marine aquaculture genetic News

  • Fish farming finds its way to land-locked Midwest

     The latest of five generations who have worked the same ground in northeastern Nebraska, 52-year-old Scott Garwood, isn't growing corn or cattle - it's fish. Specifically, thousands of an Australian freshwater species called barramundi - often dubbed Asian sea bass because of its similar sweet, white flaky flesh - in large tanks inside a warehouse. With global consumption of seafood ...


    By Associated Press

  • MSC and ASC sign MOU and commit to explore further opportunities to add value to partners

    The Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) and Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) furthering their collaboration and commitment to find additional efficiencies and added value for partners handling both ASC and MSC certified products. Rupert Howes, CEO of the MSC said: “The MSC and ASC share a common heritage and vision that global ...

  • World fisheries must prepare for climate change

    The fishing industry and national fisheries authorities must do more to understand and prepare for the impacts that climate change will have on world fisheries, says a new FAO report published today. According to the latest edition of the UN agency's The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture (SOFIA), existing responsible fishing practices need to be more widely implemented and current ...

  • Aura Sustainability EPA Submission to the King Salmon Proposal

    Firstly we would like to start by saying we are big fans of Marlborough farmed Salmon and regularly purchase, cook and eat it.  It is a world class product and one that Marlborough should be proud of producing.  It also goes rather well with our other world renowned product, Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc.  We are also advocates of sustainable growth for the Marlborough region and its ...


    By Aura Sustainability

  • First-ever federal rules for offshore fish farming issued

    The first-ever federal regulations for large-scale fish farming in the ocean were issued Monday, opening a new frontier in the harvesting of popular seafood species such as red drum, tuna and red snapper. The new rules allow the farming of fish in federal waters of the Gulf of Mexico. The rules - in the making for years - were announced in New ...


    By Associated Press

  • Surrogate sushi: Japan biotech for bluefin tuna

    Of all the overfished fish in the seas, luscious, fatty bluefin tuna are among the most threatened. Marine scientist Goro Yamazaki, who is known in this seaside community as "Young Mr. Fish," is working to ensure the species survives. Yamazaki is fine-tuning a technology to use mackerel surrogates to spawn the bluefin, a process he hopes will enable fisheries to raise the huge, torpedo-shaped ...


    By Associated Press

  • Report on Health and Biodiversity Demonstrates Human Health Benefits from Protecting Biodiversity

    A ground-breaking report on biodiversity and health, launched today at the 14th World Congress on Public Health, in Kolkata, India, shows the significant contribution of biodiversity and ecosystem services to better human health. The report, Connecting Global Priorities: Biodiversity and Human Health, demonstrates that the relationship between biodiversity and human health is extensive and ...

  • Alternative Fuels Americas Completes Management Build-Up With Two Notable Appointments

    Alternative Fuels Americas, Inc. (PINKSHEETS: AFAI) announced today that Dr. Sam Stern and Dr. W. Wayne Surles have joined the Company's management team as Chief Operating Officer and Director of Research & Development, respectively, effective immediately. Dr. Stern has a Ph.D. in the Life Sciences from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He has served as General Manager for one of Continental ...


    By Marketwire

  • As seas rise, saltwater plants offer hope farms will survive

    On a sun-scorched wasteland near India's southern tip, an unlikely garden filled with spiky shrubs and spindly greens is growing, seemingly against all odds. The plants are living on saltwater, coping with drought and possibly offering viable farming alternatives for a future in which rising seas have inundated countless coastal farmlands. Sea rise, one of the consequences of climate change, now ...


    By Associated Press

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