plant pathogen management News

  • Soil gives away soybean pathogen’s presence

    New research reveals that soil pH is a useful guide for farmers and agronomists to detect and manage soybean cyst nematode, a devastating soybean pathogen. The investigation uncovered a relationship between high soil pH, which is already outside the ideal growing conditions for soybean, and high populations of cyst nematodes. Scientists from Iowa State University and University of ...

  • Managing Late Blight of Potatoes and Tomatoes

    Late blight is one of the most serious diseases of potatoes and tomatoes worldwide, resulting in significant yield and quality losses annually. In Alberta, late blight occurs infrequently, but can have devastating impacts in the years when it reaches epidemic levels.  “This disease is caused by a fungal pathogen called Phytophthora infestans,” says Robert Spencer, ...

  • Invasive hogweed plant’s impacts decrease over time

    The damaging impacts of the invasive alien plant, giant hogweed, decline over time, new research from the Czech Republic has concluded. Although this plant initially reduces the native species richness of the grasslands it colonises, the study found that numbers of native species increased again in sites that had been colonised by hogweed for 40 years or longer. Invasive alien species are one of ...

  • Biodiversity is the basis for Integrated Pest Management

    Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is now the norm in agriculture and horticulture. All stakeholders – national and European government agencies and public bodies, agriculture and horticulture organisations, businesses, universities and research institutes – agree with this statement. "More biodiversity and the use of resistant plants are crucial to the successful implementation of ...

  • Management Strategies to Reduce Catfacing in Peaches

    For producers of peaches and other orchard-grown produce, managing the orchard floor can present challenges. Unwelcome vegetation on the orchard floor competes with trees for water and nutrients reducing tree growth and productivity, and can be a host for pathogens and insect pests. Utilizing best practices for irrigation and vegetation management in the orchard helps growers to optimize tree ...

  • Grafting helps pepper plants deal with drought

    Joining a high-yield pepper plant sapling to the roots of a strong and resistant variety could help pepper farmers cope with lower rainfall, a study has found. An experiment using the technique of merging two plants, known as grafting, resulted in higher fruit yield during periods of less rain. Plants also grew much better in salty soil, a by-product of drought, the researchers ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • New test can detect plant viruses faster, cheaper

    A new test could save time and money diagnosing plant viruses, some of which can destroy millions of dollars in crops each year in Florida, says a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher. In a newly published study, Jane Polston, a UF/IFAS plant pathology professor, examined several ways to detect the DNA genome of begomoviruses. These viruses have emerged ...

  • USDA Makes $5 Million in Farm Bill Support for National Clean Plant Network Available

    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack announced today the allocation of $5 million to support 19 projects under the National Clean Plant Network (NCPN) funded under the Agriculture Act of 2014 (the 2014 Farm Bill). NCPN-funded facilities provide high-quality propagative plant material that is free of plant pathogens and pests that can otherwise cause economic losses to the ...

  • UF/IFAS Finding Could Help Farmers Stop Potato, Tomato Disease

    A University of Florida scientist has pinpointed Mexico as the origin of the pathogen that caused the 1840s Irish Potato Famine, a finding that may help researchers solve the $6 billion-a-year disease that continues to evolve and torment potato and tomato growers around the world. A disease called “late blight” killed most of Ireland’s potatoes, while today it costs Florida ...

  • Resistance genes from wild relatives of crops offer opportunities for more sustainable agriculture worldwidew

    Growing crops with stacks of two or more resistance genes from closely related species, introduced into the crop via for instance genetic engineering, combined with the simultaneous introduction of resistance management, can ensure the long-term resistance of these plants to economically significant and aggressive diseases. The combination offers opportunities to make agriculture more sustainable ...

  • Southern soils mitigate manure microbes

    That swine manure sprayed on to fields adds valuable nutrients to the soil is well known. But what is not known is whether all that manure is bringing harmful bacteria with it. A new study looks at the levels of nutrients and bacteria in soils of fields that have been sprayed with manure for fifteen years or more. The research team, composed of scientists from the USDA-ARS Crop Science Research ...

  • The problem expands for avocado growers: 9 beetle species carry deadly fungus

    Many people love their avocados – not to mention guacamole dip. So it was bad enough when scientists said a beetle was ravaging avocado trees in South Florida. Then scientists found out that the redbay ambrosia beetle — originally determined to transmit laurel wilt — is rare in avocado groves but that six other beetle species could carry the laurel wilt pathogen. That’s ...

  • Combatting diseases in the greenhouse before they become visible

    A camera that maps photosynthesis, a DNA test that can measure the slightest traces of pathogens, or a precision spray system that only affects the plant and not the surrounding air… The Gezonde Kas (‘healthy greenhouse’) project has, over the last four years, allowed for the development of a sophisticated system of monitoring and disease control. It is now ready for practical ...

  • Marrone Bio Innovations` Regalia® Biofungicide Label Significantly Expanded

      DAVIS, Calif., Jan. 18, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Marrone Bio Innovations today announced that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved a significant label expansion for Regalia®, a biofungicide that boosts plants' natural defenses to fight fungal and bacterial diseases. The label expansion includes new soil applications, ...

  • Renewed cooperation between CIHEAM and FAO

    The International Centre for Advanced Mediterranean Agronomic Studies (CIHEAM) based in Paris and FAO will strengthen their cooperation under an agreement signed at FAO's Rome headquarters this week. The Agreement of Cooperation was signed by Bertrand Hervieu, Secretary General of CIHEAM and Hervé Lejeune, FAO Assistant Director-General and Directeur de Cabinet. In it, both organizations agreed ...

  • RRI, STRASA and PAU hold workshop on major rice pests and diseases in Southeast Asia

    STRASA (Stress Tolerant Rice for Africa and South Asia), the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), and Punjab Agricultural University (PAU), Ludhiana, India held a two-day review and planning workshop on major rice pests and diseases in Southeast Asia at Punjab Agricultural University on 15-16 September. Twenty cooperators (13 from India , 3 from IRRI, 3 from Bangladesh. and 1 from Nepal) ...

  • Fungal Infection Almost Sidelines UCLA Football Player

    Earlier this month, the Los Angeles Times published a report about one of UCLA’s cornerbacks and his recent battle with aspergillosis. Aspergillosis is a fungal infection caused by a common fungus known as Aspergillus. According to the article, the player spent more than a month in a hospital fighting the infection. His weight dropped down to 130 pounds, but after successfully ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • Genetics not enough to increase wheat production

    The deep gene pool that has allowed wheat to achieve ever increasing gains in yield may be draining. Crop scientists estimate that 50% of the gain in wheat production over the past century has been due to breeding. According to a new study, however, that improvement has been slowing since the late 1980s, with little chance that future increases in yield can be met by breeding efforts alone. The ...

  • Protectuin for Pollinators: Conservation Groups and Scientists Push USDA to Save Wild Bumble Bees

    Leading conservation and science voices renewed their call today for a key federal agency to protect bumble bees in light of numerous threats contributing to population declines. The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Defenders of Wildlife and Dr. Robbin Thorp asked the Secretary of Agriculture to take action on a petition to regulate the ...

  • Syngenta launches new biological seed treatment

    Syngenta today announced the launch of the EPIVIO brand family, a range of new biostimulants which address abiotic stresses through seed treatment. Over the last five years Syngenta has developed abiotic stress management testing capabilities to simulate drought, heat, cold and nutrient stresses. Seed treatment products resulting from this R&D platform are now commercialized under the ...


    By Syngenta

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