sustainable soil fertility product News

  • Veolia Awarded Operations Contract for North Carolina Biomass Facility

    Through a new $9 million annual operations and maintenance (O&M) contract with North Carolina Renewable Power – Lumberton, LLC, a subsidiary of Georgia Renewable Power (GRP), Veolia Energy Operating Services, LLC (Veolia) will manage a cogeneration plant that converts poultry litter (waste) and wood chips into biomass energy – diverting up to ...


    By Veolia

  • Research to restore the fertility of earth`s soils

    In keynote addresses at the FAO Workshop on Sustainable Agriculture in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on April 28 and April 29, 2009, soil fertility experts from the Nutrition Security Institute, (NSI) a non-profit organization located in Bellevue, Washington, presented advances and understandings in biotic soil fertility as a proven solution to the serious problems facing global agriculture. Their dual ...

  • Secret to Healthy Soil, Black Worm Castings, Organic Fertilizers, Vermaplex

    Although it is not apparent, the soil in your garden or farm is living system teaming with life. The ‘soil food web’, is made up of millions of beneficial micro-organisms which supports the development, vigor and production of the plant. These organisms include, nematodes, fungi, protozoa, and bacteria, are also responsible for retaining water and nutrients and disease ...


    By Vermitechnology Unlimited

  • Food security depends on sustainable nutrient management of soils

    Food security is being threatened by loss of soil nutrients that are essential for the high yield of crops. A recent study outlines strategies to ensure the sustainable production of food through a holistic approach to soil nutrient management. In response to the rising demand for food from an increasing world population, high-yielding crops are being grown with the help of artificial fertilisers ...

  • Soil organisms aid crop productivity by increasing yields

    Soil-living bacteria and fungi can be used to boost crop yields by more than 50 per cent without the use of fertilizers, an international research project has found. In combination with fertilizers, yields of key crops such as beans, can more than double, the scientists from seven countries discovered. The findings, the result of an international effort to unravel the mysteries of so-called ...

  • Fertilizer Use to Surpass 200 Million Tonnes in 2018

    Global fertilizer use is likely to rise above 200.5 million tonnes in 2018, 25 percent higher than recorded in 2008. World fertilizer consumption will grow by 1.8 percent a year through 2018, according to FAO's new report "World fertilizer trends and outlook to 2018." At the same time "the global capacity of fertilizer products, intermediates and raw materials will increase further," the report ...

  • World Soil Day hails symbiotic role of pulses to boost sustainable agriculture

    Soil and pulses can make major contributions to the challenge of feeding the world's growing population and combating climate change, especially when deployed together, according to Soils and Pulses: Symbiosis for Life, a new report by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization released on  ...

  • Increasing diversity through crop rotation boosts soil microbial biodiversity and productivity

    Planting a variety of crop species in rotation in agricultural fields increases the diversity of soil microbes below ground, recent research has found. This in turn positively affects soil organic matter, soil structure and aids the healthy functioning of the soil. The researchers say that rotational diversity can help farmers to grow crops in a more sustainable way that promotes soil stability. ...

  • Writing an equation for soil success

    Soil isn’t one size fits all. It may look the same under your feet – but under a microscope, that’s a different story. A plant’s roots, tiny bugs – these things can tell one soil from another quite easily. Soil scientists typically measure different aspects of soil — how much air it contains, how well it retains water, heat, and more — to ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Fertilizer and plastic pollution are main emerging issues in 2011 unep year book

    Fertilizer and plastic pollution are main emerging issues in 2011 unep year book Massive amounts of phosphorus, a valuable fertilizer needed to feed a growing global population, are being lost to the oceans as result of inefficiencies in farming and a failure to recycle wastewater. Phosphorus pollution, along with other uncontrolled discharges, such as nitrogen and sewage, are linked with a rise ...

  • Past, present and future of soil sciences

    The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) is reporting the results of a recent survey of trends related to the soil science profession. The results suggest that employment opportunities in soil and related sciences are increasing, and students, academics, and employers have a positive outlook for the future of soil science. Despite these positive findings, the survey identified areas to be ...

  • Business commits to UNCCD capacity building for soil leadership

    UNCCD today launched a Soil Leadership Academy with support from the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) and leading WBCSD member Syngenta and called on other business and stakeholders to join. The main goal of the joint initiative is to fill the gap in capacity building opportunities for policy makers to address land management issues, through distilling and sharing the ...


    By Syngenta

  • Preserve, promote, and utilise rich soil life

    Healthy soil life can contribute to sustainable agriculture which, in addition to ensuring a good yield, keeps diseases under control and generates carbon and nitrogen retention. That is what Prof. Gerlinde De Deyn, Professor holding a personal chair in Soil Ecology, asserted in her inaugural address at Wageningen University & Research on 18 May. Life underground is richer in species than ...

  • Improved soil water sensors aid in irrigation management

    Agriculture, a large user of water for irrigation, is under pressure to reduce water use. Increased urban population growth has created more competition for limited water supplies. While growers have used soil moisture probes to aid in irrigation management in the past, earlier probes required maintenance or were expensive or inadequate.  New electronic sensors have been developed that require ...

  • Maryland, Michigan Farmers Keep Soil, Environment Healthy

    As farming practices increasingly attract interest from the general public, two farmers are ensuring they meet public approval. They use proven management practices that focus on improving soil quality and maintaining a quality natural environment. In fact, getting the right nutrients to where they belong and in the right amounts when they’re needed enables them to improve yields while ...

  • Glomalin is key to locking up soil carbon

    A soil constituent known as glomalin provides a secure vault for the world's soil carbon. That’s according to Kristine Nichols, a microbiologist at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Northern Great Plains Research Laboratory in Mandan, N.D. Glomalin is a sticky substance secreted by threadlike fungal structures called hyphae that funnel nutrients and water to plant roots. Glomalin acts like ...

  • Scientists to map out earth`s soil

    Some of the answers to the world’s greatest challenges -- such as climate change, food security, and water scarcity -- lie right beneath our feet. Responding to these and other critical issues, a group of scientists from around the world have announced an ambitious new plan to digitally map the Earth’s soil and its properties. Scientists, industry leaders, and government officials gathered ...

  • FAO launches new global soil database

    A new database on the world’s soils improves knowledge of the current and future land productivity as well as the present carbon storage and carbon sequestration potential of the world’s soils. It helps to identify land and water limitations, and assist in assessing the risks of land degradation, particularly soil erosion risks, said FAO this week. Derived from the soil database, FAO has produced ...

  • Crop residues provide valuable protection for soil

    Removing wheat and sorghum crop residue after harvest, such as stalks, stubble and leaves, may cause more harm than good according to new research. Results indicate that removing residue can increase nutrient and sediment levels in water runoff, and decrease organic carbon stored in the soil. Crop residue left after harvest performs several ecosystem services. In particular it protects the soil ...

  • Is biomass production profitable?

    Cellulosic ethanol has emerged as a leading candidate biofuel that could contribute significantly to meeting U.S. liquid fuel demand while reducing net greenhouse gas emissions. Feasibility of large-scale cellulosic ethanol production depends not only on the development of cost effective processing methods, but also on the availability of large quantities of cellulosic biomass for conversion to ...

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