plant trait News

  • Ceres Receives $3.5 million from USAID for Trait Stacks

    Energy crop company Ceres, Inc. (Nasdaq: CERE) today announced that the U.S. Agency for International Development, or USAID, has expanded its grant to the company to develop traits in rice for Asia. Based on Ceres' success to date, USAID will provide an additional $3.5 million to Ceres over the next four years to extend field trialing and development of the ...


    By Ceres

  • ARS plant collections help safeguard crops

    In the months ahead, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists plan to collect walnuts from Kyrgyzstan, grasses from Russia, and carrots and sunflowers from fields across the Southeastern United States in efforts that will enhance one of the nation's most effective tools for protecting the food supply. Researchers will make the trips to collect plants with useful ...

  • High Oleic Soybeans Introduced for 2016 Planting in Iowa

    Iowa farmers will have an additional profit opportunity in 2016 when high oleic soybeans become available for planting in the state for the first time. “This is different for Iowans, since we’re usually first to get a new soybean trait,” says Delbert Christensen, a soybean farmer from Audubon, Iowa and farmer-leader with the United Soybean Board. “These varieties have been ...


    By United Soybean Board (USB)

  • The J.R. Simplot Company Announces Innate™ All-Native Plant Technology

    The J. R. Simplot Company's Plant Sciences business announces Innate™ Technology, the all-native biotechnology platform for improving crops, leading to new, better and healthier foods. Innate™ Technology is a patented plant biotechnology process that works with a plant's own genes to ...


    By J.R. Simplot Company

  • Plant characteristics can predict ecosystem services provided by green roofs

    Simple characteristics of plant species — such as height or leaf size — can be used to predict the ecosystem services provided by the green roofs they grow on, a new study suggests. The researchers suggest that their method could be used to screen the thousands of potential plant species in order to optimize green roof design. Green roofs on buildings are able to provide multiple ...

  • Plant Life about melons, apple scab and big data

    The main article in the January issue of Plant Life is titled 'Understanding melons' and Sander Peters, bio-informatics scientist at Wageningen UR, is interviewed about the '100 Melon genome project'. Also scientist Jürgen Kohl tells about the Select Biocontrol method and you can read about the workshop 'Data-driven innovations in the agri-food industries', on 18 and 19 March in Wageningen. ...

  • Syngenta in cellulosic fuel collaboration to increase ethanol plant productivity

    Collaboration to use new process to make cellulosic ethanol from corn kernel fiber Technology to be marketed in combination with Enogen corn Ethanol yield per bushel of corn expected to increase substantially Syngenta announced today an agreement with Cellulosic Ethanol Technologies, LLC to license its ACE (Adding Cellulosic Ethanol) technology, a new process for ethanol ...


    By Syngenta

  • Loss of flowering plants: higher risks with non-random extinction

    A recent study has shown that among flowering plants, species-loss does not occur randomly, but is clustered in families that contain only a small number of species. This suggests that the impact of biodiversity loss will be greater than previously thought and that resources should be targeted on particular plant families. Genetic relationships between flowering plant species (angiosperms) can be ...

  • New training, ultra-high-density planting systems recommended for sweet cherry

    As a result of new dwarfing rootstock selections, improvements in crop protectants, and better methods of postharvest handling and storage, production of sweet cherry is increasing around the world. New sweet cherry cultivars that allow for improved mechanical harvest have also been introduced, and semi-dwarfing and dwarfing rootstocks have improved the potential for developing high-density ...

  • As seas rise, saltwater plants offer hope farms will survive

    On a sun-scorched wasteland near India's southern tip, an unlikely garden filled with spiky shrubs and spindly greens is growing, seemingly against all odds. The plants are living on saltwater, coping with drought and possibly offering viable farming alternatives for a future in which rising seas have inundated countless coastal farmlands. Sea rise, one of the consequences of climate change, now ...


    By Associated Press

  • Iowa Corn Promotion Board and Donald Danforth Plant Science Center Announce Research Cooperation

    The Iowa Corn Promotion Board (ICPB) and The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center (Danforth Center), in St. Louis, Missouri, have announced a formal research cooperation to explore opportunities for innovation in nutrient utilization for Iowa’s corn farmers. The research cooperation has a goal of developing traits that will be used to improve farmer productivity and manage nutrients ...

  • World Water Day brings Message of Conservation & Plant Science Contributions from CropLife Asia

    As the world marks World Water Day, CropLife Asia took the opportunity to encourage greater awareness around the diminishing availability of this precious resource and highlighted the critical role that plant science technology plays in promoting greater water conservation in agriculture use. Projections have the global population eclipsing nine billion inhabitants by the year 2050, and Asia ...


    By Japan Corporate News - JCN

  • Arcadia Biosciences and African Agricultural Technology Foundation collaborate on test planting of nitrogen use efficient rice

    Arcadia Biosciences, Inc., an agricultural technology company focused on developing technologies and products that benefit the environment and human health, and the African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF) today announced the planting of the first field trial of Nitrogen Use Efficient (NUE) rice in Africa. The NUE rice field trial is the result of more than five years of collaboration ...


    By Arcadia Biosciences, Inc.

  • Wild Tomato Species Focus of Antioxidant Study

    Tomatoes are known to be rich in antioxidants such as vitamin C, lycopene, β-carotene, and phenolics. Antioxidants, substances capable of delaying or inhibiting oxidation processes caused by free radicals, are of interest to consumers for their health-related contributions, and to plant breeders for their ability to provide plants with natural resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. While ...

  • Dow AgroSciences Receives U.S. Patent for Enlist™ Corn

    Dow AgroSciences LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Dow Chemical Company (NYSE: DOW) announced today the issuance of U.S. Patent Number 8,598,413 for the company’s lead 2,4-D herbicide tolerance event in corn. The corn event is based on one of Dow AgroSciences’ highly anticipated Enlist™ herbicide-tolerant traits, and provides robust tolerance to broadleaf and grass ...


    By Dow AgroSciences LLC

  • Scientists find four-leaf clover gene

    Ending a period of “bad luck” for clover researchers, scientists report finding the gene that turns ordinary three-leaf clovers into the coveted four-leaf types. Masked by the three-leaf gene and strongly influenced by environmental condition, molecular markers now make it possible to detect the presence of the gene for four-leaves and for breeders to work with it. The results of the ...

  • Nitrogen Use Efficient Rice Demonstrates an Average Yield Increase of 30 Percent in Four Years of Field Trials

    Four years of field trials with a leading line of Nitrogen Use Efficient (NUE) rice have demonstrated an average 30 percent yield increase over conventional controls. These results were reported jointly today by Arcadia Biosciences, Inc., an agricultural technology company, the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and the African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF). CIAT has ...


    By Arcadia Biosciences, Inc.

  • Syngenta Petitions Court to Protect Growers` Unrestricted Access to Grain Outlets for New Technology

    Syngenta in North America today filed a complaint in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Iowa against Bunge North America ("Bunge") for having violated a number of Federal and State laws.  Syngenta alleges Bunge is attempting to block the legal merchandising of ...


  • Burundi set to embrace hybrid maize seeds

    Farmers in Burundi are set to benefit from new high-yielding, fast-maturing hybrid maize seeds that are also resistant to maize streak virus. The varieties are being tested by the Burundi Institute of Agronomic Sciences (ISABU) and should be available to farmers in September. Two seed companies, Pannar and Naseco, based ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Predicting disease and improving crops through genetics

    Can scientists accurately predict when an individual will develop a disease? What if we could predict how to increase drought resistance in plants? Or offer patients personalized medicine? Researchers are looking for answers to these questions and more using a plant or animal’s obvious traits, called phenotype prediction, a field that will be discussed in a free workshop presented by the ...

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