plant genes News

  • Scientists find four-leaf clover gene

    Ending a period of “bad luck” for clover researchers, scientists report finding the gene that turns ordinary three-leaf clovers into the coveted four-leaf types. Masked by the three-leaf gene and strongly influenced by environmental condition, molecular markers now make it possible to detect the presence of the gene for four-leaves and for breeders to work with it. The results of the ...

  • GM cotton genes found in wild species

    Genetically modified (GM) cotton genes have been found in wild populations for the first time, making it the third plant species — after Brassica and bentgrass  — in which transgenes have established in the wild. The discovery was made in Mexico by six Mexican researchers investigating the flow of genes to wild cotton populations of the species Gossypium hirsutum. They found ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • South Pacific coconut gene bank under threat

    The international collection of the South Pacific's coconut palm species, held at a field gene bank in Papua New Guinea (PNG), is under threat from a disease outbreak close to the gene bank. The warning came at a meeting on the Pacific coconut research and development (R&D) strategy in Samoa last week (1 October–2 November), convened by the Australian Centre for International ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • `Waterproofing` gene may also protect rice from droughts

    Farmers facing extreme weather conditions associated with climate change could benefit from the finding that a gene that 'waterproofs' rice plants also appears to protect them from drought. The Sub1a gene, which naturally occurs in some low-yielding varieties in India, was discovered in the 1990s at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), in the Philippines. Subsequent research showed ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Resistance genes from wild relatives of crops offer opportunities for more sustainable agriculture worldwidew

    Growing crops with stacks of two or more resistance genes from closely related species, introduced into the crop via for instance genetic engineering, combined with the simultaneous introduction of resistance management, can ensure the long-term resistance of these plants to economically significant and aggressive diseases. The combination offers opportunities to make agriculture more sustainable ...

  • Plant strategies for optimising nitrate intake

    The less nitrogen there is in the soil, the better plants are at using it. Researchers from INRA, CNRS and CIRAD, in cooperation with Czech colleagues, have recently shed light on the crucial role of a protein that enables plants to not only assess their environment but also activate the proper adaptive response based on the conditions. This research, published in the 2 March 2015 issue of Nature ...

  • Major breakthrough on how viruses infect plants

    CSIRO plant scientists have shed light on a problem that has puzzled researchers since the first virus was discovered in 1892 – how exactly do they cause disease? In a major breakthrough that helps us better understand how viruses cause diseases in plants – and potentially in animals and humans – Dr Ming-Bo Wang and Neil Smith of CSIRO Plant Industry have revealed a ...

  • ARS plant collections help safeguard crops

    In the months ahead, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists plan to collect walnuts from Kyrgyzstan, grasses from Russia, and carrots and sunflowers from fields across the Southeastern United States in efforts that will enhance one of the nation's most effective tools for protecting the food supply. Researchers will make the trips to collect plants with useful ...

  • Plants host pathogenic bacteria from livestock farming

    Disease-causing bacteria resulting from livestock farming can contaminate food products and find their way to humans. This occurs remarkably effectively via plants, which explains why recent outbreaks due to infection with EHEC and other E. coli and Salmonella strains are regularly attributed to the consumption of fresh vegetables. These are the findings of researchers from Wageningen UR ...

  • Scientific publication in Plant Physiology including WIWAM xy

    Although the response of plants exposed to severe drought stress has been studied extensively, little is known about how plants adapt their growth under mild drought stress conditions. Here, we analyzed the leaf and rosette growth response of six Arabidopsis thaliana accessions originating from different geographic regions, when exposed to mild drought stress. The automated phenotyping platform ...


    By SMO bvba - WIWAM

  • UF/IFAS scientists to conduct experiment on plants in space

    Two University of Florida scientists will go to Kennedy Space Center March 16 for the launch of the SpaceX-3 Dragon capsule to the International Space Station, to send up and then monitor an experiment designed to help them understand biological functions in space. These experiments are important queries into the concepts of where life can exist in the universe and what it takes to survive in ...

  • Florendovirus: new genus of virus in plant genomes

    While the extent and importance of endogenous viral elements have been thoroughly researched in animals, there is a dearth of knowledge when it comes to plants. Within the framework of a broader international effort, researchers at INRA Versailles-Grignon and Cirad have described a new genus of the Caulimoviridae family of viruses, called Florendovirus, whose members have colonised the genomes of ...

  • Some but not all plants can defend themselves against disease on saline soil

    Some plants with resistance against a specific disease are also able to defend themselves effectively when they are stressed due to, for example, drought or saline soil. At the same time, the resistance of other plants no longer functions in these very same conditions. Although this had been assumed for some time, Wageningen scientist Christos Kissoudis is the first person to show why. As a ...

  • Researchers discover how to make green plastics from plants

    Australian researchers are a step closer to turning plants into ‘biofactories’ capable of producing oils which can be used to replace petrochemicals used to manufacture a range of products. Scientists working within the joint CSIRO/Grains Research and Development Corporation Crop Biofactories Initiative (CBI) have achieved a major advance by accumulating 30 per cent of an unusual fatty acid (UFA) ...

  • The J.R. Simplot Company Announces Innate™ All-Native Plant Technology

    The J. R. Simplot Company's Plant Sciences business announces Innate™ Technology, the all-native biotechnology platform for improving crops, leading to new, better and healthier foods. Innate™ Technology is a patented plant biotechnology process that works with a plant's own genes to ...


    By J.R. Simplot Company

  • As seas rise, saltwater plants offer hope farms will survive

    On a sun-scorched wasteland near India's southern tip, an unlikely garden filled with spiky shrubs and spindly greens is growing, seemingly against all odds. The plants are living on saltwater, coping with drought and possibly offering viable farming alternatives for a future in which rising seas have inundated countless coastal farmlands. Sea rise, one of the consequences of climate change, now ...


    By Associated Press

  • Arcadia Biosciences and African Agricultural Technology Foundation collaborate on test planting of nitrogen use efficient rice

    Arcadia Biosciences, Inc., an agricultural technology company focused on developing technologies and products that benefit the environment and human health, and the African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF) today announced the planting of the first field trial of Nitrogen Use Efficient (NUE) rice in Africa. The NUE rice field trial is the result of more than five years of collaboration ...


    By Arcadia Biosciences, Inc.

  • USD 10-million facility for studying climate change effects on plant growth opens at IRRI

    On a hot, breezy afternoon on 21 January 2016, an international gathering of agricultural scientists and development officials dedicated the Lloyd T. Evans Plant Growth Facility (PGF) on the campus of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI). The opening of the USD 10 million state-of-the-art facility manifests IRRI’s commitment to better understand the effects of climate change on ...

  • Saving wheat crops worldwide

    In a paper published in the prestigious journal Science, scientists from CSIRO Plant Industry, the University of Zurich and the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center have identified a wheat gene sequence which provides protection against leaf rust, stripe rust and powdery mildew. “Genetic disease resistance is highly desirable in plants as it is more environmentally friendly and ...

  • Genetic change could make crops thrive on salty soils

    Scientists have genetically modified plants to tolerate high levels of salt — offering a potential solution to growing food in salty soils. The researchers inserted a gene to remove salt — in the form of sodium ions — from water taken up by the plant before it reaches the leaves, where it does most damage. The research was published in The Plant Cell this month (7 July). High salinity reduces ...


    By SciDev.Net

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