rice scientist News

  • US `plans cut to global agricultural research funds`

    Despite rising food prices and restrictions on food exports the United States is planning to cut funding to international agricultural research, scientists claim. In February this year officials from the US Agency for International Development (USAID) warned that a cut in funding was likely. The actual figure is yet to be announced, but it could be as much as 75 per cent according to a ...

  • Agricultural technologies must be `appropriate`

    How an agricultural technology is generated and where it comes from — be it through local efforts or global centres —  are not as important for development as whether the product is appropriate, says development expert, Sara Delaney. 'An appropriate technology is accessible, affordable, easy-to-use and maintain, effective — and most importantly, it serves a real need', says Delaney. A ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Crop yields stall in China, India

    China and India, the world's two most populous countries, are beset by stagnation in the production of staples like rice, wheat, soybean and maize (corn), says a new study on crop yield growth. Based on statistics from around the world during the 1951– 2008 period, the study 'Recent patterns of crop yield growth and stagnation', says that for some crops in China and India the spatial extent ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Genetic change could make crops thrive on salty soils

    Scientists have genetically modified plants to tolerate high levels of salt — offering a potential solution to growing food in salty soils. The researchers inserted a gene to remove salt — in the form of sodium ions — from water taken up by the plant before it reaches the leaves, where it does most damage. The research was published in The Plant Cell this month (7 July). High salinity reduces ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Can GM crops feed the hungry?

    Golden Rice burst into the public imagination a decade ago, in the form of a cover article in Time magazine that claimed the genetically modified (GM) rice could 'save a million kids a year'. The rice gets its golden hue from an excess of beta carotene, a precursor to vitamin A that could help half a million children who go blind each year from an often-fatal vitamin A deficiency. But ten years ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • India-UK fund to boost agro-innovation in Africa and Asia

    The Indian and UK governments are tapping into agricultural innovation outside the traditional international development community with the launch of a £20 million (US$32 million) programme for food security. Sustainable Crop Production Research for International Development (SCPRID) will allow scientists to research stressors, ranging from pests to climate change, on five key crops — ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Understanding why rye works as a cover crop

    Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists may soon find a way to enhance the weed-killing capabilities of a cereal grain that enriches the soil when used as a winter cover crop. Rye is often grown in winter and killed in the spring, so the dead stalks can be flattened over soybean and vegetable fields to block sunlight and prevent spring weeds from getting the light they need to germinate. ...

  • Focus on Gender: women are more than agricultural victims

    The editor of a recent UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) report has concluded that smallholder farmers must be involved in biotechnology and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Crops and Weeds: Global climate change`s first responders

    A team of Agricultural Research Service (ARS) plant physiologists is studying how global climate change could affect food crop production--and prompt the evolution of even more resilient weeds. Lewis Ziska, Richard Sicher and Jim Bunce all work at the ARS Crops Systems and Global Change Laboratory in Beltsville, Md. Over the past several years, the three scientists have conducted research on a ...

  • Research collaboration to deliver ‘healthier’ grains

    The new ‘High Fibre Grains Cluster’ will focus on wheat, barley and rice. One of the primary research goals is to boost the amount of beneficial compounds, such as beta glucans and arabinoxylans, which are key contributors to the soluble component of dietary fibre in the various grains. The collaboration between CSIRO’s Food Futures Flagship, The University of Adelaide, The ...

  • Climate change will hit Indian cereals, benefit legumes

    Indian farmers could be producing less rice and wheat and more legumes as a result of global warming, a senior crop scientist has said. Climate change would have a negative impact on cereal crops such as wheat and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Water for food, water for life!

    The International Water Management Institute (IWMI) has released an online publication about the future of global agricultural water supplies. The report, Water for Food, Water for Life: A Comprehensive Assessment of Global Water Management, took five years to complete and incorporates the ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • African Green Revolution is possible

    The time is ripe to revolutionise agriculture in Africa, says World Food Prize winner Gebisa Ejeta, writing in Science. When the Green Revolution swept across Asia in the 1960s, Africa had neither the human and institutional capacity, nor the right crops — the Green Revolution focused on wheat and rice, while African staples are sorghum, millet, maize and cassava — to benefit, says Ejeta. But ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • New plant varieties developed to thrive despite climate change

    Nuclear technology is helping scientists unmask the hidden potential in plants, allowing plant breeders to develop new crop varieties that can withstand external stress such as drought, often brought about by climate change. Experts believe that climate change will affect the suitability of land for different types of crops, livestock, fish and pasture. It will also have an impact on the health ...

  • CSIRO and Chinese academy of sciences join forces

    Scientists from CSIRO and CAS will meet in Australia next week to discuss and plan for future research collaborations, with a focus on rice and wheat, which along with corn make up the three most widely grown food crops in the world. Leading CSIRO and CAS researchers in the area of plant genomics will share their latest research findings and also map out the areas where future joint research ...

  • Award for Quinoa project

    The Wageningen UR project 'Salt tolerant Quinoa for food in China, Vietnam and Chile' has received a major prize. The quinoa project is one of the winners of the Securing Water for Food Grand Challenge. The prize is awarded to researcher Robert van Loo during the WWW in Stockholm. In agricultural lands impacted by high salinity, smallholder farmers realized lower-than-average yields and ...

  • Faster and better breeding of sustainable and healthy quinoa

    An international team of scientists, including quinoa breeding experts from Wageningen University & Research, published the complete DNA sequence of quinoa – the food crop that is conquering the world from South America – in Nature magazine on 8 February 2017. Quinoa is rich in essential amino acids and nutritional fibres and does not contain gluten. The crop is important to ...

  • Soil science society of America announces 2010 award recipients

    The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) will present the following 2010 Awards during their Annual Meetings on Oct. 31-Nov. 3 in Long Beach, CA, www.acsmeetings.org. Kirk Scheckel – Marion L. and Chrystie M. Jackson Soil Science Award. Kirk Scheckel is a research soil scientist in the National Risk Management Research Laboratory of ...

  • Pigeon pea genome sequence could boost yields

    More than a billion people could soon benefit from improved yields of the important drought-resistant crop pigeon pea now that its genome has been sequenced by a global partnership. The sequence, published online in Nature Biotechnology last week (6 November), should cut the time it takes to develop higher-yielding pigeon pea varieties from the 6–10 years required for traditional breeding ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • TIP: Experts on drought and dust

    In the 1930s, severe drought in the United States coupled with widespread soil degradation from unsound farming practices led to the Dust Bowl—a period of massive dust storms that caused damage to millions of acres of farmland and forced hundreds of thousands of people to abandon their homes. Now that a host of soil conservation measures are in place, the Dust Bowl is mainly thought of as a ...

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