livestock pest control News

  • Targeting total eradication of a devastating livestock disease

    The world can definitively stamp out a plague that devastates sheep and goats, freeing hundreds of millions of rural families from one of the major risks to their food security and livelihood. FAO and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) will outline a strategy for the total eradication of Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) by 2030 at a an international conference starting today in ...

  • £6m funding to improve UK livestock health

    Funding for eight projects that aim to improve the health of livestock within the UK has been announced by the Animal Health Research Club (ARC). The club, whose members include Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) and other industry organisations, has allocated over £6 million in the second round of funding. In total, £10.8 million of ARC grant funding has ...

  • Overseas Lab Seeks U.S. Weed Control `Recruits`

    The search is on for insects, mites, microbes or nematodes that could be used in a biologically based approach to controlling silverleaf nightshade, an invasive weed from the Americas that has spread to southern Europe, Africa, India, Australia and elsewhere. According to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologist Walker Jones, the perennial weed, Solanum elaeagnifolium, is being targeted ...

  • Insect-eating bats save global maize farmers €0.91 billion a year from crop damage

    Insect-eating bats are estimated to be worth US$ 1 billion (€0.91 billion) a year to maize farmers around the world, a new study has revealed. Not only do bats reduce crop damage by eating adult corn earworm crop pests, they also suppress fungal infections in maize ears. Bats and their habitats need to be better protected for their ecological and economic contributions, say the study’s ...

  • Nitrogen fertiliser `could prevent locust swarms`

    A surprising finding promises a cheap and environmentally friendly way of controlling locust swarms, a major plague that devastates crops around the world. Land erosion caused by heavy livestock grazing promotes ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Senegal nears first victory in war on tsetse fly

    A campaign against the tsetse fly, a pest that transmits a disease that devastates livestock, in the Niayes area near the capital Dakar has radically reduced the fly population and is paving the way for complete eradication. "Since the project started, there is already less disease. It has not only reduced the tsetse but also ticks, which cause lots of other diseases in the area. We have noticed ...

  • Don’t bring me back – buy me in the uk

    More than 50 people a day have illegal foods seized at ports and airports when entering the UK, the latest figures show. More than 21,200 illegal personal food items, such as meat and dairy products, brought in from non-EU countries were seized by UK enforcement agencies such as the UK Border Agency last year, under EU rules intended to protect people, livestock and crops from exotic ...

  • 12 Innovations to combat drought, improve food security, and stabilize food prices

    Soaring temperatures and low precipitation could not occur at a worse time for many farmers in the United States. Intensifying drought conditions are affecting corn and soybean crops throughout the Midwest, raising grain prices as well as concerns about future food prices. The U.S. Drought Monitor reports that 88 percent of this year’s corn crop and 77 percent of the soybean crop are now ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Protected birds threatened by poisoned prey

    Rodents poisoned by pest control substances may pose a threat to protected birds if the carcasses are not removed quickly enough. A new study found that dead water voles on farmland were scavenged rapidly by red kites and buzzards, suggesting that regular removal is needed to reduce poisoning risks. Chemical poisons are often used to control rodent populations on farms, where the animals destroy ...

  • Disruptive changes coming in technologies of food production, finds report

    Changes in the way food is grown will soon represent risk to existing dominant players worldwide and create new opportunities in agriculture, a new report finds. Increasing population, climate change, rising fossil fuel prices, ecosystem degradation and water and land scarcity are making today's food production methods increasingly unsustainable and driving important new innovation in ...


    By Kachan & Co.

  • Pollinators vital to our food supply under threat

    A growing number of pollinator species worldwide are being driven toward extinction by diverse pressures, many of them human-made, threatening millions of livelihoods and hundreds of billions of dollars worth of food supplies, according to the first global assessment of pollinators. However, the assessment, a two-year study conducted and released today by the Intergovernmental ...

  • UF/IFAS battling a disease devastating to deer farms and cows

    The Florida legislature recently allocated $2 million a year for the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences to study Hemorrhagic disease, a virus which affects deer and can cross over into cattle, causing concern among Florida ranchers and prompting UF researchers to look for preventions and a cure. “For deer farming to remain a viable industry, and to ...

  • USDA Grants Support Organic Agriculture Research

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today awarded five grants to support research, education and Extension programs that will improve the competitiveness of organic livestock and crop producers. "The organic industry is a rapidly growing segment of American agriculture and it is important we continue to invest in sound science to support ...

  • Four new Africa Solidarity Trust Fund projects will benefit 24 countries

    The FAO-managed Africa Solidarity Trust Fund today gave a green light to four new, continent-spanning projects at a ceremony during the African Union Summit, being held here this week. The President of Equatorial Guinea, Obiang Nguema Mbasogo, a key supporter of the fund, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon, and FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva were in attendance. The projects, ...

  • Rural India left out of S&T system

    Scientific research in India needs to integrate better with rural development issues say Rajeswari S. Raina and Kasturi Mandal. India’s Prime Minister Manmohan Singh promised in January 2012 a massive expansion of funding and facilities for Indian science. The 12th Five-Year Plan (2012–2017) pledges inclusive development through scientific knowledge and technological ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Reality check for `miracle` biofuel crop

    The hardy jatropha tree as a biofuel source may not be the panacea for smallholders that some have claimed, say Miyuki Iiyama and James Onchieku. It sounds too good to be true: a biofuel crop that grows on semi-arid lands and degraded soils, replaces fossil fuels in developing countries and brings huge injections of cash to poor smallholders. That is what some are claiming for Jatropha curcas, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • New Cassava varieties promise food security in Zanzibar

    Millions of cassava farmers in eastern and central Africa are in distress from viral cassava diseases that are sweeping across the region and ravaging their crops. But their counterparts on the popular tourist island of Zanzibar are undergoing a quiet revolution using new disease-resistant and high-yielding varieties that were introduced three years ago. The four varieties, Kizimbani, Mahonda, ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Keynote Address by Achim Steiner UN Under-Secretary-General and UNEP Executive Director at the Global Forum for Food and Agriculture (GFFA)

    Agriculture is the single most important sector in providing the basic necessities for human existence and livelihoods today. In addition to producing bioenergy and foodstuffs, it accounts for roughly 40 per cent of the world's labour force, or about 1.3 billion people. Honourable Ministers, Distinguished guests, Colleagues, Ladies and ...

  • NRDC announces winners of the 2013 Growing Green Awards

    The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) today celebrates four remarkable food vanguards for their pioneering efforts to create healthier and more sustainable food systems at the fifth annual Growing Green Awards. The winners, who are leaders in tackling antibiotic resistance on farms, infusing urban areas with fresh produce in corner stores, ...

  • Maintaining food crop diversity: an interview with Gary Paul Nabhan

    Guest author Fred Bahnson interviewed Gary Paul Nabhan, a lecturer, food and farming advocate, folklorist, and conservationist who lives and farms in the U.S. Southwest. Nabhan discusses his new book, the future of agriculture, and how 1,400-year-old Lebanese farming techniques influence his land ethic. Tell me about your latest book, Where Our Food Comes From-Retracing Nikolay Vavilov's ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

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