plant pathogen monitoring News

  • European trees planted in China to identify potentially invasive species in our forests

    Most of the exotic species which attack plants in Europe now come from Asia. INRA scientists, together with teams from the Academy of Sciences in Beijing and the Forestry University in Zhejiang have devised a new method for detecting potential invaders in their region of origin before they are introduced on another continent. European sentinel trees were planted in China for four years, and ...

  • UF/IFAS Finding Could Help Farmers Stop Potato, Tomato Disease

    A University of Florida scientist has pinpointed Mexico as the origin of the pathogen that caused the 1840s Irish Potato Famine, a finding that may help researchers solve the $6 billion-a-year disease that continues to evolve and torment potato and tomato growers around the world. A disease called “late blight” killed most of Ireland’s potatoes, while today it costs Florida ...

  • Resistance genes from wild relatives of crops offer opportunities for more sustainable agriculture worldwidew

    Growing crops with stacks of two or more resistance genes from closely related species, introduced into the crop via for instance genetic engineering, combined with the simultaneous introduction of resistance management, can ensure the long-term resistance of these plants to economically significant and aggressive diseases. The combination offers opportunities to make agriculture more sustainable ...

  • Combatting diseases in the greenhouse before they become visible

    A camera that maps photosynthesis, a DNA test that can measure the slightest traces of pathogens, or a precision spray system that only affects the plant and not the surrounding air… The Gezonde Kas (‘healthy greenhouse’) project has, over the last four years, allowed for the development of a sophisticated system of monitoring and disease control. It is now ready for practical ...

  • Managing Late Blight of Potatoes and Tomatoes

    Late blight is one of the most serious diseases of potatoes and tomatoes worldwide, resulting in significant yield and quality losses annually. In Alberta, late blight occurs infrequently, but can have devastating impacts in the years when it reaches epidemic levels.  “This disease is caused by a fungal pathogen called Phytophthora infestans,” says Robert Spencer, ...

  • Global stem rust tracker unveiled in China

    A global monitoring system was unveiled today to track the spread of devastating wheat pathogens known as stem rusts, at the 2012 Borlaug Global Rust Initiative (BGRI) Technical Workshop in China. The functional surveillance and monitoring network, the Global Cereal Rust Monitoring System ('Rust Tracker'), now covers 27 countries and a large ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Composting of biological waste

    A composting plant based on new technology has been built in Savonlinna, in Finland, and came into operation at the beginning of this year. The technology was supplied by the Finnish company Vimelco Oy. The owner, Konepalvelu Suomalainen Oy, composts separately organic waste collected from the Savonlinna area, and organic waste from the food industry. In addition the nearby local authorities ...


  • Renewed cooperation between CIHEAM and FAO

    The International Centre for Advanced Mediterranean Agronomic Studies (CIHEAM) based in Paris and FAO will strengthen their cooperation under an agreement signed at FAO's Rome headquarters this week. The Agreement of Cooperation was signed by Bertrand Hervieu, Secretary General of CIHEAM and Hervé Lejeune, FAO Assistant Director-General and Directeur de Cabinet. In it, both organizations agreed ...

  • Durably resistant potatoes with wild potato genes offer 80% reduction in chemical control

    A research project into the development of potatoes with sustainable resistance against phytophthora via genetic modification with genes from wild potato varieties and good resistance management (DuRPh) has concluded with a scientific publication on the research results. The Wageningen UR scientists indicated that their approach was successful in developing potato plants which require 80% less ...

  • International seminar on Xylella fastidiosa

    The International Olive Council (IOC) and the International Centre for Advanced Mediterranean Agronomic Studies (CIHEAM), under the Memorandum of Understanding signed in July 2016, have organised a seminar on Xylella fastidiosa¸ the bacterium which, since 2013, has been causing the death of hundreds of olive trees in the Italian region of Apulia, raising grave concerns among all olive ...

  • Keeping tabs on the next generation of transgenic crops

    A team of government and university crop scientists from across Canada has developed a scientific framework for monitoring the release of second-generation genetically modified crops. The framework is designed to assess the risks of novel genes entering wild populations. First-generation genetically modified (GM)/transgenic crops with novel traits have been grown in a number of countries since ...

  • Preserving biodiversity in European forests

    At present, to safeguard biodiversity around a quarter of Europe’s forests is not harvested. Between 2000 and 2005, protected forest areas were increased by almost 40 per cent in area. In addition, farmers have converted significant areas of agricultural land to forests. However, this can sometimes have negative effects: intensification measures such as peat land drainage, fertilisation, genetic ...

  • Videos Highlight National Soybean Rust Program, Encourage Growers to Remain Vigilant

    Growers will find key information to keep in mind about the ongoing threat of soybean rust and actions they can take to minimize potential losses from this disease in two videos now available online. The videos include highlights from numerous research and Extension projects carried out by land-grant university researchers from around the country involved in soybean rust research and ...


    By Ohio State University

  • UF/IFAS researchers use steam to treat citrus greening

    University of Florida researchers are turning to the old-fashioned method of steaming to help treat citrus greening, a disease devastating citrus trees throughout Florida. Reza Ehsani and his UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences colleagues are tenting and then enveloping trees in steam that is 136 degrees Fahrenheit for about 30 seconds in an attempt to kill the ...

  • EPA Approval of IoMax for feedwater expands Biolargo`s robust solutions for poultry industry

    BioLargo, through its commercial partner Clarion Water, obtained EPA registration for the use of aqueous iodine in poultry applications. This registration for poultry marks a key milestone in the commercialization of a full suite of biosecurity solutions aimed at mitigating the risk of avian flu and other common pathogens such as E. ...


    By Biolargo, Inc.

  • Wheat rust diseases remain a constant but neglected threat

    FAO is calling for countries in the global ‘wheat belt’ to step up monitoring and prevention for wheat rusts – fungal diseases that do especially well in particularly wet seasons. Yields could be affected across North Africa, the Middle East into West and South Asia, which account for more than 30 percent of global wheat output and nearly 40 percent of total land area dedicated ...

  • Where have all the flowers gone?

    Global food production may be approaching another major crisis. Crops around the world are pollinated by honeybees, but bee populations are dying off rapidly due to excessive use of pesticides and other environmental factors. The threat of food production losses is becoming painfully apparent, and the economic, social and environmental costs could be staggering. This growing threat to the global ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Report on Health and Biodiversity Demonstrates Human Health Benefits from Protecting Biodiversity

    A ground-breaking report on biodiversity and health, launched today at the 14th World Congress on Public Health, in Kolkata, India, shows the significant contribution of biodiversity and ecosystem services to better human health. The report, Connecting Global Priorities: Biodiversity and Human Health, demonstrates that the relationship between biodiversity and human health is extensive and ...

  • Reducing the spread of antimicrobial resistance on our farms and in our food

    FAO today pledged to help countries develop strategies for tackling the spread of antimicrobial resistance in their food supply chains, as governments prepare to debate the emerging challenge posed by medicine-resistant "superbugs" next week at the UN General Assembly. The increased use – and abuse – of antimicrobial medicines in both human ...

  • Fight against wheat rust needs sustained investment

    Developing countries need help with crop surveillance and the development of strains resistant to wheat rust, say agricultural research leaders. Today's food security situation is being worsened by strains of wheat rust disease that are emerging more frequently and spreading much faster and to new areas — changes fuelled by ...


    By SciDev.Net

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