plant genes News

  • GM cotton genes found in wild species

    Genetically modified (GM) cotton genes have been found in wild populations for the first time, making it the third plant species — after Brassica and bentgrass  — in which transgenes have established in the wild. The discovery was made in Mexico by six Mexican researchers investigating the flow of genes to wild cotton populations of the species Gossypium hirsutum. They found ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Scientists find four-leaf clover gene

    Ending a period of “bad luck” for clover researchers, scientists report finding the gene that turns ordinary three-leaf clovers into the coveted four-leaf types. Masked by the three-leaf gene and strongly influenced by environmental condition, molecular markers now make it possible to detect the presence of the gene for four-leaves and for breeders to work with it. The results of the ...

  • Major breakthrough on how viruses infect plants

    CSIRO plant scientists have shed light on a problem that has puzzled researchers since the first virus was discovered in 1892 – how exactly do they cause disease? In a major breakthrough that helps us better understand how viruses cause diseases in plants – and potentially in animals and humans – Dr Ming-Bo Wang and Neil Smith of CSIRO Plant Industry have revealed a ...

  • South Pacific coconut gene bank under threat

    The international collection of the South Pacific's coconut palm species, held at a field gene bank in Papua New Guinea (PNG), is under threat from a disease outbreak close to the gene bank. The warning came at a meeting on the Pacific coconut research and development (R&D) strategy in Samoa last week (1 October–2 November), convened by the Australian Centre for International ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Plant strategies for optimising nitrate intake

    The less nitrogen there is in the soil, the better plants are at using it. Researchers from INRA, CNRS and CIRAD, in cooperation with Czech colleagues, have recently shed light on the crucial role of a protein that enables plants to not only assess their environment but also activate the proper adaptive response based on the conditions. This research, published in the 2 March 2015 issue of Nature ...

  • ARS plant collections help safeguard crops

    In the months ahead, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists plan to collect walnuts from Kyrgyzstan, grasses from Russia, and carrots and sunflowers from fields across the Southeastern United States in efforts that will enhance one of the nation's most effective tools for protecting the food supply. Researchers will make the trips to collect plants with useful ...

  • Plants host pathogenic bacteria from livestock farming

    Disease-causing bacteria resulting from livestock farming can contaminate food products and find their way to humans. This occurs remarkably effectively via plants, which explains why recent outbreaks due to infection with EHEC and other E. coli and Salmonella strains are regularly attributed to the consumption of fresh vegetables. These are the findings of researchers from Wageningen UR ...

  • Scientists Create Plants That Produce Their Own Fertilizer

    Plants will be able to produce their own fertilizer in the future meaning farmers will not have to purchase and spread fertilizers for their crops anymore. The resulting increase in food production will also benefit countless numbers of people across the globe, who would otherwie go hungry. While statements like these may sound more like something out of a science fiction novel, a new study ...


    By AZoNetwork UK Ltd.

  • Scientific publication in Plant Physiology including WIWAM xy

    Although the response of plants exposed to severe drought stress has been studied extensively, little is known about how plants adapt their growth under mild drought stress conditions. Here, we analyzed the leaf and rosette growth response of six Arabidopsis thaliana accessions originating from different geographic regions, when exposed to mild drought stress. The automated phenotyping platform ...


    By SMO bvba - WIWAM

  • Getting to the root of plants

    A diverse team of researchers from Europe, Asia and the USA have unearthed new information on how roots grow and develop. Specifically, how roots are able to move out sideways out of the central root and into the soil. Their discovery has opened the way to further research that may eventually lead to the creation of new crops with improved root structure, improving their chances of survival in ...

  • Resistance genes from wild relatives of crops offer opportunities for more sustainable agriculture worldwidew

    Growing crops with stacks of two or more resistance genes from closely related species, introduced into the crop via for instance genetic engineering, combined with the simultaneous introduction of resistance management, can ensure the long-term resistance of these plants to economically significant and aggressive diseases. The combination offers opportunities to make agriculture more sustainable ...

  • Some but not all plants can defend themselves against disease on saline soil

    Some plants with resistance against a specific disease are also able to defend themselves effectively when they are stressed due to, for example, drought or saline soil. At the same time, the resistance of other plants no longer functions in these very same conditions. Although this had been assumed for some time, Wageningen scientist Christos Kissoudis is the first person to show why. As a ...

  • Saving wheat crops worldwide

    In a paper published in the prestigious journal Science, scientists from CSIRO Plant Industry, the University of Zurich and the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center have identified a wheat gene sequence which provides protection against leaf rust, stripe rust and powdery mildew. “Genetic disease resistance is highly desirable in plants as it is more environmentally friendly and ...

  • Creating Better Soybeans

    In rows of petri dishes, soybean roots bathe in fluorescent light, an unremarkable site unless you work in the laboratory where they grow. The simplicity of the setup belies the complexity of the research that went into creating the roots. For decades, the genes of the seeds that produced these roots have been tinkered with to create a plant that resists a common and highly destructive soybean ...


    By Ohio State University

  • A step forward to making crops tolerant to severe drought

    An international consortium of researchers led by Wageningen University & Research in the Netherlands, has sequenced the genome of the ‘resurrection plant’ Xerophyta viscosa. Today the team publishes the DNA sequence in Nature Plants. In their paper, the team reveals a genetic ‘footprint’ of the amazing ability of this plant to tolerate severe drought for long periods ...

  • Researchers discover how to make green plastics from plants

    Australian researchers are a step closer to turning plants into ‘biofactories’ capable of producing oils which can be used to replace petrochemicals used to manufacture a range of products. Scientists working within the joint CSIRO/Grains Research and Development Corporation Crop Biofactories Initiative (CBI) have achieved a major advance by accumulating 30 per cent of an unusual fatty acid (UFA) ...

  • Genetic change could make crops thrive on salty soils

    Scientists have genetically modified plants to tolerate high levels of salt — offering a potential solution to growing food in salty soils. The researchers inserted a gene to remove salt — in the form of sodium ions — from water taken up by the plant before it reaches the leaves, where it does most damage. The research was published in The Plant Cell this month (7 July). High salinity reduces ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Florendovirus: new genus of virus in plant genomes

    While the extent and importance of endogenous viral elements have been thoroughly researched in animals, there is a dearth of knowledge when it comes to plants. Within the framework of a broader international effort, researchers at INRA Versailles-Grignon and Cirad have described a new genus of the Caulimoviridae family of viruses, called Florendovirus, whose members have colonised the genomes of ...

  • Oilseed rape genome sequenced

    An International consortium of more than 30 research institutes, coordinated by scientists at INRA and CEA-Genoscope and associating CNRS and University of Evry, just succeeded in deciphering the complex genome of the recent oilseed rape1 (Brassica napus L, also known as rapeseed, rape or canola), the most important oilseed crop in Europe, Canada, and Australia. This scientific breakthrough paves ...

  • Sloppy seed-sorting main culprit in GM crop escapes

    Careless handling of seeds may be the key reason for the unintended spread of genetically modified (GM) crops, a study has found. The discovery challenges the widespread belief that the main source of GM contamination is the transfer of pollen by bees from GM crops to non-GM counterparts in neighbouring fields. Human error during seed production and handling is the more likely culprit, say the ...


    By SciDev.Net

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