evapotranspiration News

  • UF/IFAS avocado irrigation app should save money, water

    Avocado growers now know that a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences mobile irrigation app works well to save money while maintaining crop yields. This data, reported in a new study, is critical for an industry that has a $100 million a year economic impact on Florida. It’s also important because agriculture uses about 70 percent of the world’s water, the ...

  • Taking earth`s temperature via satellite

    Imagine adding a thermometer to Google Earth. That's the vision of Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists Martha Anderson and Bill Kustas, who see the need for high-resolution thermal infrared imaging tools--such as those aboard the aging Landsat satellites--as vital to monitoring earth's health. These thermal data are especially important given the combination of global warming and the ...

  • Water demand for crops may rise in northern Germany under warmer climate

    By 2070, there may be insufficient water for irrigation to ensure yields and profitability for some crops currently grown in northern Germany - if the IPCC´s worst case climate change scenario becomes a reality - new research warns. To reduce future demand for water under a changing climate, the study suggests that farmers grow different crops and change their management practices. In ...

  • Forest management for climate change adaptation must fit the context

    Forest management could help adaptation to climate change through its effects on water supply. A long-term US-based study has analysed the impact of forested land use changes on water flow into streams and rivers. It indicated that converting forests from deciduous to pine trees could help water storage in extreme wet conditions, but may be unsuitable in droughts. As such, it recommends tailoring ...

  • Forest management for climate change adaptation must fit the context

    Forest management could help adaptation to climate change through its effects on water supply. A long-term US-based study has analysed the impact of forested land use changes on water flow into streams and rivers. It indicated that converting forests from deciduous to pine trees could help water storage in extreme wet conditions, but may be unsuitable in droughts. As such, it recommends tailoring ...

  • Homeowners like money-saving benefits of smart irrigation controllers

    Smart irrigation controllers, technologies used to decrease landscape water applications, are catching on in Florida. Incentivized by governmental agencies and water utilities in an effort to reduce public-supply water demand and conserve water resources, the controllers are becoming more popular with homeowners in this high water-use state. A new study evaluated homeowners' satisfaction with ...

  • Australia chosen as first country to launch Manna Irrigation Intelligence

    Australia has been strategically chosen to be the first country to release Manna Irrigation Intelligence solution (a subsidiary of Rivulis), a revolutionary sensor-free software system designed to assist growers make better irrigation decisions. Using advanced satellite imaging technology, combined with real-time hyper-local weather, Manna Irrigation Intelligence ...


    By Rivulis Irrigation

  • Study shows potential for sweetpotato production in Pacific Northwest

    Sweetpotato, a warm-season root crop grown across the world, needs heat and humidity to flourish. In the United States, commercial sweetpotato production occurs predominantly in the southeastern states and California, while production farther north is limited. Recently, Oregon State University researchers discovered cultural practices that could help to increase sweetpotato production in the ...

  • New satellite sensing tool for improving agricultural land use observation

    FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) data indicate that annually 2500 km3 of freshwater are used for agricultural production, which amounts to 70% of the water resources the whole of humanity consumes in a year. With the global population continuing to grow at a high pace, it is essential to optimize the use of water resources and to increase agricultural production in ...

  • Research provides insight into the impacts of droughts in dry Alpine forests

    The impacts of drought on European trees are of high concern, especially under a changing climate. New research has indicated that, if summers become continually drier, sensitive species, such as larch and spruce, will suffer reduced growth in some Alpine areas. This could potentially compromise ecosystem services provided by forests in these areas. Drought can have major impacts on the growth ...

  • New irrigation strategies for pecans in humid climates

    Georgia is the largest pecan producing state in the U.S. Although this humid region receives an average of 127 cm or more rainfall annually, periods of moisture stress can occur during the pecan growing season, particularly during August and September when pecans are in the kernel-filling stage and water demand is at its peak. Pecan producers throughout the region depend on irrigation strategies ...

  • Warming will leave drought-hit California reeling

    Things could soon get worse for drought-hit California. New research predicts that, by the close of the century, global warming could have reduced the flow of water from the Sierra Nevada mountains by at least a quarter. Michael Goulden, associate professor of earth system science at the University of California ...


    By Climate News Network

  • “Efficient” irrigation tool may deplete more water

    An Israeli water engineer was sitting under a tree one day when he noticed a leaking faucet slowly drip water to the tree's roots, a nearly 50-year-old irrigation tale says. The idea inspired the invention of modern drip irrigation, also known as micro-irrigation. The method runs water through plastic tubes that release the flow through small holes directly to crop roots or stems. The precise ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • The high rise Urban farms of the future

    Imagine a full-scale farm right in the heart of New York City, in the deserts of Darfur or on the moon.  While you might have to wait some time for your lunar lettuce, vertical farming technologies are increasing the possibilities of cultivating crops much more efficiently here on earth.  Moving farms into buildings might change the way much of humanity grows its food.  And while ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • American society of agronomy presents 2011 class of fellows

    The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) will recognize the following individuals at the 2011 Awards Ceremony during their Annual Meeting on Oct. 16-19 in San Antonio, TX, www.acsmeetings.org. ASA has been selecting outstanding members as Fellows since 1924. Members of the Society nominate worthy colleagues based on their professional achievements ...

  • Jelly Belly Candy Company Selects ValleyCrest and HydroPoint for Major WeatherTRAK Installation

    HydroPoint Data Systems, Inc. and ValleyCrest Landscape Maintenance announced a partnership today with Jelly Belly Candy Company to implement the ...

  • How green was my vertical farm?

    By 2050, 80% of the earth’s population will live in cities and 3 billion more people will need to be fed. The simple fact is we are running out of available land to grow enough food to feed them. If we can’t grow our cities outward to find more arable land, the only solution is to grow them upwards. This may change the way we design cities forever. The problem is real and ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

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