manure spreading runoff News

  • Manure `smells like money` as energy costs rise

    With energy prices driving the cost of agricultural inputs up, nutrient-rich manure is getting another look. 'Calls to Extension offices from people looking for manure and manure compost have increased in recent months,' says Tommy Bass, Montana State University Extension livestock environment associate specialist. Bass said that this shift in perception is good for water quality, too. 'As manure ...

  • Tillage and reduced-input rotations affect runoff from agricultural fields

    A new study from researchers at the USDA Agricultural Research Service provides information about runoff under different management practices and can help farmers choose the practice that is best for them. No-till management practices can reduce soil erosion, but evidence suggests they can also lead to increased runoff of dissolved phosphorus from soil surfaces. Meanwhile, farmers looking ...

  • New Poultry Litter Applicator Can Cut Nutrient Runoff, Protect Water Quality

    Researchers will demonstrate a prototype farm implement that slashes nutrient runoff and bacterial contamination from poultry litter at this year’s Manure Science Review. Co-hosted by Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Manure Science Review Slated Aug. 12: How to Maximize Crop Benefits, Minimize Water Risks

    Manure Science Review this year will have a clear focus on water. The annual learning event will present more than a dozen sessions on getting the most from the nutrients in manure while limiting the chance of them reaching lakes and streams. It’s for farmers and others in the industry. “Manure is an excellent soil amendment and provides nutrients for crop growth,” said  ...


    By Ohio State University

  • American society of agronomy

    Recycling manure is an important practice, especially for large livestock producers. Manure can be used as fertilizer to aid in crop production, aiding livestock producers that grow their own feed crops. While manure does provide a rich nutrient source for crops, it also can contribute to nutrient leaching and runoff. This can contaminate the surrounding ecosystem and lead to eutrophication of ...

  • EPA unveils new permit for concentrated animal feeding operations to protect water quality in Idaho

    A new water discharge permit for Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) will help protect Idaho’s rivers, lakes and streams from animal waste, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Boise, Idaho. The new EPA "General Permit” regulates discharges to surface waters from most Idaho CAFOs, including those on tribal lands. The permit covers a wide array of Idaho ...

  • Defra publishes revised nitrate regulations and maps

    Defra has published regulations extending the areas of England designated as Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZs) from 55% to around 70%. This reflects the Government’s decision to continue designating the zones on a selective basis rather than adopt the whole territory approach of some Member States. The Regulations also make changes to the Action Programme specifying actions which farmers in ...

  • New Process Converts Poultry Litter into Bio-oil

    BLACKSBURG, Virginia, August 29, 2007 (ENS) - Each year in the United States the poultry industry produces more than 5.6 million tons of litter - a mixture of bedding, manure, feathers, and spilled feed. Now, a team of researchers in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Virginia Tech is developing transportable pyrolysis units that will convert poultry litter into bio-oil that can be ...

  • Ohio asks Neighboring States to Help Fight Lake Erie`s Algae

    Pollutants feeding the toxic algae blooms that have been turning parts of western Lake Erie green and contaminating drinking water in recent summers aren't just coming from Ohio. They're flowing into the lake from farm fields in Michigan and Indiana, leaky septic tanks in southern Canada, and Detroit's wastewater plant. That's why Ohio's governor and environmental chief are starting to ask some ...


    By Associated Press

  • Fish farming finds its way to land-locked Midwest

     The latest of five generations who have worked the same ground in northeastern Nebraska, 52-year-old Scott Garwood, isn't growing corn or cattle - it's fish. Specifically, thousands of an Australian freshwater species called barramundi - often dubbed Asian sea bass because of its similar sweet, white flaky flesh - in large tanks inside a warehouse. With global consumption of seafood ...


    By Associated Press

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