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  • Race is on to feed warming world

    It can take up to 30 years to improve a crop variety, test it and persuade farmers to adopt it. That means the speed of climate change in Africa could make a new variety of maize useless even before the first harvest, according to new research. But two separate studies that address the challenge of food security in a rapidly ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Water reform urgently needed in Asia to feed extra 1.5bn people by 2050, says new report

    A comprehensive new study of irrigation in Asia warns that, without major reforms and innovations in the way water is used for agriculture, many developing nations face the politically risky prospect of having to import more than a quarter of the rice, wheat and maize they will need by 2050. This warning, along with related forecasts and possible solutions, appear in a report entitled, ...

  • WEDA Fermi 4PX Winnning Innovation Star at SPACE

    On September 13, WEDA Dammann & Westerkamp were presented with the renowned Innovation Star in the Pig Management Category for their Fermentation Software Fermi 4PX. The eagerly sought-after price was awarded to the manufacturers of house equipment from Lower Saxonian Lutten within the framework of SPACE, the French leading trade fair for modern animal managements at Rennes. The responsible ...

  • New software helps farmers manage nutrients

    University of Missouri Extension has released a new Web-based application to help farmers manage soil nutrient needs on farms. Nutrient management helps farmers set rates and timing of fertilizer applications, said John Lory, MU Extension nutrient management specialist. Plans are required for some farms in cost-share programs and permitted animal feeding operations. The free MMPTracker tool is ...

  • Parasitic plants cause huge damage to rice crops in Africa

    Parasitic plants – plants that penetrate another plant and grow at its expense – have caused some $200 million worth of damage to the African rice harvest this year, at the cost of 15 million meals a day. If no effective measures are developed and implemented against these parasites, the damage will increase over the coming years by some $30 million a year. This has been revealed by a ...

  • Crunching genomes to boost animal health

    FAO has chosen the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics as a designated reference centre to expand its access to state-of the-art technology in combating dangerous viral infections, including avian influenza and foot-and-mouth disease, in farm animals and wildlife. The SIB is equipped with high performance computers, ...

  • Dangerous nitrogen pollution could be halved

    The most important fertilizer for producing food is, at the same time, one of the most important risks for human health: nitrogen. Chemical compounds containing reactive nitrogen are major drivers of air and water pollution worldwide, and hence of diseases like asthma or cancer. If no action is taken, nitrogen pollution could rise by 20 percent by 2050 in a middle-of-the-road scenario, according ...

  • Rubisco activase best clue for better photosynthesis in fluctuating light

    Scientists and plant breeders who are aiming to improve food production by improving photosynthesis in crop plants, would make a good choice if they chose to change the composition and concentration of the protein Rubisco activase. In conditions where light intensity changes often and strongly, Rubisco activase is an important limiting factor in boosting the photosynthesis process when light ...

  • Scientists help farmers create greener dairies

    Cows stand patiently in a tent-like chamber at a research farm in western Wisconsin, waiting for their breath to be tested. Outside, corrals have been set up with equipment to measure gas wafting from the ground. A nearby corn field contains tools that allow researchers to assess the effects of manure spread as fertilizer. Scientists based at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have started a ...


    By Associated Press

  • Advanced Valoya LED Solution for Queen Mary University of London

    Valoya drives Queen Mary University’s research into higher yields in agricultural crops in collaboration with Microsoft Valoya (Helsinki, Finland), a leading provider of advanced plant lighting systems, worked with Microsoft Corp. to create next generation of state of the art lighting system using Valoya’s advanced LED lights, Microsoft Azure and Microsoft Azure ...


    By Conviron

  • Use of residues from agriculture and forestry as energy source improves food security

    The sustainability of growing crops for use as energy sources has been disputed for many years. A potentially attractive alternative is to use waste and residues from agricultural and forestry. However, using waste and other residues may have an impact on land use, biodiversity and food security. The additional sources of income from the sale of waste and other residues could prompt an increase ...

  • American society of agronomy

    Recycling manure is an important practice, especially for large livestock producers. Manure can be used as fertilizer to aid in crop production, aiding livestock producers that grow their own feed crops. While manure does provide a rich nutrient source for crops, it also can contribute to nutrient leaching and runoff. This can contaminate the surrounding ecosystem and lead to eutrophication of ...

  • Giumarra Reedley activates PureSense Soil Moisture Monitoring Systems and realizes immediate benefits

    One month after installing PureSense to manage irrigation for 80 acres of stone fruit trees, Giumarra Reedley, a division of the Giumarra Companies, is seeing promising results. Since PureSense's Field Monitoring Stations were installed, the orchard's root zone is already at least 12 inches deeper and trees are showing 8 to 14 inches of unexpected new growth. "In past growing seasons, we have not ...


    By PureSense Inc.

  • Pew`s Boreal Forest Tour Showcased at Google Earth Canada Launch

    In just three minutes, participants at today's Google Earth Outreach Canada launch will get a nonstop, coast-to-coast, interactive experience with the earth's "green halo," the boreal forest. The Pew Environment Group ...

  • ISRIC releases upgraded SoilGrids system: up to two times improved accuracy of predictions

    ISRIC – World Soil Information has just released a major update of its global predictions of soil properties and classes, now available at a spatial resolution of 250 m. The previous SoilGrids system at 1 km resolution has been systematically upgraded and the accuracy of the predictions has been improved (up to two times) compared to the previous predictions. The new version of SoilGrids ...

  • 2007 El Nino Pushing Superheated Globe to New Record

    LONDON, UK, January 5, 2007 (ENS) - Climate change scientists predict that 2007 is likely to be the warmest year on record globally, beating the current record set in 1998. Calling it a 'startling forecast,' scientists at the British Meteorological Office said Thursday that the potential for a record 2007 arises from an El Nino warming pattern already established in the ...

  • Farmer-Funded Innovations: checkoff breakthroughs support on-farm profitability

    Successful companies in the aviation, communications, computer and medical industries don’t stand still. They find solutions that will keep them a step ahead of the competition. That goes for farmers, too. Soybean farmers today see the results of innovation everywhere they turn. More seed varieties and machinery applications. More ways to get the information they need to help them make ...


    By United Soybean Board (USB)

  • Husum shows that it is the exhibition venue for grass roots energy transition

    New Energy Husum closes its doors today a thoroughly positive result. “The fair has once again shown that it is the optimal platform for players in the grass roots energy transition, and this has been substantiated by the high visitor numbers and the positive feedback from the exhibitors”, says a very pleased exhibition boss Peter Becker. Despite the challenges that the sector is ...


    By Krampitz Communications

  • Cereal Crops Feeling the Heat

    LIVERMORE, California (ENS) - Warming temperatures since 1981 have caused annual losses of about US$5 billion for six major cereal crops, new research has found. This is the first study to estimate how much global food production already has been affected by climate change. From 1981 to 2002, fields of wheat, corn and barley throughout the world have produced a combined 40 million ...

  • Sapphire Energy and Institute of Systems Biology Partner on Commercial Algae Production

     Sapphire Energy, a world leader in producing crude oil from algae, and Institute for Systems Biology (ISB), the pioneers of the cross-disciplinary and integrative systems approach to research, today ...


    By Sapphire Energy

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