potato leave News

  • Managing Late Blight of Potatoes and Tomatoes

    Late blight is one of the most serious diseases of potatoes and tomatoes worldwide, resulting in significant yield and quality losses annually. In Alberta, late blight occurs infrequently, but can have devastating impacts in the years when it reaches epidemic levels.  “This disease is caused by a fungal pathogen called Phytophthora infestans,” says Robert Spencer, ...

  • Vegetables can absorb heavy metals from contaminated irrigation water

    Certain vegetables take up heavy metals from contaminated water used for irrigation, a new study finds. The researchers grew vegetables in greenhouses similar to field conditions in Greece and found that concentrations of nickel and chromium increased in potatoes and onions, but not in carrots, when irrigated with water containing contaminant levels similar to those found in industrial ...

  • Basic food crops dangerously vulnerable

    In the case of wheat, for instance, as a deadly new strain of Black Stem Rust devastates harvests across Africa and Arabia, and threatens the staple food supply of a billion people from Egypt to Pakistan, the areas where potentially crop and life-saving remnant wild wheat relatives grow are only minimally protected. “Our basic food plants have always been vulnerable to attack from new strains of ...

  • How much water is needed to grow bioenergy crops?

    A Dutch study has assessed the water requirements of 13 bioenergy crops across the world. The findings could help select the best crops and locations to produce bioenergy. The EU climate action and renewable energy package has set a target of increasing the share of renewable energy to 20 per cent of energy used by 20201. This includes a minimum 10 per cent share for transport, which could ...

  • Global Forum for Innovations in Agriculture

    The Global Forum for Innovations in Agriculture (GFIA) is presenting itself to the outside world as ‘the world's award-winning sustainable agriculture event’. With 40 ministerial delegations and numerous top figures from the agrifood world, this trade fair and conference is guaranteed to feature many innovations in a wide range of fields. As an innovation partner, Wageningen UR is ...

  • How to prevent the Xanthomonas bacterium from spreading

    Growers of strawberries and strawberry planting material are terrified of the quarantine organism Xanthomonas fragariae. If the bacterium is found, the affected parcel of land has to be partially or even fully cleared. Commissioned by trade association Plantum and the Strawberry Research Foundation, Wageningen UR performed research into how the pathogen is spread in order to prevent spreading. ...

  • New flood-protection strategies for the north

    We have long believed in the Netherlands that we are safe from flooding as long as our dikes are high enough. However, dikes will always be vulnerable, one reason being the continued sea-level rise. Because of this, the concept of ‘multi-layered safety’ ('meerlaagsveiligheid') was introduced in the Delta Programme. Alterra and HKV have applied this concept to the islands and mainland ...

  • Dangerous Pesticides Released into Rural Residencies

    Residents of Melrose, Minnesota were exposed to heavy doses of harmful pesticides after a crop duster released chemicals onto nearby farms, according to the Huffington Post. The citizens of Melrose claim that the pesticides drifted into their homes through air conditioning vents and sickened them. Within minutes of exposure, Bonnie Wirts claims her heart began to race, and she struggled to ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • Keeping a pulse on the soil

    Leaving behind stubble is not ideal when shaving, but it’s a good practice to leave behind crop “stubble” after harvest. According to soil scientist Frank Larney, crop residue anchors the soil against wind and water erosion. Avoiding bare soils is one part of a soil conservation package he and his research team demonstrate in a 12-year experiment growing pulses in southern ...

  • Controlled ‘reset’ for nematode-infested soil

    Harmful nematodes that damage the soil can be controlled by creating an environment in which they are temporarily deprived of oxygen. Covering the soil with plastic film or a layer of water encourages anaerobic bacteria to produce fatty acids, which will kill most nematodes. “It does sometimes take a while,” says Leendert Molendijk, soil expert at Wageningen UR. Molendijk and his ...

  • Is the environment a moral dilemma?

    This season, religion is playing an important role in the discussions around issues like pollution, water depletion, resource hoarding, and emission-driven atmospheric and oceanic changes. Where does science end and morality begin? The separation of church and state in discussions about the environment is breaking down. As Michael Nelson, co-author of ...

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