plant pathogen damage News

  • Soil gives away soybean pathogen’s presence

    New research reveals that soil pH is a useful guide for farmers and agronomists to detect and manage soybean cyst nematode, a devastating soybean pathogen. The investigation uncovered a relationship between high soil pH, which is already outside the ideal growing conditions for soybean, and high populations of cyst nematodes. Scientists from Iowa State University and University of ...

  • Invasive hogweed plant’s impacts decrease over time

    The damaging impacts of the invasive alien plant, giant hogweed, decline over time, new research from the Czech Republic has concluded. Although this plant initially reduces the native species richness of the grasslands it colonises, the study found that numbers of native species increased again in sites that had been colonised by hogweed for 40 years or longer. Invasive alien species are one of ...

  • European trees planted in China to identify potentially invasive species in our forests

    Most of the exotic species which attack plants in Europe now come from Asia. INRA scientists, together with teams from the Academy of Sciences in Beijing and the Forestry University in Zhejiang have devised a new method for detecting potential invaders in their region of origin before they are introduced on another continent. European sentinel trees were planted in China for four years, and ...

  • Testing new biological plant protection products for effectiveness and practical feasibility

    A naturally occurring fungus codenamed ‘H39’ might be the long-sought biological defence against the dreaded apple scab. “This fungus has not only been tested for its ability to fight the pathogen. The new Select BioControl method was also used to immediately assess the practical feasibility of deploying it as a commercial product,” says Dr Jürgen Köhl of ...

  • USDA Makes $5 Million in Farm Bill Support for National Clean Plant Network Available

    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack announced today the allocation of $5 million to support 19 projects under the National Clean Plant Network (NCPN) funded under the Agriculture Act of 2014 (the 2014 Farm Bill). NCPN-funded facilities provide high-quality propagative plant material that is free of plant pathogens and pests that can otherwise cause economic losses to the ...

  • Wageningen UR Greenhouse Horticulture will test disinfection equipment and substances

    Starting this autumn it is possible to test disinfection equipment for pathogen elimination in soilless cropping methods. It is also possible to test substances or products to eliminate pathogens from the nutrient solution and to clean the piping. The last group can also be tested for remnants which may be able to damage plants. According a strict protocol pathogenic bacteria, fungi or virus will ...

  • UF/IFAS Finding Could Help Farmers Stop Potato, Tomato Disease

    A University of Florida scientist has pinpointed Mexico as the origin of the pathogen that caused the 1840s Irish Potato Famine, a finding that may help researchers solve the $6 billion-a-year disease that continues to evolve and torment potato and tomato growers around the world. A disease called “late blight” killed most of Ireland’s potatoes, while today it costs Florida ...

  • Fungal Infection Almost Sidelines UCLA Football Player

    Earlier this month, the Los Angeles Times published a report about one of UCLA’s cornerbacks and his recent battle with aspergillosis. Aspergillosis is a fungal infection caused by a common fungus known as Aspergillus. According to the article, the player spent more than a month in a hospital fighting the infection. His weight dropped down to 130 pounds, but after successfully ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • UF/IFAS scientists find way to reduce pesticide use and save millions for ornamental industry

    Results of new University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences research may help control some dangerous species of fungi, known as phytophthora — or water molds —  that can cause millions of dollars in damage annually to ornamental plants and some fruit trees. This finding could help reduce fungicide use to control the phytophthora that can menace ...

  • Management Strategies to Reduce Catfacing in Peaches

    For producers of peaches and other orchard-grown produce, managing the orchard floor can present challenges. Unwelcome vegetation on the orchard floor competes with trees for water and nutrients reducing tree growth and productivity, and can be a host for pathogens and insect pests. Utilizing best practices for irrigation and vegetation management in the orchard helps growers to optimize tree ...

  • Bees under bombardment

    More than a dozen factors, ranging from declines in flowering plants and the use of memory-damaging insecticides to the world-wide spread of pests and air pollution, may be behind the emerging decline of bee colonies across many parts of the globe. Scientists are warning that without profound changes to the way human-beings manage the planet, declines in pollinators needed to feed a growing ...

  • Fusarium Infections & IAQ Issues Exposed in New Online Video

    Today, the IAQ Video Network and Cochrane & Associates announced the release of another online video to help educate the public about issues that may impact their health.  The latest educational video discusses Fusarium.   Fusarium is a genus of fungi that is widely distributed in soils and can be a cause of indoor air quality problems in ...


    By Cochrane & Associates, LLC

  • Preserving biodiversity in European forests

    At present, to safeguard biodiversity around a quarter of Europe’s forests is not harvested. Between 2000 and 2005, protected forest areas were increased by almost 40 per cent in area. In addition, farmers have converted significant areas of agricultural land to forests. However, this can sometimes have negative effects: intensification measures such as peat land drainage, fertilisation, genetic ...

  • The lurking menace of weeds

    Today more than a billion people in the world are hungry, the result of flawed policies mainly, but also of wars and revolutions and of natural hazards like floods, droughts, pests and diseases compounded, nowadays, by climate change. But one huge hunger-maker lurks largely unnoticed ... 'Maybe it's because weeds are not very spectacular,' says weed expert Ricardo Labrada-Romero.  'Droughts, ...

  • US fish farms tap former coal mines for water

    In the Appalachian mountains of the United States, growing numbers of fish farmers are raising trout, catfish, and even salmon throughout the valleys of the state of West Virginia. What they'd rather not tell you, however, is that the source of their water is deserted coal mines. Worry not, seafood lovers. According to independent experts from within West Virginia and outside the state, the ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Wheat rust diseases remain a constant but neglected threat

    FAO is calling for countries in the global ‘wheat belt’ to step up monitoring and prevention for wheat rusts – fungal diseases that do especially well in particularly wet seasons. Yields could be affected across North Africa, the Middle East into West and South Asia, which account for more than 30 percent of global wheat output and nearly 40 percent of total land area dedicated ...

  • Gardening and Spring Activities Should Include Learning About Invasive Pests That can Devastate America`s Trees

    Now that spring has arrived, and summer is quickly approaching, The Nature Conservancy, along with nursery industry partners and scientists, encourages people to take the time to learn more about tree-killing invasive insects and diseases as they spend more time outdoors. Everyday citizens can help detect forest pests and prevent their spread when are they are observant of the trees and forests ...


    By The Nature Conservancy

  • Fight against Black Sigatoka must continue to save small Caribbean banana farms

    FAO warns that without increased commitment to combat Black Sigatoka Disease, which has ravaged banana and plantain production in the Caribbean, vulnerable people could face food insecurity if the disease situation is allowed to further deteriorate. Black Sigatoka disease is considered one of the most dangerous diseases of banana and plantain. It spread from Asia and reached the Caribbean in ...

  • Climate change in Ontario

    Climate-related impacts on water resources, energy, agriculture and natural ecosystems could have profound implications for human health and for the economy of Ontario. Questions remain about whether enough is being done to put in place adaptation measures to blunt some of the worst and unavoidable impacts of climate change in Canada’s most populace province. This fourth article ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • $254,282 in Grants Awarded to Remove Derelict Fishing Gear from Long Island Sound

    Restoration of the Long Island Sound marine habitat took a major step forward today with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation's announcement of two grant awards to Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County (CCE) to identify and remove more than 118 metric tons (260,000 lbs.) of marine debris, including abandoned lobster pots, from the Sound. Through these awards, ...


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