peas growing News

  • Pigeon pea genome sequence could boost yields

    More than a billion people could soon benefit from improved yields of the important drought-resistant crop pigeon pea now that its genome has been sequenced by a global partnership. The sequence, published online in Nature Biotechnology last week (6 November), should cut the time it takes to develop higher-yielding pigeon pea varieties from the 6–10 years required for traditional breeding ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • World Soil Day hails symbiotic role of pulses to boost sustainable agriculture

    Soil and pulses can make major contributions to the challenge of feeding the world's growing population and combating climate change, especially when deployed together, according to Soils and Pulses: Symbiosis for Life, a new report by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization released on  ...

  • Growers can increase efficiency with single crop focus

    Vegetable growers are able to benefit from increased productivity by focusing their growing operations on producing a single commodity, with efficiencies created by investing in labour that is specialised for a single crop. This is one of the outcomes from an Economic Discussion Paper produced by vegetable grower body AUSVEG, using data from the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and ...


    By AUSVEG

  • Growers can increase efficiency with single crop focus

    Vegetable growers are able to benefit from increased productivity by focusing their growing operations on producing a single commodity, with efficiencies created by investing in labour that is specialised for a single crop. This is one of the outcomes from an Economic Discussion Paper produced by vegetable grower body AUSVEG, using data from the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and ...


    By AUSVEG

  • Egyptian Experimental Farm Reveals Possible Market for `Sewage Farming` Agricultural Products

    Crops grown on the Egyptian desert using treated wastewater are safe for human consumption and their production is economically viable, concluded engineers working on an experimental farm in Gerga, in the Sohag Governorate of Egypt. Their final report, 'The Re-use of Treated Sewage Waste Water in Agriculture' contains recommendations for a successful country-wide establishment of ...

  • FAO calls for US$23 million to step-up farming in Haiti

    FAO has called for US$23 million from international donors for agriculture in Haiti as part of the United Nations US$562 million appeal for that country following the devastating earthquake. The money is needed to support to food production in fields and backyards, not just in and around the area hit but in rural areas not directly affected but which will nevertheless feel the aftershocks of the ...

  • Diversifying crops `could green African agriculture`

    The biodiversity of crop fields could be key to a greener revolution in Africa, where ecosystems are degrading and crop yields are stagnating, says a study conducted in Malawi. African farmers could halve their fertiliser use and still get the same yields, the study found, with less year-to-year variation in yields and with as much as 70 per cent more protein in grains — by simply rotating ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Rome-based UN agencies join forces on food losses

    The UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the World Food Programme (WFP) have launched a joint project to tackle the global problem of food losses. Around one-third of all food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted each year, amounting to 1.3 billion tonnes - or enough food to feed 2 billion people. The three UN ...

  • Scientists claim GM cowpea could generate US$1 billion

    A pest-resistant version of the black-eyed pea, a subspecies of the cowpea, is on track for commercial introduction, promising higher yields and claimed savings of up to US$1 billion on a crop that has found new popularity among African smallholders. The cowpea, actually a bean, is rich in protein and is an important crop for both tackling malnutrition and adapting to climate change as it ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Soil nitrogen increased through greater plant biodiversity

    Increased plant biodiversity improves grassland soil quality by boosting its nitrogen levels, even in the absence of nitrogen-fixing plants, recent research has found. Previous research has shown that grasslands with higher biodiversity had higher levels of carbon and nitrogen. However, in the case of nitrogen it has been suggested that this was purely a result of increased numbers of ...

  • Basic food crops dangerously vulnerable

    In the case of wheat, for instance, as a deadly new strain of Black Stem Rust devastates harvests across Africa and Arabia, and threatens the staple food supply of a billion people from Egypt to Pakistan, the areas where potentially crop and life-saving remnant wild wheat relatives grow are only minimally protected. “Our basic food plants have always been vulnerable to attack from new strains of ...

  • Governments Invest $7 Million into Crop Research

    Today Saskatchewan Agriculture Minister Lyle Stewart and Member of Parliament Kelly Block (Saskatoon-Rosetown-Biggar), on behalf of Federal Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz, announced nearly $7 million in funding for 46 crop-related research projects. “Our Government is proud to support crop research projects that benefit Saskatchewan farmers through improved yields and disease ...

  • Bt cowpea could generate up to US$1 billion for small farmers

    A pest-resistant version of the black-eyed pea, a subspecies of the cowpea, is on track for commercial introduction, promising higher yields and claimed savings of up to US$1 billion of a crop that has found new popularity among African smallholders. The cowpea, actually a bean, is rich in protein and is an important crop for both tackling malnutrition and adapting to climate change as it ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Kenyan Professor promotes indigenous crops to solve Africa’s food crises

    In Kenya, a devastating cycle of drought and flood reflects the worst that climate change has to offer. These and other more insiduous impacts of warming temperatures threaten the health and survival of the nation's poorest and most at-risk inhabitants, namely women and children. The average yearly income in Kenya is less than US$1,000, 60 percent of the population is below poverty level, and ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Hudson Valley organic farm produces seeds largely by hand

    Drying corn stalks wilt in late summer sun as Ken Greene tours his crops. Calendula flowers are past bloom and brown. Melon leaves lay crinkled by the dirt. Plants have, literally, gone to seed. A perfect picture for an organic seed harvest. "It looks like hell now, but it's actually good for the seeds," said Greene, co-founder of the Hudson Valley Seed Library. The small business 70 miles ...


    By Associated Press

  • Valtra N113 HiTech aids game management in Finland

    The Korhonen farm in Tervo, Finland, uses a Valtra N113 HiTech to maintain its forests and fields for game management. Nature is everything to this family’s active hunters, who manage their farm with respect for the environment. In this they rely on their Valtra. Antti Korhonen and his son Mikko are active nature lovers and hunters. Their family farm focuses on game management and ...

  • Let`s do more than give thanks for our abundance

    With the amount of food produced in our country, every day could be Thanksgiving. For this November feast we cook more than 45 million turkeys, about 1.9 billion pounds of sweet potatoes and 21 million pounds of cranberries. But Thanksgiving is no longer the only day we heap food onto our plates. We've created an arsenal of weapons to prevent food from spoiling between field and market: ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Maintaining food crop diversity: an interview with Gary Paul Nabhan

    Guest author Fred Bahnson interviewed Gary Paul Nabhan, a lecturer, food and farming advocate, folklorist, and conservationist who lives and farms in the U.S. Southwest. Nabhan discusses his new book, the future of agriculture, and how 1,400-year-old Lebanese farming techniques influence his land ethic. Tell me about your latest book, Where Our Food Comes From-Retracing Nikolay Vavilov's ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

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