fertilizer runoff News

  • World Soil Day hails symbiotic role of pulses to boost sustainable agriculture

    Soil and pulses can make major contributions to the challenge of feeding the world's growing population and combating climate change, especially when deployed together, according to Soils and Pulses: Symbiosis for Life, a new report by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization released on  ...

  • Arsenic in field runoff linked to poultry litter

    Fields amended with poultry litter can accumulate significant levels of arsenic, according to studies by USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and associates. These findings provide key information about the agricultural pollutants that can build up in agricultural soils over time—and possibly migrate into nearby streams and rivers. Poultry producers have sometimes ...

  • Compost filter socks improve runoff from Croplands

    Water runoff from cropped farm fields can contain large amounts of eroded soil as well as some of the fertilizer and herbicide. Expanding on existing conservation practices, a team of scientists has tested whether compost filters socks in grassed waterways would reduce sediment flow and retain dissolved chemicals in runoff. The researchers observed reduced sediment in a non-tilled field and ...

  • Fertilizers – a growing threat to sea life

    A rise in carbon emissions is not the only threat to the planet. Changes to the nitrogen cycle, caused in large part by the widespread use of fertilizers, are also damaging both water quality and aquatic life. These concerns are highlighted by Professor Grace Brush, from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, USA, in her historical review1 of landscape changes around Chesapeake Bay, a large ...


    By Springer

  • Tillage and reduced-input rotations affect runoff from agricultural fields

    A new study from researchers at the USDA Agricultural Research Service provides information about runoff under different management practices and can help farmers choose the practice that is best for them. No-till management practices can reduce soil erosion, but evidence suggests they can also lead to increased runoff of dissolved phosphorus from soil surfaces. Meanwhile, farmers looking ...

  • Fertilizer placement affects nutrient leaching patterns

    Controlled-release fertilizers (CRFs) are a widely used method of delivering nutrients to nursery container crops. The fertilizers contain encapsulated solid mineral nutrients that dissolve slowly in water, and are then released into substrates over an extended period of time. Although the use of CRFs is an accepted practice, growers and researchers are always looking for ways to decrease ...

  • Fertilizer Use to Surpass 200 Million Tonnes in 2018

    Global fertilizer use is likely to rise above 200.5 million tonnes in 2018, 25 percent higher than recorded in 2008. World fertilizer consumption will grow by 1.8 percent a year through 2018, according to FAO's new report "World fertilizer trends and outlook to 2018." At the same time "the global capacity of fertilizer products, intermediates and raw materials will increase further," the report ...

  • Many Countries Reaching Diminishing Returns in Fertilizer Use

    By Lester R. Brown When German chemist Justus von Liebig demonstrated in 1847 that the major nutrients that plants removed from the soil could be applied in mineral form, he set the stage for the development of the fertilizer industry and a huge jump in world food production a century later. Growth in food production during the nineteenth century came primarily from expanding cultivated area. It ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • New Poultry Litter Applicator Can Cut Nutrient Runoff, Protect Water Quality

    Researchers will demonstrate a prototype farm implement that slashes nutrient runoff and bacterial contamination from poultry litter at this year’s Manure Science Review. Co-hosted by Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Smart farming technique to boost yields, cut fertilizer pollution

    Researchers at Lancaster University are using X-rays to help farmers increase yields and cut water pollution following an unexpected discovery in a pea and bean crop. Plant and Soil Scientists hope to combine two new technologies to provide a rapid "same day" measurement of soil phosphorus availability, enabling farmers and growers to make more informed decisions about fertiliser ...


    By Lancaster University

  • What the Fertilizer Industry Has Been Doing to Reduce Groundwater Pollution

    The fertilizer industry is very concerned and engaged in the issue of nitrate contamination in California's groundwater supplies, according to Richard Cornett, communications director for the Western Plant Health Association in Sacramento, a trade group that represents fertilizer companies, manufacturers and retailers. Regarding a recent UC Davis study on the issue, the fertilizer industry ...


    By Marketwire

  • Green fertilizer demand grows on inflation, pollution concerns and shortages

    An agricultural crisis is brewing in the United States which is pulling farmers from several directions.  Crop shortfalls are pushing grain prices to record levels while fertilizer costs, already at record levels, are forecast to rise even further when the 2008 planting season begins. The 2007 planting season saw the price of fuel and fertilizer soar and while this year's grain crops prove ...


    By Axcess News

  • Fertilizer run-off killing Gulf of Mexico marine life

    Improved management of crops and perennials could go a long way toward alleviating the problem of hypoxia, which claims thousands of fish, shrimp and shellfish in the Gulf of Mexico each spring. An assessment by a team led by Virginia Dale of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Environmental Sciences Division concludes that low oxygen levels in water, or hypoxia, causes problems throughout the ...

  • Owner of fertilizer and feed supplement maker in Fairbury, Neb., to pay $30,000 penalty for violations of clean water act (NE)

    International Minerals Technology, LLC, of The Woodlands, Texas, has agreed to pay a $30,000 civil penalty to the United States to settle allegations that it violated the federal Clean Water Act at its Tetra Micronutrients production facility in Fairbury, Neb. Tetra Micronutrients produces zinc and manganese fertilizers and feed supplements at the facility located at 71025 569th Avenue in ...

  • EPA applauds Maryland lawn fertilizer bill for helping meet chesapeake bay pollution diet goals

    EPA today applauded Governor O’Malley and the Maryland House and Senate for passing legislation that will minimize polluted runoff from lawns and achieve measureable reductions in nitrogen and phosphorus to local waterways and the Chesapeake Bay. “Limiting the impact of fertilizers is exactly the kind of commitment that provides EPA with assurance that together, we will achieve our ...

  • Love a lush, green lawn?

    A lush green lawn is lovely to look at, but too much of a good thing can be bad. Often, that beautiful lawn is the result of regular fertilizing. An abundance of nitrogen and other nutrients in natural waterways can cause trouble for aquatic plant and animal life. High levels of nitrogen and phosphorus can cause an overgrowth of algae in the water, which then blocks light from getting to native ...


    By Eco Partners, Inc.

  • FEECO International provides solutions minimizing phosphate contaminations in water shed

    FEECO an industry leader of fertilizer, material handling, and organic waste solutions is currently working with Brown County on the Brown County Waste Transformation Initiative (BCWTI). The principle of the project is to be able to take the county’s organic waste, process it and sell it around the world as nutrient-rich, pathogen-free fertilizer. “Making fertilizer out of waste is nothing novel ...


    By FEECO International, Inc.

  • Carbon credits to be used to fund GM food crops

    US biotech firm Arcadia Biosciences has announced a plan to help fund the planting of genetically modified rice with carbon credits. The company will work with the Chinese government to give farmers who plant their crops carbon credits, which they can then sell on the global carbon trading market. Arcadia is touting its GM rice as a greener alternative to the regular crop. The plant has had a ...

  • Nominations Open for 2015 4R Advocate Awards Program

    The Fertilizer Institute (TFI) today launched the 2015 4R Advocate Awards Program with a call for entries from retailers wishing to highlight the exceptional nutrient stewardship practices of their grower customers.  The 4R Advocate Award program, now in its fourth year, recognizes farmers who are protecting the environment, boosting profitability and benefiting society through nutrient ...

  • Nitrogen mysteries in urban grasslands

    Areas of turf-forming species created and maintained by humans for aesthetic and recreational (not grazing) purposes, i.e. “urban grasslands” are an extremely common, but poorly studied ecosystem type. There are over 150,000 km2of urban grasslands in the U.S. and many receive high rates of fertilizer, creating concerns about nutrient runoff to streams, lakes, and estuaries and emissions of ...

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