Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from livestock production

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Cattle are a major source of non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions: methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and ammonia (NH3). This collection reviews the range of research on ways of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from livestock production. Part 1 reviews the genetics, measurement and modelling of methane emissions from cattle. Chapters cover what we know about rumen function and genetics in relation to methane emissions, ways of measuring and modelling emissions. Part 2 reviews the contribution of breeding, housing and husbandry practices including manure management. Part 3 assesses nutritional approaches to reducing emissions, from forage and silage to feed supplements such as plant bioactive compounds and direct-fed microbials as well as inhibitors and vaccines to modify the rumen environment.

Launch:
Sep. 2020

Details

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part 1: Analysis

1. Understanding rumen genetics and its implications for reducing methane emissions from cattle

Rainer Roehe

2. Measuring methane emissions from livestock

Deli Chen

3. Modelling methane emissions from livestock

Laurence Shalloo

Part 2: Breeding, animal husbandry and manure management

4. Improving selection for low methane-emitting livestock breeds

Yvette de Haas

5. Improving livestock housing and management to minimise greenhouse gas emissions

F.-X Philippe

6. The contribution of animal health to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from livestock

Ilias Kyriazakis

7. Improving livestock manure collection, storage and separation

Barbara Amon

8. Developments in anaerobic digestion to optimise use of livestock manure

Yongzhong Feng

Part 3: Nutrition

9. The impact of improving feed efficiency on the environmental impact of livestock production:

James Drackley

10. Improving grassland/forage quality and management to reduce livestock greenhouse gas

emissions

Michael O`Donovan

11. The use of feed supplements to reduce livestock greenhouse gas emissions: plant bioactive compounds

Cecile Martin

12. The use of feed supplements to reduce livestock greenhouse gas emissions: direct-fed microbials

Catherine Stanton

13. Modifying the rumen environment to reduce livestock greenhouse gas emissions

Tim McAllister

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