soil fertility indication News

  • Fertilization regimen reduces environmental impact of landscape palms

    Palms are an important part of the environment in subtropical and warm temperate climates. Palms' aesthetics and small "footprints" make them desirable in a variety of landscapes throughout the southeastern United States. Unfortunately, palms also have some of the highest nutrient requirements of any plants. Timothy Broschat, a scientist from the University of Florida's Fort Lauderdale Research ...

  • Soil and crop management and carbon sequestration

    Research results from management scenarios ranging from those in the South Eastern, Great Plains, and Upper Midwest regions of the US and from Italy are reported in the March-April, 2010 issue of the Soil Science Society America Journal. This group of papers originated from the Soil Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Symposium that was held jointly by the Soil Science Society of ...

  • Soil phosphorus in an organic cropping system

    Phosphorus is a nonrenewable resource, raising concerns that agricultural practices may deplete reserves. (For one overview discussion of phosphorus, see Phosphorus Famine: The Threat to Our Food Supply in the June 2009 Scientific American.) Organic farming with low phosphorus  inputs can result in deficient levels of plant-available phosphorus (available-P).A group of researchers from ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Antibiotic-eating bug unearthed in soil

    It’s well known how bacteria exposed to antibiotics for long periods will find ways to resist the drugs—by quickly pumping them out of their cells, for instance, or modifying the compounds so they’re no longer toxic. Now new research has uncovered another possible mechanism of antibiotic “resistance” in soil. In a paper publishing this week in the Journal of ...

  • Fertilizer and plastic pollution are main emerging issues in 2011 unep year book

    Fertilizer and plastic pollution are main emerging issues in 2011 unep year book Massive amounts of phosphorus, a valuable fertilizer needed to feed a growing global population, are being lost to the oceans as result of inefficiencies in farming and a failure to recycle wastewater. Phosphorus pollution, along with other uncontrolled discharges, such as nitrogen and sewage, are linked with a rise ...

  • Through microbes, nitrogen alters soil carbon cycle

    Soil scientists studying bacterial communities in hardwood forests have found evidence that extra human-derived nitrogen deposited from the atmosphere can change the composition of the soil microbial community, with implications for carbon cycling and sequestration. Don Zak and Sarah Eisenlord from the University of Michigan conducted a study on the response the soil bacterial community to levels ...

  • Producing strawberries in high-pH soil at high elevations

    Fruit and vegetable production in high-elevation areas can be a difficult enterprise. Variable weather and soil conditions typical of these regions, such as the southwestern United States, present multiple challenges for growers. "High frequency and intensity of late spring frosts in semiarid climates have made fruit production challenging," explained Shengrui Yao, corresponding author of a study ...

  • Effects of chemical fertiliser and animal manure on soil health compared

    Fertilising crops with cattle manure can lead to better soil quality than when synthetic fertiliser is used, recent research indicates. The use of cattle manure in the study led to greater soil fertility by encouraging higher microbial activity, and the researchers suggest that it could potentially improve soil’s ability to cope with periods of difficult growing conditions. The ...

  • Ultra-fine coatings on sediment grains influence nitrate and sulfate storage in soil

    Tiny sediment grains are covered with a very fine-grained, complex mixture of minerals in an open fabric that results in a large surface area in contact with water between the grains. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are studying this microscopic layer and finding that the mineral composition of these coatings on sediment grains in the unsaturated zone (i.e., between land surface ...

  • New tool calculates impact of bioenergy crops on soil quality

    Today Alterra and CLM, supported by Netherlands Enterprise Agency, jointly launched the tool BioESoil that allows farmers and advisors to assess the impacts of bioenergy production on soil quality. With a worldwide rising demand for biomass, uncontrolled production may cause a serious deterioration of soil quality. However, so far no methodology existed to assess the impact of biomass production ...

  • Increasing diversity through crop rotation boosts soil microbial biodiversity and productivity

    Planting a variety of crop species in rotation in agricultural fields increases the diversity of soil microbes below ground, recent research has found. This in turn positively affects soil organic matter, soil structure and aids the healthy functioning of the soil. The researchers say that rotational diversity can help farmers to grow crops in a more sustainable way that promotes soil stability. ...

  • Analyzing long-term impacts of biofuel on the land

    The growing development and implementation of renewable biofuel energy has considerable advantages over using declining supplies of fossil fuels. However, meeting the demands of a fuel-driven society may require utilizing all biofuel sources including agricultural crop residues. While a useful biofuel source, crop residues also play a crucial role in maintaining soil organic carbon stock. This ...

  • Nitrogen use by warm-season grasses for biomass production

    Perennial, warm-season grasses are being evaluated as potential renewable energy crops. These species are well-suited for the production of biomass for energy applications because they utilize C4 photosynthesis and are perennial. Grasses that employ the C4 photosynthetic pathway use water, nitrogen (N), and solar radiation more efficiently than plants having the C3 pathway, and therefore are ...

  • Finding the real potential of no-till farming for sequestering carbon

    The potential of no-tillage (NT) soils for increasing the soil organic carbon (SOC) pool must be critically and objectively assessed. Most of the previous studies about SOC accrual in NT soils have primarily focused on the surface layer (<20-cm soil depth), and not for the whole soil profile. The lack of adequate data on the SOC profile is a hindrance to conclusively ascertain the effects of ...

  • The Public University of Navarre is participating in a European project on sustainable management and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in irrigation farming

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere is used by plants to build their tissues, and when plants die, the carbon can reach the soil in which they grow. If the way of cultivating the earth can be optimized to prevent some of this carbon from returning to the atmosphere in the form of CO2, it will be contributing towards cutting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, one of the main causes of global ...

  • USSEC Provides Trade and Technical Servicing to Shrimp Producers in Peru

    USSEC provided technical support to commercial shrimp growers in Peru by holding multiple discussions with a feedmill representative and fish and shrimp producers about modifying diet formulations for fish and shrimp by incorporating more soybean meal derived from U.S.-grown soybeans. Visits to fish and shrimp farms and facilities by USSEC consultants Dr. John Hargreaves and Jairo Amezquita ...

  • A little nitrogen can go a long way

    Varying the rate of crop production inputs such as fertilizer and seed makes intuitive sense, as farmers have long observed differences in crop yield in various areas of a single field. The availability of spatial yield information from combines equipped with yield monitors has provided a good resource for improved management. So, optimizing inputs to match yield potential of different areas ...

  • Conventional, compost, organic production compared for strawberry

    A team of researchers from North Carolina State University set out to provide strawberry growers in their region with information that could help them transition to more sustainable soil and pest management production practices. Their study, published in the August 2015 issue of HortTechnology, compared conventional, compost, and organic strawberry production systems in the southeastern United ...

  • Nutrient Management Plans: A Study in Cause and Effect

    It seems practical on the surface. Nutrient management plans (NMPs) should supply plants with ideal amounts of nutrients, minimize runoff, and maintain or even improve the soil condition. And the farmer behind the plan would work with a set of conservation practices designed to reduce harmful pollutants while still obtaining optimal crop yields. However, many U.S. Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs) ...

  • Ancient farming method may help conserve savannahs

    A fire-free farming method practiced by early inhabitants of the Amazonian savannahs could help inform efforts to conserve and rehabilitate these important ecosystems around the world, a study has found. The research provides greater historic context for findings presented at a conference earlier this year (26 January), which suggested that slash-and-burn — in which trees are felled, left ...


    By SciDev.Net

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