grain price Articles

  • Rising Temperature, Rising Food Prices

    Agriculture as it exists today developed over 11,000 years of rather remarkable climate stability. It has evolved to maximize production within that climate system. Now, suddenly, the climate is changing. With each passing year, the agricultural system is becoming more out of sync with the climate system. In generations past, when there was an extreme weather event, such as a monsoon failure in ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Data Highlight: Arab Grain Imports Rising Rapidly

    The Arab countries in the Middle East and North Africa make up only 5 percent of the world’s population, yet they take in more than 20 percent of the world’s grain exports. Imports to the region have jumped from 30 million tons of grain in 1990 to nearly 70 million tons in 2011. Now imported grain accounts for nearly 60 percent of regional grain consumption. With water scarce, arable ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Grain case study - Miller Brewing Co.

    Smart Elbow® Installation Brought in $30,000 Under Projected Budget The compact design of the Smart Elbows saves space-the twelve 6" elbows shown here occupy the same space as a large desktop. They may also be rotated on their flanges for greater design flexibility and installation ease. At Miller Brewing Company's Fort Worth, TX, facility, staff engineer Roy Marin was faced with an ...


    By HammerTek Corporation

  • Why ethanol production will drive world food prices even higher in 2008

    We are witnessing the beginning of one of the great tragedies of history. The United States, in a misguided effort to reduce its oil insecurity by converting grain into fuel for cars, is generating global food insecurity on a scale never seen before. The world is facing the most severe food price inflation in history as grain and soybean prices climb to all-time highs. Wheat trading on the ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Farmers banded together to tackle early price and income problems

    Few weeks ago in this column we looked at the earliest agricultural policies that were put in place by the European settlers and their descendants in what is now the United States. For the most part, though not exclusively, the policies can best be described as developmental policies because they 1) increase the supply of inputs, 2) decrease the cost of inputs, or 3) improve the quality of ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • How can we create jobs, reduce food prices and boost economies?

    The fate of heads of state across the globe is tied in large part to their ability to ensure employment, economic growth, and access to cheap food and clean water. Rising food prices have helped topple dictators across the Middle East. Europe, the United States, Japan and other major economies are spending trillions of dollars to restore growth and jobs. Too often, efforts to address ...

  • Grain sorghum and corn comparisons: yield, economic, and environmental responses

    Grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is often grown where water stress is expected. But, improved drought tolerance in corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids has resulted in increased dryland corn production in preference to grain sorghum. However, grain sorghum may still have a yield advantage over corn in drought prone environments. This study was conducted to determine if grain sorghum has either a ...

  • Bumper 2011 Grain Harvest Fails to Rebuild Global Stocks

    The world’s farmers produced more grain in 2011 than ever before. Estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture show the global grain harvest coming in at 2,295 million tons, up 53 million tons from the previous record in 2009. Consumption grew by 90 million tons over the same period to 2,280 million tons. Yet with global grain production actually falling short of consumption in 7 ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Global Grain Stocks Drop Dangerously Low as 2012 Consumption Exceeded Production

    The world produced 2,241 million tons of grain in 2012, down 75 million tons or 3 percent from the 2011 record harvest. The drop was largely because of droughts that devastated several major crops—namely corn in the United States (the world’s largest crop) and wheat in Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, and Australia. Each of these countries also is an important exporter. Global grain ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • New Era of Food Scarcity Echoes Collapsed Civilizations

    The world is in transition from an era of food abundance to one of scarcity. Over the last decade, world grain reserves have fallen by one third. World food prices have more than doubled, triggering a worldwide land rush and ushering in a new geopolitics of food. Food is the new oil. Land is the new gold. This new era is one of rising food prices and spreading hunger. On the demand side of the ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • The 1996 “Freedom to Farm” Farm Bill

    The period of U.S. farm bills where the instruments were designed around compensation policies that used price support/supply management programs allowing farmers to remain in production during long periods of low prices—the result of four centuries of publicly-sponsored developmental policies—ended with the adoption of the 1996 Farm Bill. In some important ways, the demise of price ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Can the World Feed China?

    By Lester R. Brown Overnight, China has become a leading world grain importer, set to buy a staggering 22 million tons in the 2013–14 trade year, according to the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture projections. As recently as 2006—just eight years ago—China had a grain surplus and was exporting 10 million tons. What caused this dramatic shift? It wasn’t until 20 years ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • How farm policy used to work

    In the period between the 1930s and 1992, farm bills generally instituted compensation policies that took the form of price supports. These policies were designed to manage the surplus production that resulted from centuries of developmental policies while allowing U.S. farmers the chance, with hard work and good management skills, to provide their family with a livelihood. Compensation policies ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Evaluating multiple indices from a canopy reflectance sensor to estimate corn n requirements

    With the increasing cost of fertilizer N, there is a renewed emphasis on developing new technologies for quantifying in-season N requirements for corn (Zea mays L.). The objectives of this research are (i) to evaluate different vegetative indices derived from an active reflectance sensor in estimating in-season N requirements for corn, and (ii) to consider the influence of the N:Corn price ratio ...

  • Rethinking food production for a world of eight billion

    The World Food Programme and the Chinese government jointlyannounced that food aid shipments to China would stop at the end of theyear. For a country where a generation ago hundreds of millions of peoplewere chronically hungry, this was a landmark achievement. Not only hasChina ended its dependence on food aid, but almost overnight it has becomethe world’s third largest food aid donor. The key to ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Falling water tables` knock-on effect on falling harvests

    Scores of countries are overpumping aquifers as they struggle to satisfy their growing water needs. The drilling of millions of irrigation wells has pushed water withdrawals beyond recharge rates, in effect leading to groundwater mining. The failure of governments to limit pumping to the sustainable yield of aquifers means that water tables are now falling in countries that contain more than half ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Raising water productivity

    With water shortages emerging as a constraint on food production growth, the world needs an effort to raise water productivity similar to the one that nearly tripled land productivity during the last half of the twentieth century. Worldwide, average irrigation water productivity is now roughly 1 kilogram of grain per ton of water used. Since it takes 1,000 tons of water to produce 1 ton of grain, ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Adoption, utilisation and economic impacts of improved post-harvest technologies in maize production in Kapchorwa District, Uganda

    High post-harvest losses, poor quality and lack of value addition at the farm level constrain maize production in Uganda. Concern over these issues prompted the government to introduce improved post-harvest technologies to reduce losses. However, there remain a huge number of farmers still using local post-harvest methods. Farmers are unlikely to accept new technologies unless the perceived ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • A hotter planet means less on our plates

    In the Sunday November 22, 2009 issue of Outlook in the Washington Post, Lester Brown discusses the significant implications of food security in the upcoming Copenhagen Conference. As the U.N. climate-change conference in Copenhagen approaches, we are in a race between political tipping points and natural ones. Can we cut carbon emissions fast enough to keep the melting of the Greenland ice ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

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