B&W Trailer Hitches

B&W Trailer Hitches, we stand for the future of American manufacturing. The U.S. has lost 1.9 million manufacturing jobs to China alone over the last decade.¹ “Made in the USA” can succeed, but only if we rely on the principles that work in our own neighborhoods. We grow by earning trust and improving customer value, not by cutting costs. We treat each other as family, not as “labor” exportable to the lowest bidder. We let people use cutting-edge technology to make things safer, easier, and higher quality, rather than let technology use us. We respond to customers and changing markets by being right-sized and flexible, not just bigger.

Company details

1216 Hwy 224, PO Box 186 , Humboldt , Kansas 66748 USA

Locations Served

Business Type:
Manufacturer
Industry Type:
Agriculture
Market Focus:
Nationally (across the country)

At B&W Trailer Hitches, we stand for the future of American manufacturing. The U.S. has lost 1.9 million manufacturing jobs to China alone over the last decade.¹ “Made in the USA” can succeed, but only if we rely on the principles that work in our own neighborhoods. We grow by earning trust and improving customer value, not by cutting costs. We treat each other as family, not as “labor” exportable to the lowest bidder. We let people use cutting-edge technology to make things safer, easier, and higher quality, rather than let technology use us. We respond to customers and changing markets by being right-sized and flexible, not just bigger.

That’s why B&W Trailer Hitches is still in Humboldt, Kansas, a half-mile from the garage where Roger Baker and Joe Works changed the towing industry with the first Turnoverball™ gooseneck hitch 25 years ago. We enjoy being able to get the brightest talent in the industry around a single table within five minutes. Above all, we love being employee-owned, spreading responsibility for innovation and quality across all 200+ of us, but also spreading the rewards of success across the community.

Focus on bottom-line profits, and they will come at a price. American manufacturing has suffered from focusing on the wrong “bottom-line”. We stand—with our neighbors—for a deeper bottom-line.

¹Scott, Robert E. September 20, 2011. Growing U.S. trade deficit with China cost 2.8 million jobs between 2001 and 2010. Economic Policy Instutute, Briefing Paper #323.  Washington, D.C.: EPI.