row crop bird News

  • Insect-eating bats save global maize farmers €0.91 billion a year from crop damage

    Insect-eating bats are estimated to be worth US$ 1 billion (€0.91 billion) a year to maize farmers around the world, a new study has revealed. Not only do bats reduce crop damage by eating adult corn earworm crop pests, they also suppress fungal infections in maize ears. Bats and their habitats need to be better protected for their ecological and economic contributions, say the study’s ...

  • 5 Blueberry Bush Frost Protection Tips and Tricks

    Early March and April is prime season for growing and cultivating blueberry plants and bushes, but are also reminders that the last hints of winter could pop up at any time. Sudden drops in temperature are bad news for blueberry growers, as frost can severely damage blueberry bushes and buds. Learn about five helpful tips and tricks for blueberry bush frost protection in the early months of ...


    By Avian Enterprises, LLC

  • Ethanol`s rise can mean loss of hunting lands

    Pheasants once drew hundreds of weekend hunters to Fairbury, Neb., each fall, filling the 45 rooms at Randy Brown's Capri Motel with sportsmen eager to bag their limits. But times have changed. The native grasslands and milo crops that used to dot surrounding Jefferson County have been overtaken by corn and soy crops. Neither provides the shelter that wildlife once enjoyed. This year's opener ...


    By Associated Press

  • Valtra N113 HiTech aids game management in Finland

    The Korhonen farm in Tervo, Finland, uses a Valtra N113 HiTech to maintain its forests and fields for game management. Nature is everything to this family’s active hunters, who manage their farm with respect for the environment. In this they rely on their Valtra. Antti Korhonen and his son Mikko are active nature lovers and hunters. Their family farm focuses on game management and ...

  • Hudson Valley organic farm produces seeds largely by hand

    Drying corn stalks wilt in late summer sun as Ken Greene tours his crops. Calendula flowers are past bloom and brown. Melon leaves lay crinkled by the dirt. Plants have, literally, gone to seed. A perfect picture for an organic seed harvest. "It looks like hell now, but it's actually good for the seeds," said Greene, co-founder of the Hudson Valley Seed Library. The small business 70 miles ...


    By Associated Press

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