John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Insecticide residues in Australian plague locusts (Chortoicetes terminifera Walker) after ultra‐low volume aerial application of the organophosphorus insecticide, fenitrothion

0
The need for locust control throughout eastern Australia during the spring of 2010 provided an opportunity to quantify residues of the organophosphorus insecticide, fenitrothion, on nymphs of the Australian plague locust, Chortoicetes terminifera Walker. Residues were collected across the different physiological states of locust nymphs observed following exposure to fenitrothion, namely live, dead and debilitated (characterised by ease of capture, erratic hopping and the inability to remain upright). The time course of residue depletion for 72 h after spraying is quantified and residue per unit dose (RUD) values in the present study are compared with previous research. Fenitrothion RUD values ranged from 0.2 to 31.2 (mean = 6.3 ± 1.3, SE) µg/g in live, from 0.5 to 25.5 (7.8 ± 1.3) µg/g in debilitated and from 2.3 to 39.8 (16.5 ± 2.8) µg/g in dead C. terminifera nymphs. Residues of the oxidative derivative of fenitrothion, fenitrooxon, were generally below the limit of quantitation for the analysis (0.02 µg/g) with two exceptions, one live and one debilitated sample returning residues at the limit of quantitation. Our data suggest that sampling of acridids for risk assessment should include mimicking predatory behaviour and be over a longer time course (preferably 3–24 h post spray) than sampling of vegetation (typically 1–2 h post spray) and that current regulatory frameworks may underestimate the risk of pesticides applied for locust or grasshopper control. Environ Toxicol Chem © 2013 SETAC

Customer comments

No comments were found for Insecticide residues in Australian plague locusts (Chortoicetes terminifera Walker) after ultra‐low volume aerial application of the organophosphorus insecticide, fenitrothion. Be the first to comment!