new rulings from the ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Pakistan needs a new crop forecasting system

    Pakistan's outdated crop yield forecasting system needs a revamp, says Ibrar ul Hassan Akhtar. Like most developing countries, Pakistan is staring at the spectre of food insecurity, with its food production out of sync with population growth. The food availability scenario is further ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • OSHA Whistleblower Investigation Finds Southwest Oklahoma Development Authority Fired Greens Keeper for Reporting Use of Untreated Wastewater on Public Golf Course

    Following a one-year investigation, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) concluded that the Southwestern Oklahoma Development Authority ("SWODA") violated the Clean Water Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act when it fired Gy Bennar for reporting illegal wastewater treatment practices at the golf course where he worked to the Environmental Protection Agency ("EPA") and ...


  • Report from Bangladesh: turning local adaptation lessons into national policy

    How can national policies support communities to adapt to climate change? Across the globe, citizens are working together to safeguard their communities from troubling trends associated with climate change. On the islands of Papua New Guinea, coastal villagers have planted mangroves to stabilize eroding beaches. Along the rivers of Bangladesh, ...

  • Can the World Feed China?

    By Lester R. Brown Overnight, China has become a leading world grain importer, set to buy a staggering 22 million tons in the 2013–14 trade year, according to the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture projections. As recently as 2006—just eight years ago—China had a grain surplus and was exporting 10 million tons. What caused this dramatic shift? It wasn’t until 20 years ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

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