rice scientist News

  • Research funding and skills key to food for post-2015

    Public spending on agricultural research must double in the next decade if the world is to successfully move to sustainable methods of ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • “Biofortification” boosts nutrients in Africa’s staple crops

    Whether a bowl of rice or a piece of bread, staple foods provide millions of poor people around the world with a source of basic sustenance day in and day out. Now, a new technology promises to make these foods-which provide calories but do not always contain enough of the micronutrients required for good health-more nutritious. People who intake insufficient amounts of iron, zinc, and vitamin A ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • 2012 world food prize recipient among speakers at upcoming meetings of agronomy, crop and soil science societies

    In June, Israeli-American soil scientist Daniel Hillel was named the 2012 recipient of the World Food Prize, the foremost international honor for individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity, or availability of food in the world. Now, Hillel—a more than 50-year member of the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)—is slated to speak at the 2012 ...

  • American society of Agronomy presents 2010 fellows

    The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) will recognize the following individuals as 2010 ASA Fellows at a special Awards Ceremony during their Annual Meeting on Oct. 31-Nov.3 in Long Beach, CA, www.acsmeetings.org. ASA has been selecting outstanding members as Fellows since 1924. Members of the Society nominate worthy colleagues based on their professional ...

  • Insights: The Earth Is Shrinking

    WASHINGTON, DC, November 20, 2006 (ENS) - Our early 21st century civilization is being squeezed between advancing deserts and rising seas. Measured by the land area that can support human habitation, the earth is shrinking. Mounting population densities, once generated solely by the addition of over 70 million people per year, are now also fueled by the relentless advance of deserts and the rise ...

  • GM crops can thrive as climate warms

    Genetically engineering photosynthesis in plants could take advantage of rising global temperatures and increased levels of carbon dioxide, US scientists say. They believe this could achieve much higher yields on the same amount of land and help to stave off the prospect of widespread hunger as human populations increase. Researchers at ...


    By Climate News Network

  • One Billion Hungry: ASA offers new program in South Asia

    The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization released a report on June 19, 2009 stating that one in six people in the world — or more than 1 billion — is now hungry, a historic high. Compared with last year, there are 100 million more people who are hungry, meaning they receive fewer than 1,800 calories a day, the Food and Agriculture Organization said in the new estimate of food insecurity. Almost ...

  • Science: what has it done for the millennium development goals?

    When the United Nations published the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in 2000, with aspirations including the ending of poverty and hunger; the promotion of gender equality and a reduction in child mortality, there was little mention of science. Yet most people involved in working towards the goals accepted that achieving them would rely on the successful application of science. Now, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • New Cassava varieties promise food security in Zanzibar

    Millions of cassava farmers in eastern and central Africa are in distress from viral cassava diseases that are sweeping across the region and ravaging their crops. But their counterparts on the popular tourist island of Zanzibar are undergoing a quiet revolution using new disease-resistant and high-yielding varieties that were introduced three years ago. The four varieties, Kizimbani, Mahonda, ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Rise in CO2 could restrict growing days for crops

    The positive consequences of climate change may not be so positive. Although plants in the colder regions are expected to thrive as average global temperatures rise, even this benefit could be limited. Some tropical regions could lose up to 200 growing days a year, and more than two billion rural people could see their hopes wither on the vine or in the field. Even in temperate zones, there will ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Ice melting faster everywhere

    From the Arctic sea ice to the Antarctic interior and the mountainous peaks of Peru, Alaska, and Tibet, ice is melting at an alarming rate. The accelerating loss of ice sheets, sea ice, and glaciers is one of the most powerful and striking indicators of a warming climate. The most notable ice loss in recent years has been the shrinking of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean. From the beginning of the ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Message from the Drought Crisis: Don’t put all your eggs in America’s breadbasket

    For those who spent this year’s mild winter worrying about how incredibly hot the summer would be, recent damages to crops and homes should come as little surprise. Although the abnormally early spring delivered some benefits—such as one of the best blue crab seasons in a long ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • American society of agronomy announces 2011 award recipients

    The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) will recognize the following individuals at the 2011 Awards Ceremony during their Annual Meeting on Oct. 16-19 in San Antonio, TX, www.acsmeetings.org. Drew Lyon, University of Nebraska-Lincoln - Agronomic Extension Education Award. Drew Lyon is the Fenster Professor of dryland ...

  • “Land Grabs” in Agriculture: Fairer deals needed to ensure opportunity for locals

    The trend of international land grabbing—when governments and private firms invest in or purchase large tracts of land in other countries for the purpose of agricultural production and export—can have serious environmental and social consequences, according to researchers at the Worldwatch Institute. Deals that focus solely on financial profit can leave rural populations more ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • World Soil Day hails symbiotic role of pulses to boost sustainable agriculture

    Soil and pulses can make major contributions to the challenge of feeding the world's growing population and combating climate change, especially when deployed together, according to Soils and Pulses: Symbiosis for Life, a new report by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization released on  ...

  • Agritechnica 2015: Advanced solutions on the preservation of resources and the environment on show at Systems & Components

    Climate change mitigation is clearly about the reduction of emissions. Germany is implementing the G7 resolutions by pursuing a national dialogue on a climate change mitigation plan 2050 which will entail extensive changes for the agricultural industry as well. For the industry to apply new technologies as future-proof solutions the scientific community, manufacturers and farmers will have to ...

  • A `revolution of greens` needed to curb food price crisis

    Food prices have soared to record highs and are projected to increase further in the coming decade, pushing millions of people into hunger and fueling political unrest around the world. The Worldwatch Institute's recently released report, State of the World 2011: Innovations that Nourish the Planet, shows that diversifying food production to include local and indigenous vegetables can help ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Algae could solve world`s fuel crisis

    Genetically modified blue and green algae could be the answer to the world's fuel problems. Bioengineers have already developed algae that produce ethanol, oil and even diesel -- and the only things the organisms need are sunlight, CO2 and seawater. Biochemist Dan Robertson's living gas stations have the dark-green shimmer of oak leaves and are as tiny as E. coli bacteria. Their genetic material ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Brian McClendon, co-founder and VP of Google Earth Awarded Top UN Environment Prize

    Brian McClendon, co-founder and VP of Google Earth is to receive the United Nation's highest environmental accolade, the Champions of the Earth Award 2013, for harnessing the power of technology to support conservation and green economic development. Mr. McClendon was recognized for providing powerful tools, through Google Earth, to monitor the state of the environment, allowing researchers to ...

  • Plans in place to fix world food crisis in place by June, UN

    The United Nations aims to have a comprehensive plan to tackle the global food crisis in place by the beginning of June, 'around which the institutions and leaders around the world can coalesce,' a top UN official said at a news conference here today. Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs John Holmes said that although the breadth and complexity of the issue must be recognized, there ...

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