major field crop News

  • Cereal Crops Feeling the Heat

    LIVERMORE, California (ENS) - Warming temperatures since 1981 have caused annual losses of about US$5 billion for six major cereal crops, new research has found. This is the first study to estimate how much global food production already has been affected by climate change. From 1981 to 2002, fields of wheat, corn and barley throughout the world have produced a combined 40 million ...

  • Soil phosphorus in an organic cropping system

    Phosphorus is a nonrenewable resource, raising concerns that agricultural practices may deplete reserves. (For one overview discussion of phosphorus, see Phosphorus Famine: The Threat to Our Food Supply in the June 2009 Scientific American.) Organic farming with low phosphorus  inputs can result in deficient levels of plant-available phosphorus (available-P).A group of researchers from ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Helping farmers export `forgotten` crops

    In a global first, over 300 crop safety and pesticide management officials and other experts are meeting this week at FAO to discuss challenges associated with pesticide use on 'speciality crops' like garlic, ginger and chilies. The event starts today and runs through December 7. Unlike large-area crops such as corn, wheat, cotton or rice, specialty crops have traditionally been produced in ...

  • Can GM crops feed the hungry?

    Golden Rice burst into the public imagination a decade ago, in the form of a cover article in Time magazine that claimed the genetically modified (GM) rice could 'save a million kids a year'. The rice gets its golden hue from an excess of beta carotene, a precursor to vitamin A that could help half a million children who go blind each year from an often-fatal vitamin A deficiency. But ten years ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • National Survey on Cover Crops Seeks Farmer Participation

    Farmers are invited to share their thoughts on cover crops—whether or not they use cover crops themselves—in a national survey, now in its third year of collecting valuable data on the increasingly popular management practice. The results, which will be released this summer, will help growers, researchers, agricultural advisors, ag retailers and policymakers more effectively address ...

  • Bee pollination improves crop quality as well as quantity

    Bee pollination improves the shape, weight and shelf-life of strawberries, contributing a staggering €1.05 billion to the European strawberry market per year, new research suggests. By blocking bees from a set of plants, the researchers demonstrated the substantial effects of bee pollination on the quality of the fruit. It is well established that insect pollination increases the quantity of ...

  • Cassava`s huge potential as 21st Century crop

    Save and Grow, an environmentally-friendly farming model promoted by FAO, can sustainably increase cassava yields by up to 400 percent and help turn this staple from a poor people's food into a 21st Century crop, FAO said today. In a newly-published field guide detailing Save and Grow's applications to cassava smallholder production, FAO noted that global cassava output has increased by 60 ...

  • ARS plant collections help safeguard crops

    In the months ahead, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists plan to collect walnuts from Kyrgyzstan, grasses from Russia, and carrots and sunflowers from fields across the Southeastern United States in efforts that will enhance one of the nation's most effective tools for protecting the food supply. Researchers will make the trips to collect plants with useful ...

  • Spurred by warming climate - beetles threaten coffee crops

    The highlands of southwestern Ethiopia should be ideal for growing coffee. After all, this is the region where coffee first originated hundreds of years ago. But although coffee remains Ethiopia's number one export, the nation's coffee farmers have been struggling. The Arabica coffee grown in Ethiopia and Latin America is an especially climate-sensitive crop. It requires just the right amount of ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Crop-mapping drones win MIT $100K

    Original story at MIT News Drones are positioned to change people’s lives, with tech giants building unpiloted aerial vehicles to deliver packages to homes or provide Internet access across the globe.   Using that idea as a jumping-off point, RaptorMaps, an MIT team ...

  • CJP Finds Moringa & Flaxseed Couple Oil Crops

    Moringa homeland, India is all set to demonstrate the Genetics Agronomics and Horticulture advancement in moringa cultivation in upcoming GLOBAL MORINGA MEET 2012 from November 25-26, 2012 at Jaipur. With an effort to ‘grow beyond oil ‘, apart from Jatropha, CJP has been engaged in�� development of products that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future ...


    By Advanced Biofuel Center

  • Uganda starts `historic` trials on GM staple crops

    Ugandan researchers will carry out a series of field trials on some of the major food crops that have been genetically modified (GM), following several recent approvals by the Uganda National Biosafety Committee, despite a lack of clear legislation on commercialising any such products within the country. They will seek to develop both transgenic and conventional maize varieties tolerant to ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • App ‘trained’ to spot crop disease, alert farmers

    Researchers win grant to further test app for smallholders App diagnoses deadly cassava diseases in field, sends alerts Roll-out in Africa needs engagement with farmers, says expert A team of scientists has received US$100,000 grant to refine a mobile application (app) that ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Rise in CO2 could restrict growing days for crops

    The positive consequences of climate change may not be so positive. Although plants in the colder regions are expected to thrive as average global temperatures rise, even this benefit could be limited. Some tropical regions could lose up to 200 growing days a year, and more than two billion rural people could see their hopes wither on the vine or in the field. Even in temperate zones, there will ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Wild Bee Decline Threatens U.S. Crop Production

    The first national study to map U.S. wild bees suggests they’re disappearing in many of the country’s most important farmlands — including California’s Central Valley, the Midwest’s corn belt and the Mississippi River valley. If losses of these crucial pollinators continue, the new nationwide assessment indicates that farmers will face increasing costs — and ...


    By University of Vermont

  • Global Crop Protection Industry Outlook to 2016 - Bio-pesticides: The Next Generation Crop Protection Products

    Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Global Crop Protection Industry Outlook to 2016 - Bio-pesticides: The Next Generation Crop Protection Products ...


    By ReportLinker

  • Valmont Acquires Majority Stake in AgSense, a Leading Agricultural Technology Company

    Valmont Industries, Inc. (NYSE: VMI), a leading global provider of engineered products and services for infrastructure and mechanized irrigation equipment for agriculture, announced today that it has acquired a majority interest in South Dakota-based AgSense (www.agsense.net). The acquisition further extends Valmont’s industry-leading offerings in remote monitoring and control technology ...


  • Pests, Weeds and Crop Diseases Arriving Early You are here

    A warmer than usual winter and wet spring are ushering in some crop diseases and weeds early in the season and could trigger a pestier summer. Ohio State University entomologists are keeping a close eye on insect species that survived the winter and may appear earlier and more abundantly. Particularly concerning are the pests that preyed on last year’s crops, including slugs, stink bugs and ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Floods wash away Pakistan`s crop research efforts

    The recent Pakistan floods have caused substantial damage to the country's crop research, washing away new seed varieties and test crops planted in the fields, and damaging buildings and equipment, leaving the country's research institutes in disrepair. So far, the floods have killed more than 2,000 people and affected a further 21 million, killed 200,000 livestock and destroyed 4.25 million ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Neonicotinoids: may reduce crop yields by poisoning insects that eat slug pests

    Beetles that are helpful to farmers can be poisoned if they feed on slugs that have eaten crops treated with neonicotinoids, a new study reports. The slugs themselves are not harmed by neonicotinoids. In American field trials, researchers found that plots planted with neonicotinoid-treated soybeans contained more slugs, fewer beetle predators and had 5% lower yields. The insecticide may be ...

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