crop water Articles

  • From electronic noses to invasive bees, 15 surprising trends for 2017

    What should we be thinking about when we think about the future of biodiversity, conservation and the environment? An international team of experts in horizon scanning, science communication and conservation recently asked that question as participants in the eighth annual Horizon Scan of Emerging Issues for ...


    By Ensia

  • 3 Great Ways to Use Your Farm Drone During the Off-Season

    You may have finished up your 2016 harvest, or perhaps getting a jump start on planning for the 2017 growing season, but think twice before putting away your farm drone for the winter. Just because you’re not actively working in the field does not mean your quad-copter shouldn’t play an active role in your off-season operations. Here are some great ways you can use your farm ...


    By Sentera, LLC

  • Changing climate changes soils

    Varied predictions for soil organic matter as climate changes The hottest months. The snowiest winters. Catastrophic floods and droughts. Climate change impacts lives across the world in drastic and unpredictable ways. This unpredictability also extends to the more subtle – yet still important – effects of climate change. For example, it is ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Crops flourish with Scalewatcher

    Water is an essential component of horticulture and agriculture whether it is used for irrigating field-scale vegetables, nursery stock, flowers or fruit.  Where water contains high degrees of calcium, magnesium and sodium, it can cause nutrient deficiency in plants and crops resulting in stunted growth and poor yields. Calcium also blocks irrigation systems and boilers in heated ...

  • Cultivating energy crop production

    A NEW Farm Bill is moving through the Congressional legislative process. Along the way, commercial agriculture is debating the energy impacts of future corn and soybean production. The growth of corn-based ethanol and soybean-based biodiesel has created competition for the feed inputs into animal agriculture, namely corn and soybeans. While most of agriculture discusses energy production from ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Water Quality, Soil and Managing Irrigation of Crops

    The book entitled Water Quality, Soil and Managing Irrigation of Crops comprises three sections, specifically: Reuse Water Quality, Soil and Pollution which comprises five technical chapters, Managing Irrigation of Crops with four, and Examples of Irrigation Systems three technical chapters, all presented by the respective authors in their own fields of expertise. This text should be of interest ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Emissions from Crops - POST Note

    Agriculture contributes 9% of the UK’s greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions burden and 10-12% globally. Although there is a long-term declining trend from UK agriculture, the sector may account for a larger share of overall emissions in the future as other sectors reduce emissions. This POSTnote focuses on reducing GHG emissions from growing and storing arable and horticultural crops. ...


    By UK Parliament

  • Commercial greenhouse water demand sensitivity analysis: single crop case study

    Today water distribution utilities are trying to improve operational efficiency through increased demand intelligence from their largest customers. Moving to prognostic operations allows utilities to optimally schedule and scale resources to meet demand more reliably and economically. Commercial greenhouses are large water consumers. In order to produce effective forecasting models for ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Can water use efficiency be modeled well enough to impact crop management?

    Crop water use efficiency (WUE, yield per unit of water use) is key for agricultural production with limited water resources. Policymakers and water resource managers working at all scales need to address the multitudinous scenarios in which cropping systems and amounts, timing and methods of irrigation, and fertilizer applications may be changed to improve WUE while meeting yield and harvest ...

  • Aquacrop—the FAO crop model to simulate yield response to water

    This article introduces the FAO crop model AquaCrop. It simulates attainable yields of major herbaceous crops as a function of water consumption under rainfed, supplemental, deficit, and full irrigation conditions. The growth engine of AquaCrop is water-driven, in that transpiration is calculated first and translated into biomass using a conservative, crop-specific parameter: the biomass water ...

  • Modeling Nitrogen and water management effects in a Wheat-Maize double-cropping system

    Excessive N and water use in agriculture causes environmental degradation and can potentially jeopardize the sustainability of the system. A field study was conducted from 2000 to 2002 to study the effects of four N treatments (0, 100, 200, and 300 kg N ha–1 per crop) on a wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) double cropping system under 70 ± 15% field capacity in the North China ...

  • Can genetic engineering help quench crops’ thirst?

    Researchers around the world are exploring how GMO technology might boost food production under hot, dry conditions. Roger Deal is trying to figure out how plants remember drought. An assistant professor of biochemistry and genetics at Emory University, Deal says most plants have a kind of memory for stress. When experiencing water shortage, for example, plants close ...


    By Ensia

  • Cheap chemicals entice caterpillar-eating wasps to crops

    It may be a win-win situation: treating seeds with commercially available growth promoters before planting could have the added benefit of attracting parasitic wasps that feed on caterpillar pests, suggests a study. The protective effect of these cheap, commercially available chemicals, known as ‘plant strengtheners’, can help protect young ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Reuse of constructed wetland effluents for irrigation of energy crops

    The aim of this study was to evaluate biomass production of promising ‘no-food’ energy crops, Vetiveria zizanoides (L.) Nash, Miscanthus × giganteus Greef et Deu. and Arundo donax (L.), irrigated with low quality water at different evapotranspiration restitutions. Two horizontal subsurface flow (H-SSF) constructed ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • One crop, two ways, multiple benefits

    Nitrogen fixation is one of the best examples of cooperation in nature. Soil microbes – naturally occurring bacteria in the soil – work with plants to pull nitrogen from the air. They turn the nitrogen into a form the plant is able to use. In return, the plant lets the microbes eat some of the sugars it makes. Faba beans (also called fava beans) are one example of plants that work ...

  • Fine root distributions in oilseed and pulse crops

    Fine roots are of great importance in the uptake of water and nutrients from, and input of, carbon to the soil. This study determined the proportion of extra fine ( ...

  • Compost, manure and synthetic fertilizer influences crop yields, soil properties, nitrate leaching and crop nutrient content

    From 1993 to 2001, a maize-vegetable-wheat rotation was compared using either 1) composts, 2) manure, or 3) synthetic fertilizer for nitrogen nutrient input. From 1993 to1998, red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) and crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.) were used as an annual winter legume cover crop prior to maize production. From 1999 to 2001, hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.) served as the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Alternative crop rotations under mediterranean no-Tillage conditions: biomass, grain yield, and water-use efficiency

    In Mediterranean semiarid areas, barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are major crops because they are well adapted to limited-water environments. In this study we tested the performance of alternative rotations to the typical barley and wheat monocultures in a rainfed Mediterranean semiarid area of northeastern Spain under a no-tillage (NT) system. Four rotations were ...

  • Sprinkler irrigation changes maize canopy microclimate and crop water status, transpiration, and temperature

    During a sprinkler irrigation event some water is lost due to wind drift and evaporation (WDEL). After the irrigation event, plant-intercepted water is lost due to evaporation. The water lost causes microclimatic changes which could result in positive or negative plant physiological changes. We studied the microclimatic and physiological changes on two fields grown with maize (Zea mays L.) ...

  • Stevens Water and US Farm Bill Helps Farmers Optimize Crop Irrigation & Fertilization

    Agriculture is a major element for survival of the human race and of the economic system. 42 percent of the world’s laborers are employed in agriculture, making it by far the most common occupation. With agriculture using approximately 60 percent of available fresh water withdrawals, concerns continue to grow over farmers implementing water conservation practices. Also, increasing contamination ...

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