livestock pest News

  • £6m funding to improve UK livestock health

    Funding for eight projects that aim to improve the health of livestock within the UK has been announced by the Animal Health Research Club (ARC). The club, whose members include Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) and other industry organisations, has allocated over £6 million in the second round of funding. In total, £10.8 million of ARC grant funding has ...

  • Targeting total eradication of a devastating livestock disease

    The world can definitively stamp out a plague that devastates sheep and goats, freeing hundreds of millions of rural families from one of the major risks to their food security and livelihood. FAO and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) will outline a strategy for the total eradication of Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) by 2030 at a an international conference starting today in ...

  • Insect-eating bats save global maize farmers €0.91 billion a year from crop damage

    Insect-eating bats are estimated to be worth US$ 1 billion (€0.91 billion) a year to maize farmers around the world, a new study has revealed. Not only do bats reduce crop damage by eating adult corn earworm crop pests, they also suppress fungal infections in maize ears. Bats and their habitats need to be better protected for their ecological and economic contributions, say the study’s ...

  • Nitrogen fertiliser `could prevent locust swarms`

    A surprising finding promises a cheap and environmentally friendly way of controlling locust swarms, a major plague that devastates crops around the world. Land erosion caused by heavy livestock grazing promotes ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Senegal nears first victory in war on tsetse fly

    A campaign against the tsetse fly, a pest that transmits a disease that devastates livestock, in the Niayes area near the capital Dakar has radically reduced the fly population and is paving the way for complete eradication. "Since the project started, there is already less disease. It has not only reduced the tsetse but also ticks, which cause lots of other diseases in the area. We have noticed ...

  • Don’t bring me back – buy me in the uk

    More than 50 people a day have illegal foods seized at ports and airports when entering the UK, the latest figures show. More than 21,200 illegal personal food items, such as meat and dairy products, brought in from non-EU countries were seized by UK enforcement agencies such as the UK Border Agency last year, under EU rules intended to protect people, livestock and crops from exotic ...

  • Government warns against bringing food back from the hajj

    Every year around 20,000 British Muslims travel to Mecca for Hajj, but many may be unwittingly bringing illegal food items back into the country on their return. More than 50 people a day have illegal foods seized at ports and airports when entering the UK and the Government is asking Muslims returning from the Hajj to leave meat and dairy behind in Saudi Arabia. It is against the law to ...

  • 12 Innovations to combat drought, improve food security, and stabilize food prices

    Soaring temperatures and low precipitation could not occur at a worse time for many farmers in the United States. Intensifying drought conditions are affecting corn and soybean crops throughout the Midwest, raising grain prices as well as concerns about future food prices. The U.S. Drought Monitor reports that 88 percent of this year’s corn crop and 77 percent of the soybean crop are now ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Spurred by warming climate - beetles threaten coffee crops

    The highlands of southwestern Ethiopia should be ideal for growing coffee. After all, this is the region where coffee first originated hundreds of years ago. But although coffee remains Ethiopia's number one export, the nation's coffee farmers have been struggling. The Arabica coffee grown in Ethiopia and Latin America is an especially climate-sensitive crop. It requires just the right amount of ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Crop breeding gets boost from sweet potatoes

    In Uganda, the sweet potato is a major staple crop. Behind China and Nigeria, Uganda produces the most sweet potatoes in the world. Nationwide, families grow the crop to feed themselves, their livestock and to use as a source of income. Small scale agricultural operations use a large number of sweet potato varieties in their planting. These varieties are steadily being lost due to weevils, sweet ...

  • New plant varieties developed to thrive despite climate change

    Nuclear technology is helping scientists unmask the hidden potential in plants, allowing plant breeders to develop new crop varieties that can withstand external stress such as drought, often brought about by climate change. Experts believe that climate change will affect the suitability of land for different types of crops, livestock, fish and pasture. It will also have an impact on the health ...

  • Overseas Lab Seeks U.S. Weed Control `Recruits`

    The search is on for insects, mites, microbes or nematodes that could be used in a biologically based approach to controlling silverleaf nightshade, an invasive weed from the Americas that has spread to southern Europe, Africa, India, Australia and elsewhere. According to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologist Walker Jones, the perennial weed, Solanum elaeagnifolium, is being targeted ...

  • South Sudan facing major food and nutrition crisis

    FAO today warned of a major food security and nutrition crisis in South Sudan, where some 3.7 million people are now facing acute or emergency levels of food insecurity. The Organization is calling for $77 million for critical food security and livelihood support for the crisis-affected population as prices of staple crops soar and basic commodities run out. UN agencies and NGOs have revised a ...

  • Supporting climate-friendly food production

    This summer, record temperatures and limited rainfall parched vast areas of U.S. cropland, and with Earth’s surface air temperature projected to rise 0.69 degrees Celsius by 2030, global food production will be even more unpredictable, according to new research conducted by the Worldwatch Institute (www.worldwatch.org). Although agriculture is a major driver of ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Crunching genomes to boost animal health

    FAO has chosen the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics as a designated reference centre to expand its access to state-of the-art technology in combating dangerous viral infections, including avian influenza and foot-and-mouth disease, in farm animals and wildlife. The SIB is equipped with high performance computers, ...

  • United Kingdom contributes to FAO’s work in Syria and Lebanon

    The United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID) is donating £10 million to FAO humanitarian projects in Syria and Lebanon. Part of the United Kingdom’s contribution will go towards boosting winter wheat and barley production in Syria, where more than 4 million people are food insecure. Ongoing conflict has hit food production in the country. Many farmers had ...

  • Overcoming Smallholder Challenges with Biotechnology

    A new FAO publication calls for greater national and international efforts to bring agricultural biotechnologies to smallholder producers in developing countries. The publication, Biotechnologies at Work for Smallholders: Case Studies from Developing Countries in Crops, Livestock and Fish, asserts biotechnologies can help ...

  • Northeast Family Farmers Squeezed By Climate Change

    ITHACA, New York, July 13, 2007 (ENS) - While a warmer climate will trigger a longer growing season and the opportunity to experiment with new crops in the Northeast, 'it will also open the door to invasion by new and aggressive crop pests, damaging summer heat stress and serious challenges with water management,' warns David Wolfe, a Cornell University expert on the effects of climate change on ...

  • Cassava`s huge potential as 21st Century crop

    Save and Grow, an environmentally-friendly farming model promoted by FAO, can sustainably increase cassava yields by up to 400 percent and help turn this staple from a poor people's food into a 21st Century crop, FAO said today. In a newly-published field guide detailing Save and Grow's applications to cassava smallholder production, FAO noted that global cassava output has increased by 60 ...

  • Protected birds threatened by poisoned prey

    Rodents poisoned by pest control substances may pose a threat to protected birds if the carcasses are not removed quickly enough. A new study found that dead water voles on farmland were scavenged rapidly by red kites and buzzards, suggesting that regular removal is needed to reduce poisoning risks. Chemical poisons are often used to control rodent populations on farms, where the animals destroy ...

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