crop insurance Articles

  • Drought aspects – fostering resilience through insurance

    Droughts are silent killers, with the potential to cause enormous losses to society as a whole and to the insurance industry. Many loss-bringers are unseen, and the result of secondary events. This makes it difficult to assess the losses involved. Insurance against drought is particularly important in the agricultural sector, but in practice only feasible with governmental involvement. Some ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Crop gene banks are preserving the future of agriculture. But who’s preserving them?

    As climate change makes crop diversity even more important, gene banks struggle to stay afloat. During the past few years of civil war in Syria, rebel fighters have destroyed Shia mosques and Christian graves, and burned and looted Christian churches while the Islamic State group has demolished priceless artifacts in the region. Nothing seemed sacred to the disparate ...


    By Ensia

  • Paying a premium for climate resilience

    What is the best way to protect vulnerable rural communities from the damaging impacts of climate change? Insurance could be an answer, but it raises a number of difficult questions. To illustrate, the New York Times recently ran a story, “Report Says a Crop Subsidy Cap ...

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • A Business Case for Building Climate Resilience

    “The business case for adaptation is improving.” These were the promising words from Daniel Dowling of PriceWaterhouseCoopers, shared during a breakout session at a recent conference called Climate Finance and Private Sector: Investing in New ...

  • Synthetic nitrogen fertilizers deplete soil nitrogen: a global dilemma for sustainable cereal production

    Received for publication December 19, 2008. Cereal production that now sustains a world population of more than 6.5 billion has tripled during the past 40 yr, concurrent with an increase from 12 to 104 Tg yr–1 of synthetic N applied largely in ammoniacal fertilizers. These fertilizers have been managed as a cost-effective form of insurance against low yields, without regard to the inherent effect ...

  • Impact of defoliation on corn forage quality

    Hail damage can be a serious problem on corn (Zea mays L.) grown for silage. The value of corn grown for silage is a function of both the yield and quality of the forage produced. An improved understanding of the effects of defoliation on forage quality would improve the ability of agronomists, farmers, and crop insurance adjusters to assess the economic impact of hail damage to corn harvested ...

  • Easter Freeze of 2007: analysis by the National Climatic Data Center

    Unseasonably warm weather in March 2007 over the eastern half of the United States prompted early growth of many agricultural and horticultural crops, ranging from wheat in the Central Plains to fruit trees and pastures across the Southeast and parts of the Midwest. March monthly temperatures averaged between 2 and 6°F above normal in these areas, and this was the second warmest March on record ...

  • The world needs our journalism. We need your support.

    Do you think the world needs more high-quality, trustworthy environmental reporting? Stories that bridge partisan divides and move beyond problems to explore solutions? And guidance for tomorrow’s environmental communicators? If you answered yes to these questions, then we need your help today! Your ...


    By Ensia

  • Climate change to worsen drought, diminish corn yields in Africa

    Original story at MIT News Nearly 25 percent of the world’s malnourished population lives in sub-Saharan Africa, where more than 300 million people depend on corn, or maize, as their main food ...

  • Composters Build Strong Links to California Farms

    The rapidly increasing amounts of compost applied to California farms can be traced to numerous factors — better crops, fewer disease problems, greater emphasis on product quality, mandated state recycling goals, savings in disposal costs and savings in chemical inputs. And then there’s the factor of friendship, longtime personal relationships that build trust between composters and farm ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • How green was my Vertical Farm?

    By 2050, 80% of the earth’s population will live in cities and 3 billion more people will need to be fed. The simple fact is we are running out of available land to grow enough food to feed them. If we can’t grow our cities outward to find more arable land, the only solution is to grow them upwards. This may change the way we design cities forever.The problem is real and immediate. Even by most ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Farmers banded together to tackle early price and income problems

    Few weeks ago in this column we looked at the earliest agricultural policies that were put in place by the European settlers and their descendants in what is now the United States. For the most part, though not exclusively, the policies can best be described as developmental policies because they 1) increase the supply of inputs, 2) decrease the cost of inputs, or 3) improve the quality of ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Global Grain Stocks Drop Dangerously Low as 2012 Consumption Exceeded Production

    The world produced 2,241 million tons of grain in 2012, down 75 million tons or 3 percent from the 2011 record harvest. The drop was largely because of droughts that devastated several major crops—namely corn in the United States (the world’s largest crop) and wheat in Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, and Australia. Each of these countries also is an important exporter. Global grain ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • It’s critical to blend climate tracking with development

    During the opening ceremony of the COP 20 climate conference, Christiana Figueres, executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, remarked that the bustling halls and sun-drenched grass patches of the conference site were set up in just six weeks. The ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Compost Science & Utilization Current research June 2007

    CROP RESPONSE Growth and transpiration of tomato seedlings grown in hazelnut husk compost under water stress Investigator: Damla Bender Ozenc, Ordu University, Department of Soil Science, Ordu, Turkey Objectives: To determine effects of composted hazelnut husk (CHH) on tomato seedlings grown under water stress conditions. Seven media were prepared using CHH mixed, in different ratios, with native ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Questions and answers about Lake Erie toxic algae

    Hundreds of thousands of people in Toledo, Ohio, and nearby southeastern Michigan were unable to use tap water fromSaturday until Monday morning because of unsafe levels of a contaminant called microcystin in Lake Erie. Here are questions and answers about the situation: Q. What is microcystin? A. A toxin produced by microcystis, a type of ...


    By Associated Press

  • Hurricane Clean Up for City of St. Petersburg

    Untitled Document THE city of St. Petersburg, Florida, after dodging Hurricane Charley's direct hit, received fringe winds from Hurricanes ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • New reports reveal the human and financial costs of large-scale land acquisitions

    The Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI), a coalition of groups working for the rights of rural people to access and use their local natural resources, recently released two reports on the state of large-scale land acquisitions and investments, also known as land grabs. The reports looked at the financial risk associated with international land investments ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Cost-Benefit Analyses: Exploring the Economics of On-Farm Composting

    When exploring the merits of on-farm composting, the question most often raised is: What are the economics? How do the savings or revenues from on-farm composting compare to the costs? Of course, the answer is the ever present “it depends.” Expenses, resources, revenue opportunities, environmental constraints and circumstances vary greatly from one farm to the next. Most people would agree that ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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