soil fertility analysis News

  • SGS Soil Fertility Services now available in Canada

    This year SGS Canada, in conjunction with SGS Mid-West Seed Services in Brookings, SD (USA), has started work with large fertilizer dealers in Western Canada.  SGS is offering custom GPS (Global Positioning System) soil sampling and analysis for more than one million acres of farm ground within Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.  Through SGS Crop Services, these retailers are able to ...


    By SGS

  • Quality Organic Fertilizers & Soil Amendments at an Affordable Price

    Our health starts with our soil. If the soil in our farms and gardens is depleted of life because of chemical and fertilization, the food will be sterile and not healthy. They key to a healthy body, soul, and mind is organically grown food that is full of life. “When the things we put into our bodies are healthy, our bodies are able to utilize the nutrients with very little energy. This ...


    By Vermitechnology Unlimited

  • Research to restore the fertility of earth`s soils

    In keynote addresses at the FAO Workshop on Sustainable Agriculture in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on April 28 and April 29, 2009, soil fertility experts from the Nutrition Security Institute, (NSI) a non-profit organization located in Bellevue, Washington, presented advances and understandings in biotic soil fertility as a proven solution to the serious problems facing global agriculture. Their dual ...

  • The Importance of Soil Sampling – Liquid Fertiliser Tanks Store Fertilizer Efficiently

    The importance of soil sampling was reinforced by Farming Life this week. It stated that good productive soils are the foundation of any successful farm system and that the ability of soils to supply nutrients at a time and in an appropriate quantity for grass and crop can be key to determining productivity. Therefore, a farms ability to manage soil fertility levels should be a primary objective. ...


    By ENDURAMAXX Storage Tanks

  • Measuring calcium in serpentine soils

    Serpentine soils contain highly variable amounts of calcium, making them marginal lands for farming. Successful management of serpentine soils requires accurate measurement of the calcium they hold. Research published this month in the Soil Science Society of America Journal shows that multiple measurement techniques are needed to accurately measure calcium content in serpentine soils. To make ...

  • Ohio State Agronomy Workshop Jan. 19 to Focus on Soil Fertility

    Healthy soils are a key ingredient to produce strong crop yields, and understanding what nutrients your soils need is a fundamental step in that process, says an educator in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. Soil fertility is crucial to maximizing yield potential when growing crops, said Amanda Douridas, an Ohio State University Extension ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Fertilization regimen reduces environmental impact of landscape palms

    Palms are an important part of the environment in subtropical and warm temperate climates. Palms' aesthetics and small "footprints" make them desirable in a variety of landscapes throughout the southeastern United States. Unfortunately, palms also have some of the highest nutrient requirements of any plants. Timothy Broschat, a scientist from the University of Florida's Fort Lauderdale Research ...

  • Writing an equation for soil success

    Soil isn’t one size fits all. It may look the same under your feet – but under a microscope, that’s a different story. A plant’s roots, tiny bugs – these things can tell one soil from another quite easily. Soil scientists typically measure different aspects of soil — how much air it contains, how well it retains water, heat, and more — to ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Improved soil water sensors aid in irrigation management

    Agriculture, a large user of water for irrigation, is under pressure to reduce water use. Increased urban population growth has created more competition for limited water supplies. While growers have used soil moisture probes to aid in irrigation management in the past, earlier probes required maintenance or were expensive or inadequate.  New electronic sensors have been developed that require ...

  • Past, present and future of soil sciences

    The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) is reporting the results of a recent survey of trends related to the soil science profession. The results suggest that employment opportunities in soil and related sciences are increasing, and students, academics, and employers have a positive outlook for the future of soil science. Despite these positive findings, the survey identified areas to be ...

  • Method developed to measure solute movement in soils

    Scientists from Aarhus University and Aalborg University in Denmark have developed a new method for measuring the movement of solutes in intact soil. Improving on the existing method, the new procedure can be used on intact, undisturbed soil and provides more confident estimates. Movement, or diffusion, of solutes in soils is involved in many processes of agronomical, environmental and technical ...

  • When it comes to forest soil, wildfires pack one-two punch

    For decades, scientists and resource managers have known that wildfires affect forest soils, evidenced, in part, by the erosion that often occurs after a fire kills vegetation and disrupts soil structure. But, the lack of detailed knowledge of forest soils before they are burned by wildfire has hampered efforts to understand fire’s effects on soil fertility and forest ecology. New research ...

  • Nitrogen mysteries in urban grasslands

    Areas of turf-forming species created and maintained by humans for aesthetic and recreational (not grazing) purposes, i.e. “urban grasslands” are an extremely common, but poorly studied ecosystem type. There are over 150,000 km2of urban grasslands in the U.S. and many receive high rates of fertilizer, creating concerns about nutrient runoff to streams, lakes, and estuaries and emissions of ...

  • Argus FMB Africa Fertilizer 2016: Your super early bird rate ends next Friday

    If you are looking to grow your business in Africa and hear the latest analysis of consumption trends, Argus FMB Africa Fertilizer is the best place to meet key decision makers. You can network with international market players including delegates ...


    By Argus Media Ltd.

  • A little nitrogen can go a long way

    Varying the rate of crop production inputs such as fertilizer and seed makes intuitive sense, as farmers have long observed differences in crop yield in various areas of a single field. The availability of spatial yield information from combines equipped with yield monitors has provided a good resource for improved management. So, optimizing inputs to match yield potential of different areas ...

  • Cover Crops Capture Nutrients to the Benefit of Farmers and Water Quality

    Many factors contribute to the excess phosphorous that stimulates algal systems in bodies of water such as Lake Erie. Sources of excess phosphorous include urban stormwater, factories, sewers, household wastes and lawn fertilizer, and in some areas runoff from fertilizers or manure applied to fields. Fortunately, many farmers are already doing their part to improve water. ...

  • Life cycle study demonstrates the long-term costs of everyday crops

    The environmental and economic costs of a selection of common crops have been determined by a new study, which hopes to improve agricultural sustainability assessments in Europe. The researchers used life cycle analysis on organically farmed tomatoes and pears, and intensively farmed wheat, apples, and lettuce to show the overall impact of agricultural methods. Agriculture accounts for 45% of ...

  • Bringing nitrogen out to pasture

    Cows in Brazil might start bellowing "leguuume" rather than "moo." That's because Jose Dubeux Jr. wants to plant more legume trees in cow pastures. Dubeux is an assistant professor of Agronomy at North Florida Research & Education Center. Growing up, Dubeux spent a lot of time on his grandparents' farm in Brazil. There he developed a passion for livestock operations and the grasslands on ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Tillage and reduced-input rotations affect runoff from agricultural fields

    A new study from researchers at the USDA Agricultural Research Service provides information about runoff under different management practices and can help farmers choose the practice that is best for them. No-till management practices can reduce soil erosion, but evidence suggests they can also lead to increased runoff of dissolved phosphorus from soil surfaces. Meanwhile, farmers looking ...

  • Race is on to feed warming world

    It can take up to 30 years to improve a crop variety, test it and persuade farmers to adopt it. That means the speed of climate change in Africa could make a new variety of maize useless even before the first harvest, according to new research. But two separate studies that address the challenge of food security in a rapidly ...


    By Climate News Network

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you