turfgrass News

  • Turfgrass that wears down and springs back up

    Kentucky bluegrass, a turfgrass frequently grown on sports fields, is more tolerant to wear during the spring compared to other seasons, and shows better recovery during spring, according to research from Rutgers University. The study also identified which varieties of bluegrass showed the most wear tolerance. Researchers Bradley Park, T.J. Lawson, Hiranthi Samaranayake, and James A. Murphy, from ...

  • Nitrogen in reclaimed water can benefit turfgrass

    As competition for fresh water increases and fertilizer prices rise, the horticulture industry is looking to reclaimed wastewater as a valuable resource for supplying irrigation and necessary nutrients for urban landscapes. In the U.S., Florida is a leading user of recycled water; more than 50% of the state's reclaimed water is being put to use for irrigation of recreational areas such as golf ...

  • Improving Soil for Better Lawns and Gardens

    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists in West Virginia are finding ways to improve soil on degraded land so it can be used for sports fields and other uses. Researchers with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) at the agency's Appalachian Farming Systems Research Center (AFSRC) in Beaver, W.Va., are developing constructed or replacement subsoils and topsoils to build better and ...

  • The Grass Is Always Greener on YOUR Side

    NaturesFinestSeed, a division of Granite Seed Company, announced today it is now making its high-end grass, wildflower and habitat seed available to the general public. It had previously been available only to high-end commercial and government buyers for high visibility projects like golf courses and luxury developments. NaturesFinestSeed produces a large number of high-purity grass seed, ...


    By Marketwire

  • Agrium Advanced Technologies Making Colorado State University Greener

    Agrium Advanced Technologies (AAT) and Colorado State University (CSU) today announced the use of environmentally responsible, slow- and controlled-release fertilizers at CSU’s main campus in Fort Collins as part of both organizations’ ongoing collaboration and commitment to sustainability initiatives. AAT donated a variety of its slow- and controlled-release ...


    By PRWeb

  • Direct Solutions Adds Two to Agronomy Team

    Direct Solutions today announced the addition of Brandon Green and Bob Raley to the green industry distributor’s Turf & Horticulture agronomy team. “Building a solution-oriented agronomy team is one of our most important jobs,” said David Gingrich, Managing Director of Direct Solutions. “The addition of Brandon and Bob to our team of talented agronomists gives us two valuable resources to ...


    By PRWeb

  • Crop Science Society of America Presents Awards in Long Beach

    The Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) will recognize the following individuals at the 2010 Awards Ceremony on Oct. 31-Nov. 3 during their Annual Meetings in Long Beach, CA, www.acsmeetings.org. The annual awards are presented for outstanding contributions to crop science through education, national and international service, and research. ...

  • Soil and crop management and carbon sequestration

    Research results from management scenarios ranging from those in the South Eastern, Great Plains, and Upper Midwest regions of the US and from Italy are reported in the March-April, 2010 issue of the Soil Science Society America Journal. This group of papers originated from the Soil Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Symposium that was held jointly by the Soil Science Society of ...

  • Nitrogen fertilizers` impact on lawn soils

    Nitrogen fertilizers from farm fields often end up in aquatic ecosystems, resulting in water quality problems, such as toxic algae and underwater ‘dead zones’. There are concerns that fertilizers used on lawns may also contribute to these problems. All of the lawns in the United States cover an area almost as large as Florida, making turfgrass our largest ‘crop’ and lawn ...

  • American society of agronomy presents 2011 class of fellows

    The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) will recognize the following individuals at the 2011 Awards Ceremony during their Annual Meeting on Oct. 16-19 in San Antonio, TX, www.acsmeetings.org. ASA has been selecting outstanding members as Fellows since 1924. Members of the Society nominate worthy colleagues based on their professional achievements ...

  • Fertilization regimen reduces environmental impact of landscape palms

    Palms are an important part of the environment in subtropical and warm temperate climates. Palms' aesthetics and small "footprints" make them desirable in a variety of landscapes throughout the southeastern United States. Unfortunately, palms also have some of the highest nutrient requirements of any plants. Timothy Broschat, a scientist from the University of Florida's Fort Lauderdale Research ...

  • Using genetic mapping to save wheat production

    Stem rust disease has the potential to devastate wheat production worldwide. In the 1950s, large epidemics spread across North America and through other parts of the world. Developing a stem rust resistant gene stopped the spread of the disease. In 1999, a new race of stem rust was discovered in Uganda and identified as Ug99. Previously developed stem rust resistant genes are no longer effective ...

  • Nitrogen mysteries in urban grasslands

    Areas of turf-forming species created and maintained by humans for aesthetic and recreational (not grazing) purposes, i.e. “urban grasslands” are an extremely common, but poorly studied ecosystem type. There are over 150,000 km2of urban grasslands in the U.S. and many receive high rates of fertilizer, creating concerns about nutrient runoff to streams, lakes, and estuaries and emissions of ...

  • Drought Tolerant rice in development

    Rice production faces the threat of a growing worldwide water scarcity. Approximately, 75% of the world’s rice is grown in flooded, lowland conditions. Lowland rice crops either rely on irrigation or rain water to provide adequate growing conditions. The food security of millions of people depends on the availability of water.   Scientists at the International Rice Research Institute ...

  • Crop breeding gets boost from sweet potatoes

    In Uganda, the sweet potato is a major staple crop. Behind China and Nigeria, Uganda produces the most sweet potatoes in the world. Nationwide, families grow the crop to feed themselves, their livestock and to use as a source of income. Small scale agricultural operations use a large number of sweet potato varieties in their planting. These varieties are steadily being lost due to weevils, sweet ...

  • Genetics not enough to increase wheat production

    The deep gene pool that has allowed wheat to achieve ever increasing gains in yield may be draining. Crop scientists estimate that 50% of the gain in wheat production over the past century has been due to breeding. According to a new study, however, that improvement has been slowing since the late 1980s, with little chance that future increases in yield can be met by breeding efforts alone. The ...

  • Method to differentiate open pollinated varieties of maize developed

    Open pollinated varieties of maize are going to be easier to distinguish from each other, thanks to scientists at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) in Africa and Mexico. They have developed a new technique to differentiate the genes of one open pollinated variety from another, particularly important to African farmers, most of whom do not plant hybrid varieties. The ...

  • 2009 ASA–CSSA–SSSA meetings emphasize sustainability

    The 2009 ASA–CSSA–SSSA International Annual Meetings are just around the corner, 1–5 November in Pittsburgh, PA. The theme of the meetings, “Footprints in the Landscape: Sustainability through Plant and Soil Sciences,” together with the location, emphasize sustainability. The meeting theme runs throughout the technical program that is built around daily plenary sessions, nine distinguished ...

  • Scientists find four-leaf clover gene

    Ending a period of “bad luck” for clover researchers, scientists report finding the gene that turns ordinary three-leaf clovers into the coveted four-leaf types. Masked by the three-leaf gene and strongly influenced by environmental condition, molecular markers now make it possible to detect the presence of the gene for four-leaves and for breeders to work with it. The results of the ...

  • Increasing the shelf-life of cassava

    Crop scientists have identified several genetic mechanisms to improving the shelf-life of cassava roots. Long an unsolvable problem, the research has the potential to benefit the poorest of the poor, widening and strengthening the markets for cassava, reducing marketing costs, and losses along the marketing or value addition process. The research team, led by Hernán Ceballos at the ...

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