poultry climate Articles

  • Unlocking the potential of poultry manure

    The poultry industry is one of the largest and fastest-growing agro-based industries in the world. At the same time, the growth brings along a number of environmental problems. One of the major environmental problems is the accumulation of large amounts of wastes, e.g. manure. In order to mitigate these problems new economically sustainable technologies are needed. Manure has often been ...


    By Ductor Corp.

  • Asger Petersen from Denmark maintain the same climate in his houses regardsless of doors beeing open or closed - Case story

    Asger Petersen from the marshland in the southwestern corner of Denmark has been producing chickens for nearly twenty years. -For many years I was a consultant in the feed industry. Since I became a poultry farmer myself, I have seen a lot of changes within the industry. The biggest impact on the industry was the introduction of the foot pad lesions scores in 2002. They were a challenge ...


    By DACS A/S

  • Case study - Low feed consumption – excellent growth

    Ann Andersen from Denmark has been a poultry producer since 1997. She has had the DACS ventilation system in both old, leaking buildings and in the new poultry houses built in 2010. Her chicken are healthy, they grow well and an examination of the animals has shown that their tracheas are clear as glass, which indicates that the air they breathe is fresh and oxygen-rich. - Right from the start I ...


    By DACS A/S

  • Why BioLargo Is Hot and Why Shares May Get Hotter

    Investors have waited patiently as BioLargo, Inc. (OTCQB: BLGO) spent millions of dollars and many years developing a world-class water treatment technology that promises to impact the world for good. In much of the world, water equates to life, and the need for clean water has never been so critical as now. Supply challenges are exacerbated by drought, pollution from industry and agriculture, ...


    By Biolargo, Inc.

  • Growing demand for soybeans threatens Amazon rainforest

    Some 3,000 years ago, farmers in eastern China domesticated the soybean. In 1765, the first soybeans were planted in North America. Today the soybean occupies more U.S. cropland than wheat. And in Brazil, where it spread even more rapidly, the soybean is invading the Amazon rainforest. For close to two centuries after its introduction into the United States the soybean languished as a curiosity ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Overfishing Threatens Critical Link in the Food Chain

    The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. Collectively known as forage fish, these species—including sardines, anchovies, herrings, and shrimp-like crustaceans called krill—feed on plankton and become food themselves for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Historically, people have eaten ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Planting trees and managing soils to sequester carbon

    As of 2007, the shrinking forests in the tropical regions were releasing 2.2 billion tons of carbon per year. Meanwhile, expanding forests in the temperate regions were absorbing 0.7 billion tons of carbon annually. On balance, a net of some 1.5 billion tons of carbon were being released into the atmosphere each year, contributing to global warming. The tropical deforestation in Asia is driven ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Global Grain Stocks Drop Dangerously Low as 2012 Consumption Exceeded Production

    The world produced 2,241 million tons of grain in 2012, down 75 million tons or 3 percent from the 2011 record harvest. The drop was largely because of droughts that devastated several major crops—namely corn in the United States (the world’s largest crop) and wheat in Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, and Australia. Each of these countries also is an important exporter. Global grain ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Does one of the world’s most abundant animals need protection from our appetite?

    As demand grows and habitat disappears, scientists ponder tighter controls on the Antarctic krill harvest. Barely longer than your thumb, weighing under an ounce and nearly translucent, delicate crustaceans known as krill are vital to ocean ecosystems around the world. In the waters that encircle Antarctica, krill are an essential food source for penguins, baleen and blue ...


    By Ensia

  • The localization of agriculture

    In the United States, there has been a surge of interest in eating fresh local foods, corresponding with mounting concerns about the climate effects of consuming food from distant places and about the obesity and other health problems associated with junk food diets. This is reflected in the rise in urban gardening, school gardening, and farmers’ markets. With the fast-growing local foods ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Composting Livestock Mortalities

    Performance, composting methods, environmental impacts and biosecurity of the process are evaluated for emergency disposal of cattle by research team at Iowa State University. A THREE-YEAR study was commissioned by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to evaluate the practical feasibility, performance, environmental impacts and biosecurity of using composting for emergency disposal - should a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • How green was my Vertical Farm?

    By 2050, 80% of the earth’s population will live in cities and 3 billion more people will need to be fed. The simple fact is we are running out of available land to grow enough food to feed them. If we can’t grow our cities outward to find more arable land, the only solution is to grow them upwards. This may change the way we design cities forever.The problem is real and immediate. Even by most ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Science’s role in growing diverse, nutritious food

    Can science meet the demand for more diverse and nutritious food? Jan Piotrowski investigates. The riots that swept Africa in 2007 and 2008 in response to the spiralling costs of staple crops brought the effects of food shortages into sharp focus. Images of unrest circled the globe, and the consequent instability brought to the forefront of political debate a question that had ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Latest Progress in Anaerobic Digestion

    Compared to countries like Germany and Denmark, the United States and Canada have a long way to go in creating the fundamental policy incentives and regulatory mandates that will encourage market development for anaerobic digestion (AD). Someone recently asked me how many years it would take to deploy AD systems on farms in North America that are large enough to economically use them. Given ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • In Business World

    In Business and BioCycle are holding their 7th Annual Conference on Renewable Energy From Organics Recycling, October 1-3, 2007 in Indianapolis, Indiana. The conference highlights renewable energy projects that cross a range of technologies and feedstock sources. Small and large-scale anaerobic digestion projects that incorporate animal manures, as well as food processing residuals, fats/ ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Financing an anaerobic digester

    LENDERS are generally well disposed to projects that diversify revenues while lowering costs and mitigating risks. Add a ready source of equity and you are well on the way toward financing a project that is a win-win proposition for the lender and the project developer. Such is the case with the anaerobic digester project at Geerlings Hillside Farm (GHF). The Geerlings's 8,000-head hog farm is ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • What`s New - In-Vessel Composting

    IF YOU are considering some sort of enclosed vessel for composting food residuals, yard trimmings, biosolids, manure, animal mortalities or other waste streams, there is no shortage of options to consider. Domestic and international technology providers offer agitated and nonagitated enclosed systems, as well as rigid and nonrigid containment. Unlike some of the other equipment categories in ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Cost-Benefit Analyses: Exploring the Economics of On-Farm Composting

    When exploring the merits of on-farm composting, the question most often raised is: What are the economics? How do the savings or revenues from on-farm composting compare to the costs? Of course, the answer is the ever present “it depends.” Expenses, resources, revenue opportunities, environmental constraints and circumstances vary greatly from one farm to the next. Most people would agree that ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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