shellfish farming News

  • Taylor Shellfish First Farm in U.S. to Achieve Aquaculture Stewardship Council Certification

    The Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) announced that Taylor Shellfish Farms has become the first U.S. grower to achieve responsible aquaculture certification for a farming operation in Washington State. The Shelton, Wash. based company received ASC Bivalve Certification for its operation in the South Puget Sound basin, which comprises the Hood Canal and the area south of the Tacoma Narrows, ...


    By SCS Global Services

  • UK Shellfish are cleaner thanks to sewerage infrastructure improvements

    Shellfish harvesting areas in the UK are cleaner, thanks to sewerage improvement schemes over the last decade which have lowered average levels of Escherichia coli in oysters, mussels and other commercially-important species and boosted the shellfish industry’s economic value. Addressing the additional pollution risks from agriculture could further reduce contamination and human health ...

  • Fish farmed in the EU: a healthy, fresh and local alternative

    Ladies and Gentlemen, I will be brief… I can see many of you are eyeing up the delicious samples on offer here and this is precisely the purpose today: showcase our "EU farmed fish"! I am delighted to be here today to highlight the benefits of eating, fresh, locally produced fish. In other words, fish farmed here in the EU. When I say "fish", I mean of course both finfish and shellfish. I ...


    By Europa Press Room

  • Shifts in Mediterranean fish farming increase pressure on wild fish stocks

    Fish farming in the Mediterranean has increasingly shifted from producing fish such as grey mullet, which are herbivores near the bottom of the food chain, to species such as sea bass, which are predators. This ‘farming up’ the food chain requires wild fish to be caught to provide feed. A return to farming fish lower in the food chain would use marine resources more efficiently, a new ...

  • Cleaning up the baltic sea with mussel power

    Excess nutrients in seawater can cause eutrophication, a major environmental concern. Shellfish species such as mussels can 'soak up' some of these nutrients. A recent Swedish study examines the cost-effectiveness of mussel farming in the Baltic Sea as a method of reducing nutrient concentration and compares its potential with other methods of combating eutrophication. Eutrophication, caused by ...

  • Opportunities for aquaculture to be highlighted at Senate hearings

    Visiting senators could provide a great boost to the salmon farming business on Vancouver Island, agree the Campbell River Chamber of Commerce and BC Salmon Farmers Association. Members of the Senate Standing Committee for Fisheries and Oceans are visiting Tofino, Campbell River, Comox Valley and Nanaimo next week on a fact-finding tour. The committee is currently researching a study on the ...


    By Salmon Farmers Association

  • Freshwater Institute helps protect and restore healthy populations of Salmon

    “We have to keep finding new ways to increase the supply of healthy seafood,” said Joe Hankins, vice president at The Conservation Fund. “Because we continuously filter and clean the water in our tanks, our fish are healthy, and we’ve never had to use antibiotics, pesticides or other treatments to keep them that way. With the new water quality monitoring equipment and ...


    By YSI - a Xylem brand

  • Oyster imports bring alien ‘hitchhikers’ and disease

    The future of oyster farming in Europe is threatened by disease. However, a recent study highlights the risk of importing oysters to improve or replace lost stock, as this could accidentally bring further disease and invasive species. The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), originally from East Asia, has been the main species of oyster farmed in Europe since the early 20th century. Populations ...

  • Mangroves report reveals threats & opportunities to global economy & the planet

    The first global assessment of mangroves in over a decade reveals that rare and critically important mangrove forests continue to be lost at a rate three to four times higher than land-based global forests, despite positive restoration efforts by some countries. About one fifth of all mangroves are thought to have been lost since 1980. Although losses are slowing at 0.7 per cent a year, the ...

  • Disease threatens aquaculture in developing world

    Disease may challenge the ability of fish farming to feed the growing human population even as wild fish stocks decline and climate change hampers food production from other sources, a study shows. Aquaculture is ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Africa`s mollusc stocks at risk from ocean acidification

    Fishermen in Haiti and some African countries could lose their livelihoods as ocean acidification causes a decline in mollusc populations, a study has found. Human industrial activities release carbon dioxide, which dissolves in sea water, increasing its acidity. This higher acidity damages the mollusc stocks on ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Mangroves declining faster than forests

    The first global assessment of mangroves in over a decade reveals that rare and critically important mangrove forests continue to be lost at a rate three to four times higher than land-based global forests, despite positive restoration efforts by some countries. About one fifth of all mangroves are thought to have been lost since 1980. Although losses are slowing at 0.7% a year, the authors warn ...

  • 20% of world’s mangrove areas destroyed since 1980

    Environmental and economic damages caused by the alarming loss of mangroves in many countries should be urgently addressed FAO said today, calling for better mangrove protection and management programmes. The world has lost around 3.6 million hectares (ha) of mangroves since 1980, equivalent to an alarming 20 percent loss of total mangrove area according to FAO’s recent mangrove assessment ...

  • Fertilizer run-off killing Gulf of Mexico marine life

    Improved management of crops and perennials could go a long way toward alleviating the problem of hypoxia, which claims thousands of fish, shrimp and shellfish in the Gulf of Mexico each spring. An assessment by a team led by Virginia Dale of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Environmental Sciences Division concludes that low oxygen levels in water, or hypoxia, causes problems throughout the ...

  • World`s most comprehensive assessment of mangroves reveals threats & opportunities to global economy & the planet

    The first global assessment of mangroves in over a decade reveals that rare and critically important mangrove forests continue to be lost at a rate three to four times higher than land-based global forests, despite positive restoration efforts by some countries. About one fifth of all mangroves are thought to have been lost since 1980. Although losses are slowing at 0.7 per cent a year, the ...

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