pea harvester News

  • Pigeon pea genome sequence could boost yields

    More than a billion people could soon benefit from improved yields of the important drought-resistant crop pigeon pea now that its genome has been sequenced by a global partnership. The sequence, published online in Nature Biotechnology last week (6 November), should cut the time it takes to develop higher-yielding pigeon pea varieties from the 6–10 years required for traditional breeding ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Rome-based UN agencies join forces on food losses

    The UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the World Food Programme (WFP) have launched a joint project to tackle the global problem of food losses. Around one-third of all food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted each year, amounting to 1.3 billion tonnes - or enough food to feed 2 billion people. The three UN ...

  • Africa, India to boost agricultural technology cooperation

    [CHENNAI] Africa and India will boost cooperation in agricultural technologies for smallholder farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa, with a view to achieving food security by 2015. The Hyderabad-based International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the European Market Research Centre (EMRC) this month, to facilitate ICRISAT's ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Soil phosphorus in an organic cropping system

    Phosphorus is a nonrenewable resource, raising concerns that agricultural practices may deplete reserves. (For one overview discussion of phosphorus, see Phosphorus Famine: The Threat to Our Food Supply in the June 2009 Scientific American.) Organic farming with low phosphorus  inputs can result in deficient levels of plant-available phosphorus (available-P).A group of researchers from ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Let`s do more than give thanks for our abundance

    With the amount of food produced in our country, every day could be Thanksgiving. For this November feast we cook more than 45 million turkeys, about 1.9 billion pounds of sweet potatoes and 21 million pounds of cranberries. But Thanksgiving is no longer the only day we heap food onto our plates. We've created an arsenal of weapons to prevent food from spoiling between field and market: ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Basic food crops dangerously vulnerable

    In the case of wheat, for instance, as a deadly new strain of Black Stem Rust devastates harvests across Africa and Arabia, and threatens the staple food supply of a billion people from Egypt to Pakistan, the areas where potentially crop and life-saving remnant wild wheat relatives grow are only minimally protected. “Our basic food plants have always been vulnerable to attack from new strains of ...

  • Governments Invest $7 Million into Crop Research

    Today Saskatchewan Agriculture Minister Lyle Stewart and Member of Parliament Kelly Block (Saskatoon-Rosetown-Biggar), on behalf of Federal Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz, announced nearly $7 million in funding for 46 crop-related research projects. “Our Government is proud to support crop research projects that benefit Saskatchewan farmers through improved yields and disease ...

  • Hudson Valley organic farm produces seeds largely by hand

    Drying corn stalks wilt in late summer sun as Ken Greene tours his crops. Calendula flowers are past bloom and brown. Melon leaves lay crinkled by the dirt. Plants have, literally, gone to seed. A perfect picture for an organic seed harvest. "It looks like hell now, but it's actually good for the seeds," said Greene, co-founder of the Hudson Valley Seed Library. The small business 70 miles ...


    By Associated Press

  • Kenyan Professor promotes indigenous crops to solve Africa’s food crises

    In Kenya, a devastating cycle of drought and flood reflects the worst that climate change has to offer. These and other more insiduous impacts of warming temperatures threaten the health and survival of the nation's poorest and most at-risk inhabitants, namely women and children. The average yearly income in Kenya is less than US$1,000, 60 percent of the population is below poverty level, and ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Maintaining food crop diversity: an interview with Gary Paul Nabhan

    Guest author Fred Bahnson interviewed Gary Paul Nabhan, a lecturer, food and farming advocate, folklorist, and conservationist who lives and farms in the U.S. Southwest. Nabhan discusses his new book, the future of agriculture, and how 1,400-year-old Lebanese farming techniques influence his land ethic. Tell me about your latest book, Where Our Food Comes From-Retracing Nikolay Vavilov's ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

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