tree analysis News

  • Frankincense tree has not regenerated for the last half century

    Frankincense is a resin that is tapped from a dry forest tree in the Horn of Africa, the Arabian peninsula and India. The European market is dominated by frankincense from Ethiopia. But the tree populations are under threat. “We found no frankincense trees younger than half a century”, says Motuma Tolera Feyissa, who defended his PhD thesis on this subject yesterday. Frans Bongers is ...

  • Polluted urban soil damages lime trees

    The impact of polluted urban soil on trees is highlighted in a recent study from Latvia. The researchers found that high salt levels from de-icing chemicals and nutrient imbalance in soil damaged lime trees growing in the city of Riga. Trees planted in cities are an important part of the urban landscape, providing a range of benefits, from enhancing biodiversity to promoting a feeling of ...

  • Trees in urban areas may improve mental health

    Doctors prescribe fewer antidepressants in urban areas with more trees on the street, according to recent UK research. The study examined the link between mental health and wellbeing and the presence of trees in London neighbourhoods. Its findings support the idea that maintaining a link to nature, even in an urban area, may help provide a healthy living environment. Natural features ...

  • Controlled forest fires could kill invasive tree disease

    In a new study, researchers examined the potential influence of human-driven changes in land-use on disease establishment in forests. The research suggests that changes in forest management, which encourage greater and more dense forest cover, are creating environmental conditions that promote disease. The invasive, fungal-like Phytophthora ramorum causes Sudden Oak Death (SOD), which is ...

  • 100,000 Trees and Counting: Dominion Branches Out With Project Plant It!

    Dominion Resources and its award-winning environmental education program, Project Plant It!, will celebrate a milestone in April with the ceremonial planting of the 100,000th tree distributed to students since the program was launched in 2007. According to the Virginia Department of Forestry, the equivalent of more than 250 acres of new forest land will be created if all 100,000-plus tree ...


    By Dominion

  • Climate change killing trees across the Sahel, says study

    Trees throughout Africa's Sahel region — vital to peoples' livelihoods — are dying as a result of long-term drought linked to climate change, according to a study. It found that one in six trees in the region has died since the 1950s, whilst a fifth of species has disappeared locally, because of rising ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Amazon soaking up less carbon as tree deaths rise

    The Amazon rainforest is losing its capacity to absorb carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, raising concerns about how the forest will respond to future climate and atmospheric changes, according to a study in ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • The 4A`s: alerts, answers, analysis, and advancement will eliminate the silliness

    Silliness is the best descriptor of many of the situations we face.  Here are some examples: Because it is difficult to measure opacity (air cleanliness) at the end of the process (after the scrubber), there are requirements to measure it in the middle of the process. Most environmental decisions involve reducing one contaminant while increasing others; however, there is no common ...


    By The McIlvaine Company

  • Research provides insight into the impacts of droughts in dry Alpine forests

    The impacts of drought on European trees are of high concern, especially under a changing climate. New research has indicated that, if summers become continually drier, sensitive species, such as larch and spruce, will suffer reduced growth in some Alpine areas. This could potentially compromise ecosystem services provided by forests in these areas. Drought can have major impacts on the growth ...

  • Greenhouse Gases Rise From Forests Damaged by Katrina

    Losses inflicted by Hurricane Katrina on Gulf Coast forest trees are great enough to cancel out a year's worth of new tree growth in other parts of the country, according to a new study led by biologist Jeffrey Chambers of Tulane University. 'The carbon that will be released as these trees decompose is enough to cancel out an entire year's worth of net gain by all U.S. forests. And this is only ...

  • Terrestrial Laser Scanning to measure forest parameters

    In November landConsult completed the second service contract with a national forest adminisitration in eastern Germany. Using a FARO Focus 3D Scanner and a Stonex GNSS more than 5 heactares with thousands of broadleaf trees and conifers have been  scanned. All scanned forests are part of a permanent monitoring system to research tree quality and ecological parameters. The 3D modells are ...

  • Conserving the genetic diversity of Europe’s forests

    Conserving genetic diversity is vital to allow populations to adapt in the face of changing conditions. A new study, assessing the conservation of genetic diversity of trees across Europe, has identified areas for improvement that could help maintain the genetic diversity of Europe’s forests. Without a diverse gene pool, whole populations of animals and plants may be unable to adapt to new ...

  • Restoring forests: an opportunity for Africa

    New research shows that Africa offers some of the greatest opportunities globally for restoring forests. This post originally appeared on Mongabay. Tropical forest news last week was dominated by Indonesia and Brazil. Forest clearing has surged over the past year in parts of ...

  • Low-altitude aerial images allow early detection of devastating avocado disease

    Low-altitude aerial images can detect laurel wilt, a devastating avocado disease, giving growers an early way to identify diseased trees and perhaps help reduce losses to the $100 million-a-year economic impact avocados provide Florida. Reza Ehsani, an associate professor in agricultural and biological engineering at the UF/IFAS Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred, used a ...

  • Bringing nitrogen out to pasture

    Cows in Brazil might start bellowing "leguuume" rather than "moo." That's because Jose Dubeux Jr. wants to plant more legume trees in cow pastures. Dubeux is an assistant professor of Agronomy at North Florida Research & Education Center. Growing up, Dubeux spent a lot of time on his grandparents' farm in Brazil. There he developed a passion for livestock operations and the grasslands on ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • The Executive Director of the IOC visits the Embassy of Jordan in Madrid

    The Executive Director of the International Olive Council, Mr Abdellatif Ghedira, was received on 26 September 2016 by His Exellency Mr Ghassan Abdel Rahim Odeh Majali, Ambassador of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan in Madrid. On his first visit to the country’s embassy, Mr Ghedira highlighted the importance of Jordan within the Organisation, having been a member of the IOC since 2002. ...

  • Agdia Releases New Molecular Test for Avocado Sunblotch Viroid

    Agdia, Inc. (Elkhart, IN) has commercialized a Nucleic Acid Hybridization Assay for Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBVd). ASBVd is found in avocado growing regions worldwide.  Trees that are infected with ASBVd can result in a loss of yield and / or production of unmarketable fruit.  However, symptoms are not always present making pro-active testing a critical disease control ...


    By Agdia Incorporated

  • UF researchers develop effective, inexpensive citrus greening detector

    While a commercially available cure for crop-killing citrus greening remains elusive, University of Florida researchers have developed a tool to help growers combat the insidious disease: an efficient, inexpensive and easy-to-use sensor that can quickly detect whether a tree has been infected. That early warning could give growers enough lead time to destroy plagued trees and save the ...

  • North Korea lifts the veil on its agroforestry practices

    A new study offers a rare glimpse into North Korea's agriculture and forestry policies, and may open up new international connections with the country, say researchers. The report describes how locally appropriate, participatory agroforestry is helping reverse food shortages and land degradation.  According to Meine van Noordwijk, co-author of the study and chief science advisor at the ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • New irrigation strategies for pecans in humid climates

    Georgia is the largest pecan producing state in the U.S. Although this humid region receives an average of 127 cm or more rainfall annually, periods of moisture stress can occur during the pecan growing season, particularly during August and September when pecans are in the kernel-filling stage and water demand is at its peak. Pecan producers throughout the region depend on irrigation strategies ...

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