plant material investigation News

  • Reinforcement of soil by plant roots

    Landslides have devastating impacts across the globe resulting in the loss of life and the destruction of billions of dollars in infrastructure. Soil erosion from wind and water threatens food production, pollutes the environment, and can make living in major cities such as Beijing almost unbearable during dust storms. Just like the great dust bowl of the 1930s, many instances of soil erosion and ...

  • Ahlstrom`s louveira plant in Brazil hit by thunderstorm flooding

    Ahlstrom's Louveira plant in Brazil was hit by a thunderstorm and flooded. Production at the site has been stopped. There were no injuries to Ahlstrom staff or other people at the site. The Louveira plant is located approximately 100 kilometers from Sao Paolo in southeastern Brazil and is part of Ahlstrom's Filtration Business Area. It produces transportation filtration material. Ahlstrom is ...


    By Ahlstrom-Munksjö

  • Composts that contain biodegradable plastics may hinder plant growth

    Composts containing biodegradable plastics may hinder rather than help plant growth, according to a recent study by university scientists in Poland. These findings have implications for waste management practices within the EU. It is important to assess the quality and potential environmental risks associated with composts prepared from different wastes. Biodegradable plastics - known as ...

  • USDA and DOE partnership seeks to develop better plants for bioenergy

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced research awards under a joint DOE-USDA program aimed at improving and accelerating genetic breeding programs to create plants better suited for bioenergy production. The US$8.9 million investment is part of the Obama Administration's broader effort to diversify the nation's energy portfolio and to accelerate the ...


    By US Department of Energy

  • DuPont and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Extend Collaboration in Cutting-Edge Plant Biology Research for Another Five Years

    DuPont andCold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) today announced the renewal for another five years of a research collaboration that began in 2007. This multi-million dollar collaboration supports cutting-edge plant biology research focused on meeting growing food demands worldwide. With the world’s population expected to grow by more than 2 billion by 2050, this collaboration will ...


  • Forests for fuel: European stakeholders discuss the way forward

    As part of the European Union's drive to promote the use of renewable energy, a 'Biomass Action Plan' has been developed which is designed to increase the amount of energy derived from biomass. New research has investigated barriers to greater exploitation of forests as a source of biomass for energy production. Biomass (biological material such as plants) could help mitigate the effects of ...

  • EPA issues stop sale order to dupont on sale and distribution of imprelis herbicide

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today issued an order to E.I. DuPont de Nemours (DuPont) directing the company to immediately halt the sale, use or distribution of Imprelis, an herbicide marketed to control weeds that has been reported to be harming a large number of trees, including Norway spruce and white pine. The order, issued under the Federal Insecticide, ...

  • Kick-off Eco-Innovation project WAVALUE

    In July 2012, the WAVALUE project is launched aiming at the investigation of innovative digestate treatment technologies. This European project is supported by the Eco-Innovation program. Colsen collaborates with Spanish partners: EKONEK, NEIKER and BLUE AGRO. The research activities focus on processing of digestate with ‘spouted bed' techniques aiming at production of tailor-made N-P-K ...


    By Colsen International b.v.

  • Pig feed contamination suspected during recycling process

    Recycled food products are at the centre of investigations into the source of dioxin contamination which has affected Irish pork. Pork products have been pulled off supermarket shelves as the Food Standards Authority (FSA) warned against eating pork from the Irish Republic. However, the FSA stressed consumers are unlikely to be at any 'significant risk'. Concerns were raised when a sample of pig ...

  • Kakadu still battling South American invader

    In a paper recently published in Nature, an international group of scientists led by CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences’ Dr Shon Schooler explained how this unpredictability could lead to a strategy for ongoing control of the weed. A native of South America, the aquatic plant Salvinia molesta is one of the most widespread and environmentally and economically destructive invasive plants because it can ...

  • International crop breeding programme needed for African farming

    Climate change poses a large threat to African agriculture, but there is little research on how to respond. A recent study indicates that traditional adaptation methods are not enough and international collaboration is needed in 'planned adaptation' by collecting and conserving certain crops for the future. A large proportion of the African population - mainly the poor - depend on agriculture for ...

  • Researchers study how soil breathes to understand carbon-cycling

    Soil respiration (SR) plays a major role in moving carbon from the ecosystem to the atmosphere. Converting land for agricultural use accelerates CO2 emissions via SR. Planting trees (afforestation) has been heralded as a potential climate change mitigation approach. However, new research suggests that the effects of agricultural practices on peatland remain for decades and can continue to ...

  • Soil carbon cycling and the global carbon balance

    Like most things that exist underground, plant roots are out-of-sight and easily forgotten, but while flowers, leaves, and other aboveground plant parts are more familiar, plant roots are equally deserving of our appreciation. Beneath every towering tree, tasty crop, and dazzling ornamental lies a root system that makes it all possible. Roots provide anchor and support for plants, extract water ...

  • Shifts in Mediterranean fish farming increase pressure on wild fish stocks

    Fish farming in the Mediterranean has increasingly shifted from producing fish such as grey mullet, which are herbivores near the bottom of the food chain, to species such as sea bass, which are predators. This ‘farming up’ the food chain requires wild fish to be caught to provide feed. A return to farming fish lower in the food chain would use marine resources more efficiently, a new ...

  • Choice of winter cover crop mixture steers summer crop yield

    Scientists from Wageningen University & Research demonstrate that the productivity of a next main crop can be manipulated through the choice of species in a preceding winter cover crop mixture. They report their latest findings in the Journal of Applied Ecology of 2nd of June. With their publication, the scientist agree with recommendations of FAO to included cover crops in rotations, on top ...

  • Vermicompost leachate improves tomato seedling growth

    Worldwide, drought conditions, extreme temperatures, and high soil saline content all have negative effects on tomato crops. These natural processes reduce soil nutrient content and lifespan, result in reduced plant growth and yield, and ultimately translate to lower profits for tomato producers. As an alternative to unsustainable practices such as the use of synthetic fertilizers, producers are ...

  • Wild food is an important ecosystem service, study argues

    Wild plants and animals consumed as food provide an important ecosystem service that deserves more policy attention, claims a recent study. To support their argument, the researchers gathered data which show the significance of wild food to European traditions, cultural identity and recreation. Many countries around the world are creating maps of their ecosystem services to support environmental ...

  • FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company Completes Root Cause Report on Davis-Besse Shield Building Cracking

     FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company (FENOC) announced today that it has completed its Root Cause Analysis Report regarding the cause of the tight cracks identified in portions of the Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station Shield Building during its fall 2011 reactor head replacement outage. The report has been submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This extensive evaluation ...


    By FirstEnergy

  • Cultivation affects pesticide–soil interactions

    Pesticides are often used to enhance crop production by killing unwanted animals or plants. Unfortunately, they can also negatively impact humans and environmental health. The degree of impact, in part, depends on the fate and behavior of pesticides in the environment. The latter is governed by complex interactions of pesticides with soil components. One such important interaction is sorption of ...

  • Aflatoxin Food Safety Scandal in China Widens to Include Oil

    The Chinese government has recalled cooking oil products that were made by three separate companies after discovering high levels of aflatoxin, according to AFP. This latest food safety scandal has raised public outcry, as it closely follows the news that milk from the country’s leading dairy firm, Mengniu, was tainted with aflatoxin as well.   Aflatoxin is a potentially lethal ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

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