seedling crop News

  • Maize seedlings predict drought Tolerance

    Scientists have developed a new method for measuring drought tolerance in maize. By comparing the shoot-to-root ratio in seedlings stressed by low water, scientists can predict whether a plant has the right mix of genes for adapting to drought conditions. The ideal drought-resistant maize should have a higher ratio of root surface area compared to leaves and stems. Developing enough adult plants ...

  • Vermicompost leachate improves tomato seedling growth

    Worldwide, drought conditions, extreme temperatures, and high soil saline content all have negative effects on tomato crops. These natural processes reduce soil nutrient content and lifespan, result in reduced plant growth and yield, and ultimately translate to lower profits for tomato producers. As an alternative to unsustainable practices such as the use of synthetic fertilizers, producers are ...

  • Simulated Seawater Flooding Decreases Growth of Vegetable Seedlings

    Crop production in coastal areas is threatened by seawater intrusion, which increases soil salinity. Excessive salinity in soil and irrigation water, in combination with waterlogging, can significantly affect the growth and quality for agricultural crops, especially those vegetables that are sensitive to salinity. A new study determined salt-tolerant vegetable seedlings for coastal area ...

  • Light-emitting Diode Sole-source Lighting Effective in Bedding Plant Seedling Production

    In northern latitudes, producers of bedding plants depend on supplemental lighting during the late winter and early spring growing seasons. Unfortunately, these peak times for young plant production are also the darkest. Researchers have determined that a minimum amount of photosynthetic light (daily light integral; DLI) is necessary to produce high-quality young plants in greenhouses. In ...

  • Potentially harmful effects of nanomaterials on soybean crops

    A new study has examined contamination of fully grown soybean plants by two nanomaterials – nano-cerium oxide and nano-zinc oxide. The results could be concerning, as they indicate that the nanomaterials are absorbed by plants, possibly affecting growth, yield, and the fixation of nitrogen in soil, an important ecosytem service. With the rapid expansion of nanotechnology, there is ...

  • GM maize contaminates non-GM crops in Uruguay

    Contamination of traditional maize crops planted near genetically modified (GM) maize fields may be common in Uruguay, where the cultivation of GM maize has been permitted since 2003, scientists have said. A study published in Environmental Biosafety Research (25 March) has found GM seedlings in three ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Cooler Weather Conditions, Late Planting, Impacts Insects on Crops

    Rainy, cooler weather experienced recently throughout the region means slugs may be on the rise in some field crops, says an entomologist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. The rains combined with colder temperatures are ideal slug weather, said Kelley Tilmon, a field crop entomologist with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Neonicotinoids: may reduce crop yields by poisoning insects that eat slug pests

    Beetles that are helpful to farmers can be poisoned if they feed on slugs that have eaten crops treated with neonicotinoids, a new study reports. The slugs themselves are not harmed by neonicotinoids. In American field trials, researchers found that plots planted with neonicotinoid-treated soybeans contained more slugs, fewer beetle predators and had 5% lower yields. The insecticide may be ...

  • AgroFresh introduces LandSpring technology, an innovative pre-planting application that reduces transplant shock in tomatoes and peppers

    AgroFresh Solutions, Inc. (NASDAQ: AGFS), a global leader in produce freshness solutions, has introduced its new LandSpring product, a 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) technology for use on transplanted vegetable seedlings.  LandSpring, currently registered for use on tomato and pepper crops, reduces transplant shock resulting in lower seedling mortality and faster crop establishment, which ...


    By AgroFresh

  • GM seeds can remain in fields longer than previously thought

    Despite management practices designed to reduce the risk of genetically modified (GM) volunteer plants setting seed, new research shows that rogue GM plants occur in fields which were planted with GM oil seed rape 10 years earlier. Volunteer plants (plants that have not been planted deliberately) arise because some seed is spilled during harvest and remains in the field to germinate in a ...

  • UF/IFAS research may give new hope to expanding avocado production

    Findings from new University of Florida research may lead growers to produce avocados in the Indian River region of Florida, an area where the citrus industry has fallen on hard times. The research comes from a dissertation by Cristina Pisani, who recently completed her doctorate in horticultural sciences at the University of Florida Indian River Research and Education Center near Fort Pierce. ...

  • Late Corn Better Than Blighted Corn

    Growers whose corn crops were harmed by excessive rain in April and May likely will have enough growing days left in the season if they replant in the next two to three weeks, according to an Ohio State University agronomist. “If they replanted soon, it would probably be much better than to have a poor stand,” said Peter Thomison, an agronomist with Ohio State University Extension, ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Syngenta launches new biological seed treatment

    Syngenta today announced the launch of the EPIVIO brand family, a range of new biostimulants which address abiotic stresses through seed treatment. Over the last five years Syngenta has developed abiotic stress management testing capabilities to simulate drought, heat, cold and nutrient stresses. Seed treatment products resulting from this R&D platform are now commercialized under the ...


    By Syngenta

  • ARS scientists develop self-pollinating almond trees

    Self-pollinating almond trees that can produce a bountiful harvest without insect pollination are being developed by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists. This is good news for almond growers who face rising costs for insect pollination because of nationwide shortages of honey bees due to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and other factors. ARS geneticist Craig Ledbetter, at the agency’s ...

  • Greening China - Canadian trees takes root in China

    Ontario's official tree, the Eastern White Pine, has found a new home in China. It's one of several several tree species that Canadian companies like Maple Leaf Reforestation (MLR) and the Sino-Forest Corporation (SFC) are producing in China as part of a massive reforestation effort. China said in its most recent five-year plan that it aims to add 31-million acres of forest by 2015. In 2005, ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • A burning issue in winter wheat production

    Some Pacific Northwest winter wheat producers burn fields to remove straw left after harvest before reseeding. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and cooperators have shown that with careful management, this practice does not result in any more soil erosion than other postharvest practices. Continuous winter wheat cropping systems are used in some parts of the Pacific Northwest where ...

  • Rice paddies raise methane threat

    Directly seeding rice into fields rather than transplanting it into flooded paddies would dramatically reduce methane emissions and slow down climate change, according to scientists studying the staple crop. A number of experiments in Asia, particularly in the Philippines and Japan, show that a change in ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Free Webinar: Plotting a Strategy to Improve Germination, Plant Stands

    Anything you can do in your planting and seeding operation to improve seed germination and ensure maximum plant stands will make no-tilling less stressful and more successful. Through our exclusive No-Till Farmer webinar series, Reid Abbott, Field Agronomy Manager for Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers, will share findings from research studies conducted at the 750-acre North Central ...

  • Moringa Energy Project: Opportunities, Strategies and Priorities

    CJP hosts international sessions on Moringa oleifera Moringa oleifera is one of the worlds wonder crop, packed with nutrients in all its plant parts, especially in leaves, pods, flowers, seeds and roots are traditionally used by people to prevent many diseases. Moringa seed oil is popularly referred as ‘ben oil’ which has cosmetic and edible values and also used as high value ...


    By Advanced Biofuel Center

  • Scientists Develop Fast-Growing Sorghum for Biofuel

    COLLEGE STATION, Texas, October 9, 2007 (ENS) - American cars and trucks may soon be fueled with sorghum. Not used widely as a food grain in the United States, sorghum is one of the five top cereal crops in the world, along with wheat, oats, corn, and barley. It was cultivated in Egypt in ancient times, and Africa still is the largest producer of sorghum today. Now, energy crop ...

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