photosynthesis yield News

  • Improving wheat yields for global food security

    With the world’s population set to reach 8.9 billion by 2050, CSIRO scientists are hunting down and exploiting a number of wheat’s key genetic traits in a bid to substantially boost its grain yield. The rate of wheat-yield improvement achievable through conventional plant breeding and genetic engineering alone is not fast enough to compete with a rapidly growing global ...

  • New foliar nutrient to improve sugar beet yields

    How it works The early growth stage is crucial to sugar beet yield, as sugar accumulation begins from very early in the growth cycle. Optimising nutrition during this important early phase encourages more even, healthy leaf growth and more productive photosynthesis when the sun shines. With the higher nutrient demand of sugar beet for NPK, Magnesium and essential micronutrients such ...


    By Ilex EnviroSciences Limited

  • Desert bacteria could help boost crop yields

    Desert soil microbes could help halt desertification and boost agriculture in arid regions of the Middle East and North Africa, according to a study.   Scientists from the United Arab Emirates [UAE] have isolated local salt- and drought-tolerant strains of Rhizobia, soil bacteria that fix nitrogen when they become established ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • New Discovery Will Enhance Yield and Quality of Cereal and Bioenergy Crops

    A team of scientists led by Thomas Brutnell, Ph.D., director of the Enterprise Rent-A-Car Institute for Renewable ...

  • Scientists find ozone levels already affecting soybean yields

    Current atmospheric ozone levels are already suppressing soybean yields, according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and university cooperators studying the effect of global climate change on crops. ARS plant physiologists Don Ort and Carl Bernacchi, molecular biologist Lisa Ainsworth and geneticist Randall Nelson have been working with University of Illinois scientists on a ...

  • ARPA-E Provides $300,000 In Third Round Funding For PETROSS Project

    In May of 2016, the DOE's Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) awarded the University of Illinois and the University of Florida $300,000 to continue researching ultra-productive biofuel crops. The research project is called Plants Engineered To Replace Oil in Sugarcane and Sweet Sorghum (PETROSS), and ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Nitrogen use by warm-season grasses for biomass production

    Perennial, warm-season grasses are being evaluated as potential renewable energy crops. These species are well-suited for the production of biomass for energy applications because they utilize C4 photosynthesis and are perennial. Grasses that employ the C4 photosynthetic pathway use water, nitrogen (N), and solar radiation more efficiently than plants having the C3 pathway, and therefore are ...

  • Visit us at LAMMA 17

    Come and see us at LAMMA 17 in Hall 7. We will be launching a new phosphite-based nutrient for sugar beet and revealing the latest PK MAXX+ potato field trial results. You can also claim BASIS CPD knowledge trail points with our crop nutrition quiz. Find us in Hall 7 Stand 7109 We are in a slightly different location this year. Still at the lower end of ...


    By Ilex EnviroSciences Limited

  • Warming climate may devastate major US crops

    Three of the most important crops produced in the United States—corn, soybeans and cotton—are predicted to suffer declines of as much as 80 percent if temperatures continue to rise with manmade climate change, says a new study. In recent years, experts have debated whether human-induced global warming will cause crops to suffer or flourish, depending on the region and the crop. The new study, ...

  • GM crops can thrive as climate warms

    Genetically engineering photosynthesis in plants could take advantage of rising global temperatures and increased levels of carbon dioxide, US scientists say. They believe this could achieve much higher yields on the same amount of land and help to stave off the prospect of widespread hunger as human populations increase. Researchers at ...


    By Climate News Network

  • 10 Things to know about food on World Food Day

    October 16 is World Food Day. It offers the opportunity to strengthen national and international solidarity in the fight to end hunger, malnutrition, and poverty. With falling water tables, eroding soils, and rising temperatures making it difficult to feed growing populations, control of arable land and water resources is moving to center stage in the global struggle for food security. Here ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Creating the Perfect Environmental and Atmospheric Conditions for Vertical Farming

    The global population is rapidly expanding, and new technologies are required to enable us to keep up with rising food demands. Vertical farming provides a secure supply of food year-round while using minimal space, water, and energy. Creating the perfect environment, and especially the perfect CO2atmosphere, in vertical farms is essential for optimizing crop yields and farm economics. ...


    By Edinburgh Sensors Ltd

  • Is Algae the new green?

    Algae, one of the most abundant and easily cultured organisms on the planet, has a versatile range of uses in the environmental sector. From treating wastewater to providing bio-fuels, this simple organism may be the answer to several environmental problems. Algae are a large and diverse group of simple photosynthetic organisms with approximately 65,000 different species around the ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • GMO crops could expect a brighter future

    One of the touchier areas of scientific research – in much of Europe, at least – is the genetic manipulation of food plants, seaweed and algae to try to produce more food or provide better rates of conversion into biofuels. But across the Atlantic genetically-modified crops (GMOs) are increasingly a different story. They are a deeply controversial subject ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Rising temperature, rising food prices

    Agriculture as it exists today developed over 11,000 years of rather remarkable climate stability. It has evolved to maximize production within that climate system. Now, suddenly, the climate is changing. With each passing year, the agricultural system is becoming more out of sync with the climate system. In generations past, when there was an extreme weather event, such as a monsoon failure in ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Algae could solve world`s fuel crisis

    Genetically modified blue and green algae could be the answer to the world's fuel problems. Bioengineers have already developed algae that produce ethanol, oil and even diesel -- and the only things the organisms need are sunlight, CO2 and seawater. Biochemist Dan Robertson's living gas stations have the dark-green shimmer of oak leaves and are as tiny as E. coli bacteria. Their genetic material ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Aurora Algae Introduces the Industry’s First Photosynthetic Algae-Based Platform for Pharmaceutical, Food, Fuel and Aquaculture Products

    Formerly Aurora Biofuels, the Company Enters the Commercialization Phase with an Expanded Product Portfolio ALAMEDA, Calif. -Aurora Algae, formerly Aurora Biofuels, today introduced the industry’s first photosynthetic algae-based platform for the production of sustainable, premium products in the pharmaceutical, nutritional supplement, aquaculture and fuels ...


    By Aurora Algae, Inc.

  • Scientists Create Plants That Produce Their Own Fertilizer

    Plants will be able to produce their own fertilizer in the future meaning farmers will not have to purchase and spread fertilizers for their crops anymore. The resulting increase in food production will also benefit countless numbers of people across the globe, who would otherwie go hungry. While statements like these may sound more like something out of a science fiction novel, a new study ...


    By AZoNetwork UK Ltd.

  • Wheat rust diseases remain a constant but neglected threat

    FAO is calling for countries in the global ‘wheat belt’ to step up monitoring and prevention for wheat rusts – fungal diseases that do especially well in particularly wet seasons. Yields could be affected across North Africa, the Middle East into West and South Asia, which account for more than 30 percent of global wheat output and nearly 40 percent of total land area dedicated ...

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