plant sample News

  • ARS plant collections help safeguard crops

    In the months ahead, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists plan to collect walnuts from Kyrgyzstan, grasses from Russia, and carrots and sunflowers from fields across the Southeastern United States in efforts that will enhance one of the nation's most effective tools for protecting the food supply. Researchers will make the trips to collect plants with useful ...

  • Invasive hogweed plant’s impacts decrease over time

    The damaging impacts of the invasive alien plant, giant hogweed, decline over time, new research from the Czech Republic has concluded. Although this plant initially reduces the native species richness of the grasslands it colonises, the study found that numbers of native species increased again in sites that had been colonised by hogweed for 40 years or longer. Invasive alien species are one of ...

  • Continuing nightmare in Bhopal: CSE laboratory tests soil, water samples from Union Carbide

    For more than 25 years, the Union Carbide (UCIL) factory has been contaminating the land and water of Bhopal. Latest tests show that groundwater in areas even three km away from the factory contains almost 40 times more pesticides than Indian standards. These are the findings of a study released here today by the New Delhi-based research and advocacy organisation, Centre for Science and ...

  • FAO launches new standards for plant genebanks

    A new FAO publication is aimed at improving conservation of food crops, many of which are crucial to the world’s food and nutrition security.  The publication, Genebank Standards for Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, outlines voluntary, international standards for the many repositories – ...

  • Soil nitrogen increased through greater plant biodiversity

    Increased plant biodiversity improves grassland soil quality by boosting its nitrogen levels, even in the absence of nitrogen-fixing plants, recent research has found. Previous research has shown that grasslands with higher biodiversity had higher levels of carbon and nitrogen. However, in the case of nitrogen it has been suggested that this was purely a result of increased numbers of ...

  • UF/IFAS scientists to conduct experiment on plants in space

    Two University of Florida scientists will go to Kennedy Space Center March 16 for the launch of the SpaceX-3 Dragon capsule to the International Space Station, to send up and then monitor an experiment designed to help them understand biological functions in space. These experiments are important queries into the concepts of where life can exist in the universe and what it takes to survive in ...

  • New test can detect plant viruses faster, cheaper

    A new test could save time and money diagnosing plant viruses, some of which can destroy millions of dollars in crops each year in Florida, says a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher. In a newly published study, Jane Polston, a UF/IFAS plant pathology professor, examined several ways to detect the DNA genome of begomoviruses. These viruses have emerged ...

  • Dioxin risk in soil and plant tissues after long-term biosolids application

    Land application of biosolids (treated municipal sewage sludge) is a common practice because biosolids are a rich source of plant nutrients and organic matter. However, the presence of detectable levels of dioxins in biosolids led to concerns that farmland application may result in accumulation of dioxins in soil and their subsequent translocation through the human food chain because several ...

  • SST Software Updates Sirrus® App With Planting and Crop Protection

    The farming industry will find it easier this season to execute better management decisions while in the field. Sirrus, the precision agriculture app by SST Software, now allows users to record and share tillage, planting, fertilizer, and crop protection operations. Last season, Sirrus was used by thousands of crop consultants and ag service providers to collect field boundaries, record soil ...


    By SST Software

  • Some plants are more sensitive to herbicides during reproductive stages of life cycle

    This study assessed the effects of herbicides on non-target plants in Denmark and Canada. The findings showed that some plants are more sensitive to herbicides in the reproductive stages of their life cycle and can experience delays in flowering and reduced seed production. The authors say future ecological assessments should consider reproductive outcomes. Herbicides are some of the most widely ...

  • CITES conference takes decisive action to halt decline of tropical timber, sharks, manta rays and a wide range of other plants and animals

    Rapidly rising demand for these precious tropical hardwoods has led to serious concerns that unregulated logging is depleting populations of already rare species. The triennial World's Wildlife Conference closed today with robust measures adopted to protect precious timber and marine species from overexploitation. 170 governments have turned to CITES to ensure the legal, sustainable and traceable ...

  • Chinese farmers recognize the quality of a Miedema CP42 planter

    On April 21st, BAOTC (daughter company of APH Group and Omnivent) organized a field demonstration with a Miedema CP42 mounted potato planter in Guyuan, China. BAOTC is exclusive distributor of Miedema products in China. During the morning session there was a presentation about Miedema potato planters and about the Dewulf RS2060 harvesters. In the afternoon, engineer Houjin Ai explained ...


    By APH Group

  • The Quest ATR is perfect for testing soil

    The ecological health of soil can be monitored with the Quest ATR. The organic and mineral components of soil can be established by testing with ATR-IR spectroscopy. Check your plants/crops/etc have the right nutrients for good health. Make sure there is enough calcium, not too much nitrogen or carbon. Map large areas according to the deficit or abundance of minerals. The ...


    By Specac Limited

  • Indian law haulting biodiversity research

    A group of Indian botanists say that the country's stringent biodiversity laws are stifling research. In an article in the latest issue of Current Science (25 January), published by the Indian Academy of Sciences, the scientists say India's 'draconian' rules on free exchange of biological samples could 'totally isolate Indian biodiversity researchers and is akin to a self-imposed siege on ...

  • MARVIN™ technology saves agriculture & horticulture time and money

    Four hundred thousand seedlings, nearly half of what a plant grower of, say, young tomato plants, produces in one season; this is the amount that sorting machines with the MARVIN technology can process in a single day. They rapidly make 3D models of the plants and accurately evaluate their size and features in milliseconds. “The information can be automatically recorded in a database and ...

  • Asteroid Soil Could Fertilise Farms in Space

    OK, so we’re not quite ready to supply horizontal storage tanks and vertical storage tanks for farms in space just yet and we don’t think there will be a huge demand for rainwater tanks either, but an interesting article in New Scientist details how there is enough fertilizer zipping around in space to grow crops for generations of space colonisers and can be found on asteroids. It ...


    By ENDURAMAXX

  • Simple method to estimate soil carbon stocks in grassland

    Storage of carbon in soil helps to keep land fertile and regulates the climate, and is therefore an important ecosystem service. However, mapping of soil carbon stocks currently uses unreliable measures. This study used data from a national survey of English grasslands to show that soil carbon stocks can be accurately predicted using simple measures of soil and climatic conditions. Two to three ...

  • ARS helps preserve indigenous crops in Ecuador

    An Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist is working with an international group of researchers on a project to improve the livelihoods of people in rural Ecuador by promoting the conservation and use of indigenous crops. People in and around Cotacachi, in the northern Andean highlands, have been farming for thousands of years, and the result is a stunning diversity of crops, some of them ...

  • Ammonia emissions detected upwind from an intensive poultry farm

    High levels of ammonia were observed at a Natura 2000 site nearly three kilometres upwind from an intensive poultry farm in a recent study. While downwind effects of ammonia emissions are to be expected, this study suggests that ammonia emissions could be a significant source of nitrogen pollution even upwind from the source. Intensive livestock operations, such as poultry farms, are significant ...

  • Method developed to measure solute movement in soils

    Scientists from Aarhus University and Aalborg University in Denmark have developed a new method for measuring the movement of solutes in intact soil. Improving on the existing method, the new procedure can be used on intact, undisturbed soil and provides more confident estimates. Movement, or diffusion, of solutes in soils is involved in many processes of agronomical, environmental and technical ...

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