plant nutrient level monitoring News

  • Nutrient levels on the decline in many Estonian rivers

    A new study has analysed the impact of industrial and agricultural changes on nutrients in Estonian rivers. The results indicated that there were significant reductions in nitrogen in one third of the sites, significant reductions in phosphorus in a quarter of sites and significant reductions in both nutrients in nearly a tenth of sites. High levels of nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, ...

  • States Develop New Strategies to Reduce Nutrient Levels in Mississippi River, Gulf of Mexico

    Summary The 12 states of the Hypoxia Task Force have devised new strategies to speed up reduction of nutrient levels in waterways in the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River Basin. High nutrients levels are a key contributor each summer to the large area of low oxygen in the Gulf of Mexico known as a dead zone. Each state has outlined specific actions it will take to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus ...

  • Soil biodiversity reduces nitrogen pollution and improves crops’ nutrient uptake

    Increased soil biodiversity can reduce nitrogen pollution, improve nutrient uptake by plants and even increase crop yields, new research suggests. The two-year study found that levels of nitrogen leaching from soil with an abundant soil life were nearly 25% lower than for soil with a reduced level of soil life. Practices which enhance soil biodiversity such as reduced tilling, crop rotation and ...

  • Health of European streams revealed by leaf breakdown

    A recent study, which assessed 100 streams across Europe, reveals that a key ecosystem process, leaf litter breakdown, is slowed when nutrient concentrations in the water are either very low or very high, has the highest potential at moderate nutrient concentrations and is inhibited in heavily polluted waters, implying that the relationship between nutrient levels and ...

  • Ultra-fine coatings on sediment grains influence nitrate and sulfate storage in soil

    Tiny sediment grains are covered with a very fine-grained, complex mixture of minerals in an open fabric that results in a large surface area in contact with water between the grains. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are studying this microscopic layer and finding that the mineral composition of these coatings on sediment grains in the unsaturated zone (i.e., between land surface ...

  • High-tech greenhouse research facility for Australian horticulture

    Supported by Wageningen UR Greenhouse horticulture, a new high-tech greenhouse research facility will be built on the campus of University of Western Sydney, 50 km West of Sydney, Australia. Greenhouse horticultural industry is fast developing in Australia. Several new large vegetable production sites have started their operation during the last years, some of them with Dutch technology. ...

  • Increasing potato production

    Despite sophisticated nutrient management of potato crops, quality and yield still see wide variability. Although nutrients are already well understood, the influence of other environmental factors remains understudied. A research team from Michigan State University conducted a study to determine how the chemical and physical properties of soil, along with the light waves the plant absorbs and ...

  • Getting to the bottom of Africa`s carbon figures

    In the Republic of the Congo, and most of Central Africa, the carbon cycle has until now remained an under-researched topic. It is not at all clear how much CO2 or other greenhouse gases the area releases into the atmosphere, or how much is absorbed. With the EU research project CarboAfrica, European and African teams have come together to deepen their understanding of the current state of the ...

  • Soil carbon cycling and the global carbon balance

    Like most things that exist underground, plant roots are out-of-sight and easily forgotten, but while flowers, leaves, and other aboveground plant parts are more familiar, plant roots are equally deserving of our appreciation. Beneath every towering tree, tasty crop, and dazzling ornamental lies a root system that makes it all possible. Roots provide anchor and support for plants, extract water ...

  • International soil conference opens in Brisbane

    “It’s underfoot but often forgotten yet our soil resources are crucial to our very existence,” says the Chief of CSIRO Land and Water, Dr Neil McKenzie. “Any gardener or farmer knows that soil is an astonishing material. It’s the natural reactor in the landscape that forms the basis for our supply of food, clean water and biodiversity.” Australia is a net ...

  • Signs of recovery in polluted Czech forests

    Pollution has had a significant impact on European forests, where it disrupts many natural processes. Forests in Central Europe are among the most severely affected by pollution worldwide. New research1 from the Czech Republic suggests that attempts to cut sulfur-based pollution (such as acid rain) could also be important in a longer-term reduction of nitrate output from forest watersheds as ...

  • John Deere Introduces 4640 Universal Display for Tractors

    The new John Deere 4640 Universal Display raises the bar for performance, uptime and cost of operation as part of the latest John Deere Generation 4 Operating System. For customers, this translates into better data collection, increased application functionality, and greater choice for monitoring and managing many tractor-driven field operations. The new ...


    By John Deere

  • Science preview: October 2012 meetings of agronomy, crop, and soil science societies

    How are manufactured nanoparticles affecting the world’s terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems? What are the linkages between organic farming, healthy soils, and healthy foods? Can “grey” wastewater be safely used to irrigate farmland and replenish groundwater supplies? What strategies are underway around the world to sustain food security in the face of climate change? These are ...

  • World Soil Day hails symbiotic role of pulses to boost sustainable agriculture

    Soil and pulses can make major contributions to the challenge of feeding the world's growing population and combating climate change, especially when deployed together, according to Soils and Pulses: Symbiosis for Life, a new report by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization released on  ...

  • Smart farming recoups IoT investment

    In the United States, California avocado farmer Kurt Bantle experimented with Internet of Things (IoT) connected technology to see if costly water consumption could be reduced in growing his 900 avocado trees. He spent US$8,200 for LoRa stations with soil moisture sensors, valve controllers, LoRa gateway and cellular backhaul. Cellular backhaul refers to a gateway that connects the farm to the ...


    By OMI Industries (OMI)

  • Fertilizer Use to Surpass 200 Million Tonnes in 2018

    Global fertilizer use is likely to rise above 200.5 million tonnes in 2018, 25 percent higher than recorded in 2008. World fertilizer consumption will grow by 1.8 percent a year through 2018, according to FAO's new report "World fertilizer trends and outlook to 2018." At the same time "the global capacity of fertilizer products, intermediates and raw materials will increase further," the report ...

  • New strategy aims to reduce agricultural ammonia

    As concerns about air pollution from large dairies and other concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) continue to mount, scientists are reporting a practice that could cut emissions of an exceptionally abundant agricultural gas—ammonia—by up to 30%. In the May-June 2011 issue of the Journal of Environmental Quality, a team led by Mark Powell, a soil scientist with the USDA ...

  • Farmer uses poultry power to generate brass from muck

    Great Ynys Farm will use poultry power to become more eco friendly and generate a new income stream as a renewable energy generator.  The Hereford-based farm, which has 125 acres of arable land and a 90,000 broiler chicken operation, will use anaerobic digestion (AD) to convert chicken litter into biogas for renewable electricity and heat generation. The green electricity will power the ...


    By ENER-G

  • Global warming having direct impact on the world`s key fishing grounds

    Climate change is emerging as the latest threat to the world's dwindling fish stocks a new report by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) suggests. At least three quarters of the globe's key fishing grounds may become seriously impacted by changes in circulation as a result of the ocean's natural pumping systems fading and falling they suggest. These natural pumps, dotted at sites across the ...

  • Soil biodiversity: functions, threats and tools for policy makers

    Human societies rely on the vast diversity of benefits provided by nature, such as food, fibres, construction materials, clean water, clean air and climate regulation. All the elements required for these ecosystem services depend on soil, and soil biodiversity is the driving force behind their regulation. With 2010 being the International Year of Biodiversity and with ...


    By European Commission

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