roses greenhouse News

  • GWorkS-model simulates crop operations in greenhouses

    Wageningen UR Greenhouse Horticulture and Wageningen University, group Farm Technology developed a simulation model for labour in greenhouses. Global competition urges growers to continuously improve labour efficiency and to innovate  crop operations in order to control labour costs and to offer appealing jobs and healthy work conditions in greenhouses. Computer simulation was used to ...

  • Industrialized Countries` Greenhouse Gases Hit Record High

    The total greenhouse gas emissions of 40 industrialized nations rose to an all-time high in 2005, continuing the upward trend of the year before, according to data submitted to the secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. The increases came from the continued economic growth in highly industrialized countries as well as the revived economic growth in former ...

  • New Worker Protection Rules Impact Farm, Greenhouse Workers

    Owners of farms, forests, nurseries and greenhouses that use pesticides in agricultural plant production will have to implement additional safeguards for their pesticide handlers and agricultural workers under a revision to the Worker Protection Standard. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency published the new rules in the Federal Register Nov. 2. Compliance with most of the new rules will be ...


    By Ohio State University

  • UK energy statistics - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Down 1.9% in 2013

    Energy Trends and Quarterly Energy Prices publications are published today 27 March 2014 by the Department of Energy and Climate Change. The publications cover new data for the fourth quarter of 2013 and thus provisional annual data for 2013. This press release focuses on the 2013 annual data. Energy Trends covers statistics on energy production and consumption, in total and by fuel, and provides ...

  • Plants for supporting Orius species

    Orius laevigatus and Orius majusculus are predatory bugs, which are applied in several crops in greenhouses. They can eat many pests species, including nymphs and adults of thrips species, aphids, whtiteflies, eggs of moths, young caterpillars and spider mites. In some crops such as sweet pepper Orius  survives easily. Cut roses are apparently less suitable for oviposition. For ...

  • Dried mushrooms slow climate warming in northern forests

    The fight against climate warming has an unexpected ally in mushrooms growing in dry spruce forests covering Alaska, Canada, Scandinavia and other northern regions, a new UC Irvine study finds. When soil in these forests is warmed, fungi that feed on dead plant material dry out and produce significantly less climate-warming carbon dioxide than fungi in cooler, wetter soil. This came as a surprise ...

  • German manual on progress in environmental protection

    How exactly is the state of the environment in Germany? The answers to this question are provided in the new manual with environmental indicators (Umweltdaten Deutschland – Umweltindikatoren) published by the Federal Environment Agency. Whether it is energy productivity, land use or ...


    By Federal Environment Ministry

  • Beef pollutes more than pork, poultry, study says

    Raising beef for the American dinner table does far more damage to the environment than producing pork, poultry, eggs or dairy, a new study says. Compared with the other animal proteins, beef produces five times more heat-trapping gases per calorie, puts out six times as much water-polluting nitrogen, takes 11 times more water for irrigation and uses 28 times the land, according to the study ...


    By Associated Press

  • FAO Statistical Yearbook paints a big, and detailed, picture of food and agriculture

    The 2013 edition of FAO's Statistical Yearbook released today sheds new light on agriculture's contribution to global warming, trends in hunger and malnutrition and the state of the natural resource base upon which world food production depends. Greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture grew 1.6 percent per year ...

  • UK: In 1st, global temps average could be 1 degree C higher

    This year is on track to be a record 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) hotter than the 19th-century average, hitting a symbolic milestone in the temperature rise that scientists blame mostly on human activities, Britain's weather service said Monday. To measure global warming, scientists compare today's temperature level with that of the latter part of the 19th century, when record ...


    By Associated Press

  • Utilisation of nitrogen and phosphate on dairy farms could be increased

    Nitrogen and phosphate are important fertilisers. But excessive amounts often found in fields and pastures end up polluting the ground and surface water. Furthermore, dairy farmers are squandering their profits by wasting these expensive fertilisers. The Koeien & Kansen [Cattle and Opportunities] project set up by two PhD candidates from Wageningen University, part of Wageningen UR, shows how ...

  • India Protected Cultivation Industry Outlook to 2017 - Government Initiatives Paving the Way for Future Growth

    Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: India Protected Cultivation Industry Outlook ...


    By ReportLinker

  • Croppers pose new threat to Amazon rainforest

    Despite Brazil having made great strides in reducing logging in the Amazon region, a US study says the country faces a renewed threat to its forests. The report’s authors − who focused on the Amazon states of Mato Grosso and Pará, where they interviewed ranchers and meat processors − say the cost of raising beef cattle is prompting many ranchers to consider switching to ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Vast forest fires in Indonesia spawn ecological disaster

    For farmer Achmad Rusli, it was a season of smoke: Ten weeks without sunlight for his oranges, guavas and durians, thanks to deliberately set forest fires that burned a chunk of Indonesia the size of New Jersey. The fires have finally died down with the arrival of monsoon rains, but too late for his crops, which are far too measly to sell. "We had not seen the sun in a two-and-a-half months," ...


    By Associated Press

  • Deadly heat waves are becoming more frequent in California

    From mid July to early August 2006, a heat wave swept through the southwestern United States. Temperature records were broken at many locations and unusually high humidity levels for this typically arid region led to the deaths of more than 600 people, 25,000 cattle and 70,000 poultry in California alone. An analysis of this extreme episode carried out by researchers at Scripps Institution of ...

  • UN says CO2 pollution levels at annual record high

    Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere reached a record high in 2013 as increasing levels of man-made pollution transform the planet, the U.N. weather agency said Tuesday. The heat-trapping gas blamed for the largest share of global warming rose to global concentrations of 396 parts per million last year, the biggest year-to-year change in three decades, the World Meteorological Organization ...


    By Associated Press

  • Planet’s tug-of-war between carrying capacity and rising demand: can we keep this up?

    The global economy continued to grow last year, world population surpassed 7 billion, and the use of energy and other natural resources generally rose. The Worldwatch Institute captures the impacts of this rising consumption and the increasingly risky state of humanity in Vital Signs 2012, the latest compilation of indicators from the Institute’s Vital Signs project. The Washington, ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Tug-of-War between planet`s carrying capacity and rising demand

    The global economy continued to grow last year, world population surpassed 7 billion, and the use of energy and other natural resources generally rose. The Worldwatch Institute captures the impacts of this rising consumption and the increasingly risky state of humanity in Vital Signs 2012, the latest compilation of indicators from the Institute's Vital Signs project. Vital ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Rise in CO2 could restrict growing days for crops

    The positive consequences of climate change may not be so positive. Although plants in the colder regions are expected to thrive as average global temperatures rise, even this benefit could be limited. Some tropical regions could lose up to 200 growing days a year, and more than two billion rural people could see their hopes wither on the vine or in the field. Even in temperate zones, there will ...


    By Climate News Network

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