livestock research service News

  • Tracking phosphorus runoff from livestock manure

    Nutrient runoff from livestock manure is a common source of agricultural pollution. Looking for an uncommon solution, a team of scientists has developed an application of rare earth elements to control and track runoff phosphorus from soils receiving livestock manure. In addition to reducing the solubility of phosphorus, this method shows particular promise for researchers interested in tracking ...

  • Targeting total eradication of a devastating livestock disease

    The world can definitively stamp out a plague that devastates sheep and goats, freeing hundreds of millions of rural families from one of the major risks to their food security and livelihood. FAO and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) will outline a strategy for the total eradication of Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) by 2030 at a an international conference starting today in ...

  • Climate change could impact livestock production

    Land used for livestock grazing; referred to range land in the western U.S. and pasture land in the eastern half of the country, encompasses over 584 million acres of non-Federal land and represents a very complex ecosystem. While the intensity of the management of these lands differs from parcel to parcel, there is no doubt they all play a vital role in livestock production. However, little ...

  • Mapping livestock water requirements to inform EU water policy

    Ecosystems provide a range of valuable services relevant to water. Lakes and rivers contribute to water supply, whilst forests and wetlands help protect against flooding and can also remove pollutants such as heavy metals ...

  • Protecting livestock and wildlife through transfrontier conservation areas: an interview with Steve Osofsky

    Steve Osofsky, director of wildlife health policy for the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), developed the Animal & Human Health for the Environment And Development (AHEAD) program at WCS and served as the first wildlife veterinary officer for the Botswana Department of Wildlife and National ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Food security in East Africa gets research boost

    A consortium of East African institutes is researching new seed varieties better suited to dry areas to combat the effects of climate change in the region. The partnership, comprising seven universities and institutes in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, and funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, will also disseminate technical ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Research funding and skills key to food for post-2015

    Public spending on agricultural research must double in the next decade if the world is to successfully move to sustainable methods of ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Meat and Poultry Research Showcase Scheduled for 2014 IPPE

    As part of the 2014 International Production & Processing Expo (IPPE) education schedule, the Meat and Poultry Research Showcase will provide cutting-edge scientific presentations in practical applied ways, exploring the latest research in the meat and poultry industry. The Showcase will be held from 8 a.m. – 12 p.m. on Thursday, Jan 30. The registration fee for the program is $150 for ...

  • USDA Grants Support Organic Agriculture Research

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today awarded five grants to support research, education and Extension programs that will improve the competitiveness of organic livestock and crop producers. "The organic industry is a rapidly growing segment of American agriculture and it is important we continue to invest in sound science to support ...

  • Africa and India cultivate agricultural research ties

    Africa and India are gearing up to further enhance cooperation in agricultural science, technology and innovation, and move beyond dialogue to a range of practical options from a virtual biotech platform to ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • USDA and DOE award biomass research and development grants to reduce America`s reliance on imported oil

    As part of the Obama Administration's comprehensive plan to address rising gas prices, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced a total of $47 million to fund eight research and development projects that will support the production of biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products from a variety of biomass sources. These investments in ...


    By US Department of Energy

  • Organic Transitions Program (ORG)

    The overall goal of the Organic Transitions Program (ORG) is to support the development and implementation of research, extension and higher education programs to improve the competitiveness of organic livestock and crop producers, as well as those who are adopting organic practices. In FY 2010, ORG will focus on environmental services provided by organic farming systems that support soil ...

  • Tannins` Surprising Benefits for Soils, Forests and Farms

    The tannins that help make good red wine and bright fall colors also may help make good soil and healthy livestock, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) researchers. Chemist Javier Gonzalez and soil scientist Jonathan Halvorson, both at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Appalachian Farming Systems Research Center (AFSRC) in Beaver, W.Va., are leading a tannin research project ...

  • Bringing nitrogen out to pasture

    Cows in Brazil might start bellowing "leguuume" rather than "moo." That's because Jose Dubeux Jr. wants to plant more legume trees in cow pastures. Dubeux is an assistant professor of Agronomy at North Florida Research & Education Center. Growing up, Dubeux spent a lot of time on his grandparents' farm in Brazil. There he developed a passion for livestock operations and the grasslands on ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • On horizon 2050 - billions needed for agriculture

    Net investments of $83 billion a year must be made in agriculture in developing countries if there is to be enough food to feed 9.1 billion people in 2050, according to an FAO discussion paper published today.  Agricultural investment thus needs to increase by about 50 percent, according to the paper prepared for the High Level Experts’ Forum on How to Feed the World in 2050, Rome 12-13 ...

  • Edible insects inch one step closer

    Farming insects on a large scale is no more of a biological or chemical hazard than other livestock farming, says a report by a European food safety body. The report, which looks at the potential of insects as food or animal feed, says the microbiological, chemical and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Tall fescue toxicosis and management

    Tall fescue toxicosis is one of the most devastating problems facing forage-livestock agriculture. While there is currently no cure for this costly disorder, there are proven management strategies to lessen the impact of toxicosis. A new professional guide, Tall Fescue Toxicosis and Management is now available to livestock producers and land managers who want to better understand and control ...

  • 12 Innovations to combat drought, improve food security, and stabilize food prices

    Soaring temperatures and low precipitation could not occur at a worse time for many farmers in the United States. Intensifying drought conditions are affecting corn and soybean crops throughout the Midwest, raising grain prices as well as concerns about future food prices. The U.S. Drought Monitor reports that 88 percent of this year’s corn crop and 77 percent of the soybean crop are now ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Overseas Lab Seeks U.S. Weed Control `Recruits`

    The search is on for insects, mites, microbes or nematodes that could be used in a biologically based approach to controlling silverleaf nightshade, an invasive weed from the Americas that has spread to southern Europe, Africa, India, Australia and elsewhere. According to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologist Walker Jones, the perennial weed, Solanum elaeagnifolium, is being targeted ...

  • Proposed rule for farms aims to improve Lake Erie

    Ohio's lawmakers are taking their first step toward slowing the spread of algae in Lake Erie since a toxin contaminated the drinking water for more than 400,000 people. Legislation approved in the state House would ban farmers in much of northwestern Ohio from spreading manure on top of frozen or saturated fields. Another provision would set new rules on dumping dredged sediment in the lake. Both ...


    By Associated Press

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