photosynthesis yield News

  • Team Models Photosynthesis and Finds Room for Improvement

    Teaching crop plants to concentrate carbon dioxide in their leaves could increase photosynthetic efficiency by 60 percent and yields by as much as 40 percent, researchers report in a new study.The team used a computer model to simulate how adding genes from a type of photosynthetic algae known as cyanobacteria might influence photosynthetic efficiency in plants. Cyanobacteria contain small ...


  • New foliar nutrient to improve sugar beet yields

    How it works The early growth stage is crucial to sugar beet yield, as sugar accumulation begins from very early in the growth cycle. Optimising nutrition during this important early phase encourages more even, healthy leaf growth and more productive photosynthesis when the sun shines. With the higher nutrient demand of sugar beet for NPK, Magnesium and essential micronutrients such ...


    By Ilex EnviroSciences Limited

  • Desert bacteria could help boost crop yields

    Desert soil microbes could help halt desertification and boost agriculture in arid regions of the Middle East and North Africa, according to a study.   Scientists from the United Arab Emirates [UAE] have isolated local salt- and drought-tolerant strains of Rhizobia, soil bacteria that fix nitrogen when they become established ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Improving wheat yields for global food security

    With the world’s population set to reach 8.9 billion by 2050, CSIRO scientists are hunting down and exploiting a number of wheat’s key genetic traits in a bid to substantially boost its grain yield. The rate of wheat-yield improvement achievable through conventional plant breeding and genetic engineering alone is not fast enough to compete with a rapidly growing global ...

  • New Discovery Will Enhance Yield and Quality of Cereal and Bioenergy Crops

    A team of scientists led by Thomas Brutnell, Ph.D., director of the Enterprise Rent-A-Car Institute for Renewable ...

  • Scientists find ozone levels already affecting soybean yields

    Current atmospheric ozone levels are already suppressing soybean yields, according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and university cooperators studying the effect of global climate change on crops. ARS plant physiologists Don Ort and Carl Bernacchi, molecular biologist Lisa Ainsworth and geneticist Randall Nelson have been working with University of Illinois scientists on a ...

  • ARPA-E Provides $300,000 In Third Round Funding For PETROSS Project

    In May of 2016, the DOE's Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) awarded the University of Illinois and the University of Florida $300,000 to continue researching ultra-productive biofuel crops. The research project is called Plants Engineered To Replace Oil in Sugarcane and Sweet Sorghum (PETROSS), and ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • TruLite LED Releases Updated Spectral Output For Their LED Plant Grow Lights

    TruLite LED has officially released their latest update and adjustment to spectral output for their LED plant grow lights. Through continuous research and development of their solid state chip configuration, yields just keep getting better. The use of specific colors in very precise wavelengths in their grow lights is important as research continues. These tweaks are done ...


    By TruLite Industries

  • Nitrogen use by warm-season grasses for biomass production

    Perennial, warm-season grasses are being evaluated as potential renewable energy crops. These species are well-suited for the production of biomass for energy applications because they utilize C4 photosynthesis and are perennial. Grasses that employ the C4 photosynthetic pathway use water, nitrogen (N), and solar radiation more efficiently than plants having the C3 pathway, and therefore are ...

  • GM crops can thrive as climate warms

    Genetically engineering photosynthesis in plants could take advantage of rising global temperatures and increased levels of carbon dioxide, US scientists say. They believe this could achieve much higher yields on the same amount of land and help to stave off the prospect of widespread hunger as human populations increase. Researchers at ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Visit us at LAMMA 17

    Come and see us at LAMMA 17 in Hall 7. We will be launching a new phosphite-based nutrient for sugar beet and revealing the latest PK MAXX+ potato field trial results. You can also claim BASIS CPD knowledge trail points with our crop nutrition quiz. Find us in Hall 7 Stand 7109 We are in a slightly different location this year. Still at the lower end of ...


    By Ilex EnviroSciences Limited

  • Warming climate may devastate major US crops

    Three of the most important crops produced in the United States—corn, soybeans and cotton—are predicted to suffer declines of as much as 80 percent if temperatures continue to rise with manmade climate change, says a new study. In recent years, experts have debated whether human-induced global warming will cause crops to suffer or flourish, depending on the region and the crop. The new study, ...

  • The risks of oxygen depletion and enrichment in aquaculture

    Oxygen depletion is a concern on both dry land and in aquatic environments. Dissolved oxygen is present in water and comes from the atmosphere and also photosynthesis by aquatic plants. Dissolved oxygen is necessary to many forms of life including fish, invertebrates, bacteria and plants. Fish and crustaceans obtain oxygen for respiration through their gills, while plant life and phytoplankton ...


    By Analox Sensor Technology

  • 10 Things to know about food on World Food Day

    October 16 is World Food Day. It offers the opportunity to strengthen national and international solidarity in the fight to end hunger, malnutrition, and poverty. With falling water tables, eroding soils, and rising temperatures making it difficult to feed growing populations, control of arable land and water resources is moving to center stage in the global struggle for food security. Here ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Flue Gas-Cultivated Microalgae Made into Biofuels, Health Food, and Skin Care Products

    Researchers at National Cheng Kung University (NCKU), southern Tainan, have used flue gas from factory chimneys to cultivate microalgae which can be made into a wide range of biofuels, health food and skin care products. A team, led by Distinguished Professor Jo-Shu Chang at NCKU Department of Chemical Engineering, has collaborated with China Steel Company to ...

  • Year of the English Garden – How is gas used in horticulture?

    The Queen may be celebrating her 90th birthday, but there’s also another notable anniversary in 2016 which celebrates England’s heritage. This year marks the 300th anniversary of the birth of England’s greatest gardener, Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown. ‘Capability’ Brown is best known for designing gardens and landscapes at some of the country’s ...


    By Analox Sensor Technology

  • OriginOil Announces Breakthrough Hydrogen Harvester Invention

    New Technology Taps Hydrogen Generated by Living Algae LOS ANGELES - OriginOil, Inc. (OOIL), the developer of a breakthrough technology to transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum, today announced a new invention that generates hydrogen from living algae, providing an additional energy source from bioreactors. In contrast to previously ...


    By OriginClear Inc.

  • Purfresh Expands Solar Crop Protectant Product Line with Purshade Ultra

    Purfresh, a leading provider of clean technologies that purify, protect, and preserve the global food supply chain, today introduced Purshade® Ultra, a next-generation solar stress protectant scientifically engineered to provide advanced ultraviolet (UV) protection for crops. Purshade Ultra, formulated with premium materials and advanced chemistry, is the latest member of the Purshade family of ...


  • Is Algae the new green?

    Algae, one of the most abundant and easily cultured organisms on the planet, has a versatile range of uses in the environmental sector. From treating wastewater to providing bio-fuels, this simple organism may be the answer to several environmental problems. Algae are a large and diverse group of simple photosynthetic organisms with approximately 65,000 different species around the ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you