natural pesticide News

  • Cement develops an appetite for C02

    Three new studies illuminate the sheer complexity of the aspect of climate science known as the carbon cycle − how carbon dioxide gets into the atmosphere and out again. Sometimes, human agency is at work, but nature takes care of it anyway – as one of the studies reveals in the case of cement, the world’s most widely-used building material. Zhu Liu, postdoctoral scholar at ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Pesticides may harm wild bees but natural areas can mitigate effects

    The use of pesticides in orchards may be threatening populations of wild bees, which are important pollinators that increase crop productivity, a new study concludes. However, the damage was mitigated in areas where the orchards were surrounded by natural landscapes, such as deciduous forests. Pollinators, such as bees, provide an important and often underappreciated ecosystem service to ...

  • New rules for pesticides in the EU

    On 23 June, the Agriculture Council agreed a common position on new rules for placing plant protection products on the market in the EU. The objective is to increase protection for human health and the environment and improve the functioning of the internal market. The new regulation will retain the two-tier nature of the present system. Active substances will continue to be approved at EU level ...


    By EU Council of Ministers

  • Cultivation affects pesticide–soil interactions

    Pesticides are often used to enhance crop production by killing unwanted animals or plants. Unfortunately, they can also negatively impact humans and environmental health. The degree of impact, in part, depends on the fate and behavior of pesticides in the environment. The latter is governed by complex interactions of pesticides with soil components. One such important interaction is sorption of ...

  • Pesticide drift is persistent problem for farmers

    The cloud of insecticide that drifted from a neighbor's corn field onto the asparagus on Andrew and Melissa Dunham's central Iowa farm cast a shadow over their organic vegetable business. They say the costs from the incident and resulting loss of organic certification on their asparagus patch for three years will reach about $74,000, and they're now working with the sprayer's insurance company. ...


    By Associated Press

  • Organic pesticides may not always be the best choice

    Organic pesticides may not always be the most environmentally-friendly choice of pest control, according to recent research. Two new synthetic pesticides for controlling aphids were found to be less harmful to other species and more efficient than the two new organic pesticides tested in the study. It is often thought that newer organic and natural pesticides are uniformly safer and therefore ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Eucalyptus essential oil as an alternative to chemical pesticides

    Controlling pests with natural products can have greater environmental benefits than using chemical pesticides. A recent study reviews the use of eucalyptus essential oil as a natural pesticide and offers recommendations for its future application. Chemical pesticides have played a major role in securing food supplies the world over. However, excessive use has led to increased environmental ...

  • Bees actively prefer nectar contaminated with neonicotinoid pesticides

    Honeybees and bumblebees prefer feeding on nectar laced with certain neonicotinoid pesticides to uncontaminated food, new research has shown. Far from the predictions of some, that bees would avoid food contaminated with neonicotinoid pesticides if given the choice, a new study has shown that bees did not avoid any of the three most common neonicotinoids: imidacloprid, thiamethoxam or ...

  • Growing need to revamp national laws governing pesticides

    Some thirty years to the day after FAO first launched its International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides, the UN food agency is calling on countries to make sure that national regulatory frameworks governing the management of pesticides are kept up to ...

  • Farmers Urged to Consider Impact Of Pesticides on Insect Numbers

    Farmers are continually urged to store pesticides safely and securely in order to minimise their impact on the environment and to reduce leakage into water supplies and systems. A study by the Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust (GWCT), with support from Natural England, examined 40 year’s worth of data collected on farmland on the Susses Downs.  Examining the effect of climate and ...


    By ENDURAMAXX

  • Organic pesticides not always greener choice, study finds

    A new University of Guelph study reveals some organic pesticides can have a higher environmental impact than conventional pesticides because the organic product may require larger doses. Environmental sciences professor Rebecca Hallett and PhD candidate Christine Bahlai compared the effectiveness and environmental impact of organic pesticides to those of conventional and novel reduced-risk ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Pesticides, Fertilizers Linked to U.S. Premature Births

    INDIANAPOLIS, Indiana (ENS) - The rising premature birth rate in the United States is associated with increased use of pesticides and fertilizers containing nitrates, according to research by a professor of clinical pediatrics at the Indiana University School of Medicine. Paul Winchester, MD, reports his findings today at the Pediatric Academic Societies' annual meeting in ...

  • Fungi and roundworms as non-chemical substitutes for pesticides

    The use of some pesticides is a recognised concern for health and the environment. A new UK study identifies some naturally occurring alternatives to control wireworm, a widespread pest of potatoes. The wireworm causes major problems in arable crops, including potatoes, in many parts of the world. Wireworms are the larvae of click beetles. Their damage to potatoes can drastically reduce yield. ...

  • WSSA Pesticide Stewardship Series: Certification Programs Fulfill an Essential Need for Competent Pesticide Applicators

    Recently, an employee of an aerial application company was penalized for applying an agricultural pesticide without following all label directions and without the required applicator certification. In a separate case, a forest service company making an urban application was also fined for pesticide label violations and lack of certification. Certain pesticide products must be applied by or under ...


    By PRWeb

  • WSSA Pesticide Stewardship Series: Employers Play a Central Role in Protecting Agricultural Workers and Pesticide Handlers

    An employer was fined recently after an inspection showed pesticide application information wasn’t posted at the job site, and an employee applied a pesticide without safety training or personal protective equipment (PPE). The posting, safety training and PPE are all required under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Agricultural Worker Protection Standard (WPS). “The WPS ...

  • WSSA Pesticide Stewardship Series: Restricted Use Pesticides Require an Extra Level of Care

    The owner of a horticultural company was fined recently for using a restricted use pesticide (RUP) in ways that were inconsistent with the product label. The product’s use was restricted due to human health concerns, but workers had applied the product without proper training or the required personal protective equipment (PPE). In another recent case, a company was fined because it failed to ...


    By PRWeb

  • Nutrients in streams can mask toxic effects of pesticides on aquatic life

    Moderate levels of nitrogen in streams and rivers can make it difficult to assess the effects of pesticides on aquatic wildlife, because nutrients mask the pesticides’ impacts, according to recent research. This highlights the importance of considering nutrient levels when developing measures to protect aquatic ecosystems. Freshwater organisms are exposed to a number of natural and ...

  • Poison pulled: bee toxic pesticide removed from store shelves

    After rounds of legal wrangling in federal court, a bee-toxic pesticide may no longer be sold or distributed because it entered the marketplace illegally. Bayer CropScience’s pesticide spirotetramat (trade-named Movento, Ultor, and Kontos) is now illegal to buy, sell, or transport in the United States after NRDC and Xerces Society successfully argued that it was approved through a flawed ...

  • Greenpeace welcomes another step in taking action on bee-killing pesticide

    A European Commission proposal to restrict the use of a pesticide that has been shown to kill bees received the support of a strong majority of EU country representatives today. 23 EU member states voted in favour of a partial ban on the chemical, with only 2 against and 3 abstaining [1]. Greenpeace believes that the proposed ban will not be enough to allow for bee recovery and that only a full ...


    By Greenpeace International

  • EU Pesticide Legislation Could Cost UK Farming £905 Million

    Proposed European pesticide legislation could cost UK industry in excess of £905 million, according to Farmers Guardian. The legislation aims to tighten up pesticide regulations and the definition of endocrine distributors and could end up costing the UK agricultural sector hegely. A report commissioned by AHDB assessed the financial impact of the loss of crop protection active substances ...


    By ENDURAMAXX

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