pig fertility News

  • UF/IFAS researchers use pigs to root out problem weeds

    Sometimes, the old-fashioned ways are the best ways. Back before chemical pesticides and herbicides, farmers had to come up with ways to kill the weeds that took over their fields. One method used “back in the day” was letting pigs loose in fields that were not being used for crops for a season and allowing the pigs to do what they do naturally: dig up the roots of weeds and ...

  • Record breaking rapeseed crop last month – liquid fertiliser tanks bring savings

    Last month a Northallerton farmer harvested what could well be the highest yield of rapeseed ever recorded. With 7.2t/ha, the crop way outweighs the UK national average of 4t/ha. The restored hybrid variety, Incentive, grew well for a number of reasons attributed by farmer, Steve Tuer. To begin with, the farm used to be a dairy farm, so there is thought to be a lot of inherent fertility in the ...


    By ENDURAMAXX

  • New Material to Enhance Soils using Manure Waste

    The results of the research group of Valuation of resources from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid suggest an optimal solution to manage the manure from chicken and cattle. Biochar, a material obtained after thermal treatment of this waste through pyrolysis, is an organic fertilizer that applied in ...

  • Farm Incomes Fall – Bad Weather and High Costs Blamed – Rainwater Tanks A Bonus

    According to Western Morning News, farm incomes have fallen and a combination of bad weather and high costs are blamed. The report refers to figures from the latest farm income statistics released last week that cover the last twelve months to February 2014. According to the figures, farm business income is falling on cereals, general cropping, and mixed and grazing livestock farms. However, ...


    By ENDURAMAXX

  • Fossil fuels and meat consumption pollute coasts

    Eutrophication: Sources and Drivers of Nutrient Pollution, the second report of a three-part series, finds that developing countries will see more nitrogen and phosphorus pollution in coastal and freshwater areas in the coming decades as a result of population and economic growth. More people and rising incomes will increase the demand for food, energy, land and other natural resources, which ...

  • Rising Animal Health – Sinking Costs: Sustained feeding with “FermCube“

    WEDA Dammann & Westerkamp relies on the advantages of fermented feed in pig managements. With their unique, self-sufficient modular system “FermCube”, the Lower Saxonian manufacturers of house equipment offer with immediate effect a compact fermentation unit as a container solution – including complete process control and process monitoring, as well as mixing technology and ...

  • EU and FAO partner to help flood-affected Serbian farms rebuild

    The European Union (EU) will partner with FAO to help small-scale farmers in Serbia recover from the devastating floods of the past spring. An EU grant of EUR 8 million, aimed at restoring the livelihoods of the most vulnerable farming families, was announced at a ceremony here today. Agriculture is the backbone of the rural economy in Serbia and an important source of income for the majority of ...

  • Beef pollutes more than pork, poultry, study says

    Raising beef for the American dinner table does far more damage to the environment than producing pork, poultry, eggs or dairy, a new study says. Compared with the other animal proteins, beef produces five times more heat-trapping gases per calorie, puts out six times as much water-polluting nitrogen, takes 11 times more water for irrigation and uses 28 times the land, according to the study ...


    By Associated Press

  • Balancing food security and environmental quality in China

    In many ways, the evolution of Chinese agriculture over the past 40 years is a remarkable success story. Spurred by investments in research and government subsidies for fertilizers and other farm technologies, China now feeds 22% of the world’s population on just 9% of its total arable land. But as a special collection of papers in the July-August issue of the Journal of Environmental ...

  • Appeals Court sends `Dead Zone` Lawsuit Back to Judge

    A federal judge who ordered the Environmental Protection Agency to take action to regulate farm runoff and other pollution blamed for the Gulf of Mexico's annual oxygen-depleted "dead zone" must take a second crack at his ruling. An appeals court has ordered U.S. District Judge Jay Zainey to reassess his 2013 order telling the EPA to set federal limits on the nutrients nitrogen and phosphorous, ...


    By Associated Press

  • Six months after disaster, Philippine farmers bring in the harvest

    Tens of thousands of farmers are bringing in their first rice harvest just six months after one of the worst typhoons to ever hit the Philippines left their fields in tatters and their livelihoods at risk, FAO announced today. After Typhoon Haiyan hit the central Philippines on 8 November, 2013, the situation was dire. More than 6,000 people lost their lives, while some 600,000 hectares of ...

  • Antibiotic-eating bug unearthed in soil

    It’s well known how bacteria exposed to antibiotics for long periods will find ways to resist the drugs—by quickly pumping them out of their cells, for instance, or modifying the compounds so they’re no longer toxic. Now new research has uncovered another possible mechanism of antibiotic “resistance” in soil. In a paper publishing this week in the Journal of ...

  • Overfishing Threatens Critical Link in the Food Chain

    The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. Collectively known as forage fish, these species—including sardines, anchovies, herrings, and shrimp-like crustaceans called krill—feed on plankton and become food themselves for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Historically, people have eaten ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Senegal nears first victory in war on tsetse fly

    A campaign against the tsetse fly, a pest that transmits a disease that devastates livestock, in the Niayes area near the capital Dakar has radically reduced the fly population and is paving the way for complete eradication. "Since the project started, there is already less disease. It has not only reduced the tsetse but also ticks, which cause lots of other diseases in the area. We have noticed ...

  • EPA finds greenhouse gases (GHGs) harmful

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) makes emissions reporting mandatory A major cause of climate change is the harm that is done to the Earth by man-made chemicals. Whilst chemicals, such as those used to produce day by day items, operate equipment and generally make life easier, are necessary, they present a threat to the environment. EPA Place Limits on GHGsGovernments around the world ...


    By Verisae

  • NRDC and Berkeley Food Institute Announce Winners of the 2014 Growing Green Awards

    Today, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and the Berkeley Food Institute (BFI) celebrate four remarkable leaders who are advancing sustainable food and agriculture at the sixth annual Growing Green Awards. Chosen from hundreds of nominations submitted across the country by a renowned panel of judges, the 2014 ...

  • How green was my vertical farm?

    By 2050, 80% of the earth’s population will live in cities and 3 billion more people will need to be fed. The simple fact is we are running out of available land to grow enough food to feed them. If we can’t grow our cities outward to find more arable land, the only solution is to grow them upwards. This may change the way we design cities forever. The problem is real and ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

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