agriculture soil sampling News

  • High levels of glyphosate in agricultural soil: ‘Extension of approval not prudent.’

    There has been a great deal of discussion about the use and extension of the approval of use of glyphosate as a herbicide. Glyphosate is the most used herbicide in Europe. In 2016 the approval by the European Commission for the use of this agent expired. However, an extension of approval of use is currently being discussed. One of the conditions of this is that the agent cannot have a negative ...

  • Soil scientists in Afghanistan

    As part of USDA’s effort to support the Afghanistan military campaign, Operation Enduring Freedom, the Natural Resources Conservation Service–National Soil Survey Laboratory (NRCS-NSSL), working in partnership with the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) developed an agreement to sample soils; teach local nationals about soil and water conservation, soil sampling, and techniques for ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • The Importance of Soil Sampling – Liquid Fertiliser Tanks Store Fertilizer Efficiently

    The importance of soil sampling was reinforced by Farming Life this week. It stated that good productive soils are the foundation of any successful farm system and that the ability of soils to supply nutrients at a time and in an appropriate quantity for grass and crop can be key to determining productivity. Therefore, a farms ability to manage soil fertility levels should be a primary objective. ...


    By ENDURAMAXX Storage Tanks

  • Ohio State Agronomy Workshop Jan. 19 to Focus on Soil Fertility

    Healthy soils are a key ingredient to produce strong crop yields, and understanding what nutrients your soils need is a fundamental step in that process, says an educator in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. Soil fertility is crucial to maximizing yield potential when growing crops, said Amanda Douridas, an Ohio State University Extension ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Effects of chemical fertiliser and animal manure on soil health compared

    Fertilising crops with cattle manure can lead to better soil quality than when synthetic fertiliser is used, recent research indicates. The use of cattle manure in the study led to greater soil fertility by encouraging higher microbial activity, and the researchers suggest that it could potentially improve soil’s ability to cope with periods of difficult growing conditions. The ...

  • Grassy field margins enhance soil biodiversity

    Grass strips at field margins are almost as valuable as hedgerows in encouraging diversity of soil creatures, according to new research. Six metre wide margin strips increase the number and variety of species such as earthworms, woodlice and beetles, and may act as corridors between isolated habitats. The study analysed the presence of invertebrates of three main feeding types - soil ingesters ...

  • Vegetable Workshop Series Offers Insight into Alternative Crops, Soil Health

    Growing hops and barley crops is an increasingly popular way to generate additional income from the farm. But before growers decide to devote some acreage to these new crops, they need to understand the costs and labor involved in growing them. Allen Gahler, an Ohio State University Extension educator in Sandusky County, said that while there is a strong and growing market for hops and barley in ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Free Webinar: Optimizing Soil Health by Managing Nutrients

    With today's challenges, it's becoming increasingly important to practice land stewardship, protect water quality, and ensure food security.  Maintaining soil health is crucial for increased crop productivity, preventing nutrient runoff, and decreasing costs of crop inputs.  One of the first steps in managing soil health is knowing current nutrient levels ...


    By NECi Superior Enzymes

  • MARVIN™ technology saves agriculture & horticulture time and money

    Four hundred thousand seedlings, nearly half of what a plant grower of, say, young tomato plants, produces in one season; this is the amount that sorting machines with the MARVIN technology can process in a single day. They rapidly make 3D models of the plants and accurately evaluate their size and features in milliseconds. “The information can be automatically recorded in a database and ...

  • USDA loans designated soil to Smithsonian Institution for `Dig It!` exhibition

    Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer today announced that USDA has loaned 54 designated state and territory soil samples to the Smithsonian Institution for a new soils exhibition that opens July 19 at the National Museum of Natural History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue, N.W. The 5,000-square foot exhibition is called 'Dig It! The Secrets of Soil.' In addition to the soil samples, 'Dig It!' ...

  • Increasing diversity through crop rotation boosts soil microbial biodiversity and productivity

    Planting a variety of crop species in rotation in agricultural fields increases the diversity of soil microbes below ground, recent research has found. This in turn positively affects soil organic matter, soil structure and aids the healthy functioning of the soil. The researchers say that rotational diversity can help farmers to grow crops in a more sustainable way that promotes soil stability. ...

  • Improved soil water sensors aid in irrigation management

    Agriculture, a large user of water for irrigation, is under pressure to reduce water use. Increased urban population growth has created more competition for limited water supplies. While growers have used soil moisture probes to aid in irrigation management in the past, earlier probes required maintenance or were expensive or inadequate.  New electronic sensors have been developed that require ...

  • Study by ARS microbiologist in Texas shows farming practices’ benefits to soil quality

    The first evaluation of alternative farming practices—based on changes in soil microbes—in the Texas High Plains has been done by an Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist. Soil microbiologist Veronica Acosta-Martinez has also done a similar analysis for land in USDA's Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), a first nationally. Changes in microbes can give a relatively early indication as to ...

  • Soil management: Longer crop rotations reduce carbon emissions

    Changing the way farmland is used could help increase the amount of organic carbon retained in soils. According to recent research, studies of different crop rotation patterns will help decision makers design policies which help reduce carbon emissions. Farming and forestry practices aimed at maximising the amount of carbon at land level are broadly referred to as 'LULUCF' - land use, land use ...

  • Maryland, Michigan Farmers Keep Soil, Environment Healthy

    As farming practices increasingly attract interest from the general public, two farmers are ensuring they meet public approval. They use proven management practices that focus on improving soil quality and maintaining a quality natural environment. In fact, getting the right nutrients to where they belong and in the right amounts when they’re needed enables them to improve yields while ...

  • Nutrient Management Plans: A Study in Cause and Effect

    It seems practical on the surface. Nutrient management plans (NMPs) should supply plants with ideal amounts of nutrients, minimize runoff, and maintain or even improve the soil condition. And the farmer behind the plan would work with a set of conservation practices designed to reduce harmful pollutants while still obtaining optimal crop yields. However, many U.S. Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs) ...

  • Identifying factors in Atrazine’s reduced weed control

    Invasive broadleaf weeds can destroy corn crops and fallow fields. Farmers use the chemical atrazine in herbicides to protect their plants. Despite atrazine’s controversial environmental impacts, it can provide long term residual control of many weed species. However, the loss of atrazine’s effectiveness has been a challenge for farmers in northeastern Colorado. In a collaborative ...

  • USDA launches new version of the web-based Soil Survey

    The latest version of the Web Soil Survey 2.1 (WSS) was recently launched by the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation (NRCS). The web-based program provides anyone with computer access a wealth of soils information including soil maps, properties, and interpretations aimed at helping its visitors with land use decisions. The web site, originally launched in August 2005, continues to be improved ...

  • Increasing potato production

    Despite sophisticated nutrient management of potato crops, quality and yield still see wide variability. Although nutrients are already well understood, the influence of other environmental factors remains understudied. A research team from Michigan State University conducted a study to determine how the chemical and physical properties of soil, along with the light waves the plant absorbs and ...

  • Understanding why rye works as a cover crop

    Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists may soon find a way to enhance the weed-killing capabilities of a cereal grain that enriches the soil when used as a winter cover crop. Rye is often grown in winter and killed in the spring, so the dead stalks can be flattened over soybean and vegetable fields to block sunlight and prevent spring weeds from getting the light they need to germinate. ...

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you