fiber crop Articles

  • Carbon fiber on the DELTA FORCE boom range

    Lower weight gives a more stable boom Carbon fiber helps the boom in many areas, primarily due to the low weight and the stiffness of the material which is one of its most distinguished strengths. The lower weight means that the center part gets fewer strengths to be controlled when the boom must be precisely controlled above the crop on rough ground. It is not much use to have a ...


    By Hardi International A/S

  • Chemical composition of residue from cereal crops and cultivars in dryland ecosystems

    Cropping systems in the dryland farming region of eastern Washington State are dominated by winter and spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Excessive levels of residue may be an obstacle in the adoption of conservation farming systems. Decomposition of cereal crop residues is associated with fiber and nutrient content, and growers have observed differences ...

  • A comparison of two cotton cultivars differing in maturity for within-canopy fiber property variation

    Improving uniformity in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fiber properties increases fiber processing performance. Our objective was to compare two cultivars differing in relative maturity for within-canopy variability of fiber physical properties and fiber surface chemical constituents. The cultivars (DPL 555 BG/RR [mid-full maturity] and PM 1218 BG/RR [early maturity]) were grown in plots on a ...

  • Comparative attributional LCA of annual and perennial ligno‐cellulosic feedstocks production, under Mediterranean climate, for bio‐refinery framework

    Annual fiber sorghum (FS) and perennial giant reed (GR) cultivated in the Mediterranean area, appear of interest due to their high productivity under drought conditions and the potential use as lignocellulosic feedstock for biorefinery purpose. This study compares the environmental constraints related to FS and GR produced in an experimental farms (Campania region), by means of an ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Forage potential of intercropping barley with faba bean, lupin, or field pea

    Annual cool-season grain legumes grown in mixtures with barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), may offer advantages over barley sole crops for forage production. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of intercropping ‘Snowbird’ tannin-free faba bean (Vicia faba L.), ‘Arabella’ narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.), and ‘Cutlass’ field pea (Pisum sativum L.), along with legume planting ...

  • Herbage, phosphorus, and nitrogen yields of winter-season forages on high-phosphorus soil

    In climates where cool seasons can produce a forage crop, annual grasses and forbs can be used on dairies to recycle nutrients back to the animals and to phytoremediate soils high in P or N. In north-central Texas, on a Windthorst fine sandy loam (fine, mixed, thermic, Udic Paleustalf) with 250 mg P kg–1, an on-dairy trial measured yields of dry matter (DM), N, and P, as well as fiber fractions ...

  • Impact of defoliation on corn forage quality

    Hail damage can be a serious problem on corn (Zea mays L.) grown for silage. The value of corn grown for silage is a function of both the yield and quality of the forage produced. An improved understanding of the effects of defoliation on forage quality would improve the ability of agronomists, farmers, and crop insurance adjusters to assess the economic impact of hail damage to corn harvested ...

  • Corn, a Vital Staple Food in Africa

    Africa contributes the least to global warming than any other continent. However, it suffers greatly from some of the more serious impacts of climate changes. The statistics are shocking: Africa emits roughly 4% of greenhouse gas emissions, while the United States emits 23% of the total global greenhouse gasses. Unfortunately, along with Asia, Africa is the region where crop production is the ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • How farm policy used to work

    In the period between the 1930s and 1992, farm bills generally instituted compensation policies that took the form of price supports. These policies were designed to manage the surplus production that resulted from centuries of developmental policies while allowing U.S. farmers the chance, with hard work and good management skills, to provide their family with a livelihood. Compensation policies ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Compost maturity effects on nitrogen and carbon mineralization and plant growth

    Improved predictive relationships between compost maturity and nitrogen (N) availability are needed. A total of 13 compost samples were collected from a single windrow over a 91 d period. Compost stability and maturity were assessed using both standard chemical analyses (total C and N, mineral N, total volatile solids) and other methods (CO2 evolution, commercial maturity kits, and neutral ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Cotton subsurface drip and overhead irrigation efficiency, maturity, yield, and quality

    Subsurface drip (SSD) is used as a water-efficient alternative to overhead irrigation in many crops. This study compared soil water, water use, crop maturity, lint yield, and fiber quality of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) grown with SSD to cotton grown with overhead irrigation. Three experiments were conducted at two Georgia locations in 2004 and 2005. Treatments consisted of overhead irrigated, ...

  • Yield, quality, and fruit distribution in bollgard/roundup ready and bollgard ii/roundup ready flex cottons

    New transgenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) technologies Bollgard II/Roundup Ready Flex (BGII/RRF) provide additional mechanisms for the cotton crop to retain early initiated fruiting structures positioned in the lower canopy. It may be possible, therefore, for early fruit retention to become too high with these new technologies resulting in early cutout and reduced yield. The objective of this ...

  • Can drip irrigation keep the Prairie Profitable?

    The use of flood and center pivot irrigation of crops via the waters of the Ogallala Aquifer is as hot a discussion topic as the current drought. To many who mine the aquifer to make a living, trying to keep a profitable way of life sustainable in a time when the broader public is seeking more conservation of resources yet wanting inexpensive, plentiful and safe food is problematic. Perhaps it's ...


    By Netafim USA

  • The cloud isn`t just for rain anymore

    Precision agriculture has been a key enabling technology to achieve higher yields with lower cost and less environmental impact, while keeping the cost of food fairly stable Has global agricultural productivity increased or decreased in the last 25 years? It has, in fact, more than doubled since 1985. Next to advances in seed genetics, precision agriculture has been a key enabling ...

  • Poor quality soil can lead to harmful impact: Stop erosion now

    Soil erosion is known as the wearing away of topsoil, leading to poor quality soil that is less conducive for plant and vegetation growth. In our series of blog posts focusing on erosion control, today we take a look at the harmful effects of soil erosion, and how they cause concerns not only to the environment, but also to human health and the economy as a whole. Poor Quality Soil ...


    By CoirGreen

  • Palm oil: not the evil we think it is

    Oil palm is a globally important crop, but our hatred of it stops us from pushing for better ways to develop it. The oil palm, one of around 2,600 species of palm, must be one of the most hated plants on Earth. Ask any self-respecting environmentalist, and his or her face is likely to turn red with anger at the mere mention of its reviled name: Oil Palm. The oil ...


    By Ensia

  • Compost Users Forum: The Applied Thoughts Of A Compost Theorist

    WITHIN a 60-mile radius of my office here in central California, there are 1,000 dairies — each having an average of 2,000 cows. They generate over four million tons of manure annually, so we are pretty much in the manure business whether we want to be or not. Somebody has to manage this material and help the farmers utilize it properly, fulfilling its potential monetary value. That’s what we ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • CoirGreen™ : Helping you think and act green

    Many of us depend heavily on the environment to make a living. Yet, knowingly or unknowingly to us, our actions can have negative impact on the environment, such as ...


    By CoirGreen

  • Improving Food Security in the Sahel is difficult, but achievable

    Africa’s Sahel suffers from degraded soils, erratic rainfall, and an exploding population—all of which hold huge implications for the region’s food security. A recent speech quantified just how dire the situation is this year. Valerie Amos, the United Nations coordinator for emergency relief, estimated at a conference in Rome earlier this month that 20 million people in the ...

  • Redefining ag-wastes as coproducts

    Alan Doering doesn’t have the word “waste” in his vocabulary. As the scientist heading up the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute’s (AURI) coproduct utilization program, Doering sees crop residue, agricultural processing leftovers and biomass as products with value worth exploring. “Every leftover or coproduct has a value,” Doering says. “Our goal is to find the best use with the highest ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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